Video Archive | Architectural discourse (144)

Jeffrey Kipnis & Eric Owen Moss Look You Got It All...
Jeffrey Kipnis prefaces the final conversation of the Look! You got it all wrong series by introducing the session's...
Jeffrey Kipnis & Eric Owen Moss Look You Got It All...
Jeffrey Kipnis begins the fourth and final conversation of the Look! You got it all wrong series by introducing Eric...
Jeffrey Kipnis & Eric Owen Moss Look You Got It All...
Jeffrey Kipnis and Eric Owen Moss discuss topics related to history, including precedents in architectural discourse, the value...
Todd Gannon Thesis Research Lecture-clip_9771
Todd Gannon proposes five guidelines to graduate students embarking on their thesis, starting with Privilege Difference Over...
Todd Gannon Thesis Research Lecture-clip_9772
Todd Gannon continues his presentation of five guidelines for thesis with Point #3: Privilege How Over What, Point...
Todd Gannon Thesis Research Lecture
Todd Gannon proposes five general guidelines to graduate students embarking on their thesis:
Andrew Zago Thesis Research Lecture-clip_9756
Andrew Zago briefly outlines the recent trajectory of thesis at SCI-Arc, stressing the ideas of relevance and plausibility--which...
Andrew Zago Thesis Research Lecture
Andrew Zago briefly outlines the recent history of thesis at SCI-Arc in terms of relevance and plausibility, illustrating how a...

Jeffrey Kipnis & Eric Owen Moss Look You Got It All Wrong 4

Jeffrey Kipnis prefaces the final conversation of the Look! You got it all wrong series by introducing the session’s topic: history. Eric Owen Moss proposes history as a way of defining coordinates to orient oneself, presenting images ranging from the Nazca lines to Lucien Freud, and quotes from Ecclesiastes to Veronica Wedgwood’s “History is an art–like all the other sciences.” Kipnis and Moss discuss precedents, experience, significance, and learning about architecture historically. With a student in the audience they discuss John Lukacs’s The Hitler of History.

 

 

Clips

Jeffrey Kipnis & Eric Owen Moss Look You Got It All...
Jeffrey Kipnis & Eric Owen Moss Look You Got It All Wrong 4-clip_9799
Jeffrey Kipnis & Eric Owen Moss Look You Got It All...
Jeffrey Kipnis & Eric Owen Moss Look You Got It All Wrong 4-clip_9800
Jeffrey Kipnis reminds students that they are required to read John Lukacs's The Hitler of History. He responds to Eric...
Jeffrey Kipnis & Eric Owen Moss Look You Got It All...
Jeffrey Kipnis & Eric Owen Moss Look You Got It All Wrong 4-clip_9801

Jeffrey Kipnis & Eric Owen Moss Look You Got It All Wrong 4-clip_9799

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Jeffrey Kipnis begins the fourth and final conversation of the Look! You got it all wrong series by introducing Eric Owen Moss and the session’s topic: history. Moss proposes history as a way of defining coordinates to orient oneself. He presents images of the Nazca lines, and pictures by Goya, Dürer, Blake, Lucien Freud, and discusses quotes from Kierkegaard, Nietzsche, Isaiah, Ecclesiastes, Owen Barfield, and Veronica Wedgwood’s “History is an art–like all the other sciences.”


Jeffrey Kipnis & Eric Owen Moss Look You Got It All Wrong 4-clip_9801

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Jeffrey Kipnis and Eric Owen Moss discuss topics related to history, including precedents in architectural discourse, the value of experience, significance in architecture, learning about architecture historically, publications versus building.


Todd Gannon Thesis Research Lecture

February 16, 2015 | Video Lecturer:
Introduction by:

Todd Gannon proposes five general guidelines to graduate students embarking on their thesis:

  1. Privilege Difference Over Similarity
  2. Avoid Cliché Making
  3. Privilege How Over What
  4. Develop New Vocabularies
  5. Enfranchise New Constituencies

Clips

Todd Gannon Thesis Research Lecture-clip_9770
Todd Gannon Thesis Research Lecture-clip_9770
Andrew Zago prefaces Todd Gannon's talk by stressing the importance of cultivating the public conversation of the thesis effort.
Todd Gannon Thesis Research Lecture-clip_9771
Todd Gannon Thesis Research Lecture-clip_9771
Todd Gannon Thesis Research Lecture-clip_9772
Todd Gannon Thesis Research Lecture-clip_9772

Andrew Zago Thesis Research Lecture-clip_9756

View the Full Video: Andrew Zago Thesis Research Lecture
February 9, 2015 | Video Lecturer:

Subclip

Andrew Zago briefly outlines the recent trajectory of thesis at SCI-Arc, stressing the ideas of relevance and plausibility–which he distinguishes from feasibility and practicality. He illustrates the difference with the progression from Taut’s Alpine Architecture (1917), to Mies van der Rohe’s 1921 Friedrichstrasse tower, and SOM’s 1952 Lever House.


Andrew Zago Thesis Research Lecture

February 9, 2015 | Video Lecturer:
Introduction by:

Andrew Zago briefly outlines the recent history of thesis at SCI-Arc in terms of relevance and plausibility, illustrating how a project’s plausibility might be made visceral through the visual presentation strategy. Zago distinguishes working through tradition from taking refuge in tradition. On the theme of technique, he distinguishes architectural drawing from illustration, and technique and the technical. He ends with work by Foujimoto, Gehry and Nouvel that pose challenges in terms of how they might be presented.

Clips

Andrew Zago Thesis Research Lecture-clip_9759
Andrew Zago Thesis Research Lecture-clip_9759
Andrew Zago Thesis Research Lecture-clip_9758
Andrew Zago Thesis Research Lecture-clip_9758
Andrew Zago Thesis Research Lecture-clip_9755
Andrew Zago Thesis Research Lecture-clip_9755
Themes: ,
Elena Manferdini describes some of the upcoming events in the Spring 2015 Thesis Research seminar following Andrew Zago's lecture.
Andrew Zago Thesis Research Lecture-clip_9756
Andrew Zago Thesis Research Lecture-clip_9756
Andrew Zago Thesis Research Lecture-clip_9757
Andrew Zago Thesis Research Lecture-clip_9757