Video Archive | Architectural discourse (173)

Brett Steele Picking Up Where I Left Off
Brett Steele characterizes thesis projects as Trojan horses that make existing architecture irrelevant. They also invent a...
Brett Steele Picking Up Where I Left Off-clip_10589
Brett Steele characterizes thesis projects as Trojan horses, that make all existing architecture irrelevant. He argues that their...
Brett Steele Picking Up Where I Left Off-clip_10590
Brett Steele argues that architecture schools are important as stages where people can rehearse and refine their performance as...
Brett Steele Picking Up Where I Left Off-clip_10591
Brett Steele notes that the architect's task of communication today must deal with information overload--hence the importance of...
Antoine Picon Architecture Matter And Language In The...
Antoine Picon argues that the recent digital revolution was inaugurated in the last 19th century, as federal bureaucracies and...
Joe Day Thesis Research Lecture-clip_10564
Joe Day describes his own use of diagrams, beginning with his thesis project in the 1990s, which mapped connections between...
Joe Day Thesis Research Lecture-clip_10566
Joe Day discusses cases where the diagram generated the project, from Corbusier's Radiant City (1924) to Dalí's...
Joe Day Thesis Research Lecture-clip_10567
Joe Day responds to audience comments on using thesis to launch a career, and his own preference for working from specific cases...

Brett Steele Picking Up Where I Left Off

March 25, 2016 | Video Lecturer:
Introduction by:

Brett Steele characterizes thesis projects as Trojan horses that make existing architecture irrelevant. They also invent a distinctive way of being an architect. He cites the case Charles-Édouard Jeanneret-Gris, moving from Switzerland to Paris, renaming himself Le Corbusier, and producing the Dom-ino house plan in 1914. He notes how Corbusier’s publications established a precedent for later architects. Steele argues that architecture schools are important as stages where people can rehearse and refine their performance as architects. He stresses that the architect’s task of communication today must deal with information overload–hence editing is the essential skill. He discusses projects by Philip Johnson, Robert Venturi, Koolhaas, and Toyo Ito that provided a launch pad for their subsequent careers

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Brett Steele Picking Up Where I Left Off-clip_10590
Brett Steele Picking Up Where I Left Off-clip_10590
Brett Steele Picking Up Where I Left Off-clip_10588
Brett Steele Picking Up Where I Left Off-clip_10588
Hernan Diaz Alonso introduces Brett Steele, comparing the collaboration between the AA and SCI-Arc to The Avengers movie.
Brett Steele Picking Up Where I Left Off-clip_10589
Brett Steele Picking Up Where I Left Off-clip_10589
Brett Steele Picking Up Where I Left Off-clip_10591
Brett Steele Picking Up Where I Left Off-clip_10591

Brett Steele Picking Up Where I Left Off-clip_10589

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Brett Steele characterizes thesis projects as Trojan horses, that make all existing architecture irrelevant. He argues that their focus is on creating a new architect, rather than architecture, citing Charles-Édouard Jeanneret-Gris’s move from Switzerland to Paris, renaming himself Le Corbusier, and producing the Dom-ino house plan in 1914. Steele notes how Corbusier’s production of publications also established a precedent for subsequent architects through Koolhaas.


Brett Steele Picking Up Where I Left Off-clip_10590

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Brett Steele argues that architecture schools are important as stages where people can rehearse and refine their performance as architects. He notes how Vitruvius, at the creation of the idea of architecture, focused on the circumstances through which architecture was produced–the architect–rather than artifacts.


Brett Steele Picking Up Where I Left Off-clip_10591

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Brett Steele notes that the architect’s task of communication today must deal with information overload–hence the importance of editing. He cites Gordon Lish’s radical cutting of Raymond Carver’s manuscripts. He discusses thesis projects by Philip Johnson, Robert Venturi, and Koolhaas. He describes Toyo Ito’s career starting with science fiction stories. He stresses, “Architects don’t make architecture. They make themselves.”


Antoine Picon Architecture Matter And Language In The Digital Age-clip_10556

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Antoine Picon argues that the recent digital revolution was inaugurated in the last 19th century, as federal bureaucracies and global corporations became producers and consumers of big data. He proposes that the most significant consequences for architecture have been a new experience of the world, and a co-production of non-human and human hybrids.


Joe Day Thesis Research Lecture-clip_10564

View the Full Video: Joe Day Thesis Research Lecture
March 3, 2016 | Video Lecturer:

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Joe Day describes his own use of diagrams, beginning with his thesis project in the 1990s, which mapped connections between Roberto Matta, Gordon Matta-Clark, Marcel Duchamp, and Piranesi. He describes an attempt to make sense of architectural practice in L.A. in 2002, and a current project of tracing lineages in contemporary Japanese architecture.


Joe Day Thesis Research Lecture-clip_10566

View the Full Video: Joe Day Thesis Research Lecture
March 3, 2016 | Video Lecturer:

Subclip

Joe Day discusses cases where the diagram generated the project, from Corbusier’s Radiant City (1924) to Dalí’s paranoic-critical works, Rem Koolhaas, and Benjamin Constant. He presents his most recent attempt to map the most important issues at SCI-Arc with two diagrams representing a range of positions within the categories of Science and Philosophy. He concludes with the diagrams that led to his book Corrections and Collections (2013).