Video Archive | Architectural discourse (160)

Robort Somol See What I’m Saying-clip_10479
Robert Somol contrasts the 2015 Chicago Architecture Biennial with the State of Art of Architecture symposium held in...
Robort Somol See What I’m Saying
Robert Somol characterizes his topic as the realignment of words and things, or more precisely books and buildings from the 1960s...
Brett Steele And Hernan Diaz Alonso Precedent And...
For the first of a series of public conversations structured as duels and duets, Hernan Diaz Alonso proposes investigating the...
Neil Denari Thesis Building-clip_10357
Tom Wiscombe introduces Neil Denari, pointing out themes visible in his work, such as figural apertures and continuously...
Neil Denari Thesis Building-clip_10358
Neil Denari begins with a description of unexpectedly encountering a house in Fort Worth designed by Paul Rudolph (1970) when he...
Neil Denari Thesis Building-clip_10359
Neil Denari continues discussing buildings that might or might not constitute a thesis, including Toyo Ito's Taichung...
Neil Denari Thesis Building-clip_10361
Beginning with Robert Venturi's house for his mother (1964), Neil Denari discusses buildings that definitely argue a thesis. He...
Neil Denari Thesis Building-clip_10362
Neil Denari discusses his Interrupted Projections, Gallery MA, Tokyo (1996). He discusses the difference between designs that...

Robort Somol See What I’m Saying-clip_10479

View the Full Video: Robort Somol See What I’m Saying
January 27, 2016 | Video Lecturer:

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Robert Somol contrasts the 2015 Chicago Architecture Biennial with the State of Art of Architecture symposium held in Chicago 38 years earlier.  He contrasts the earlier goal of debating positions with the current emphasis on presenting results. He observes a flattening of history through a focus on the “perpetual now.” Somol argues that one symptom is a total disconnect between the discourse of architects and their forms.


Robort Somol See What I’m Saying

January 27, 2016 | Video Lecturer:
Introduction by:

Robert Somol characterizes his topic as the realignment of words and things, or more precisely books and buildings from the 1960s through the mid-1990s. He argues that two modes of engagement with language: indexical (words to read) and speech acts (words to look at) generated two different streams of architectural discourse. One stemming from Colin Rowe, and includes Hedjuk, Rossi, and Eisenman. The other from Banham, and includes Cedric Price, Venturi, and Koolhaas. Somol proposes Herzog and De Meuron as a hybrid of the two streams, and continues the discussion of words as language and words as things, illustrating his points with projects by Herzog and De Meuron with Rémy Zaugg. Somol contrasts the 2015 Chicago Architecture Biennal with the State of Art of Architecture symposium held in Chicago 38 years earlier.  Where earlier the goal was debating positions, the current emphasis is on presenting results. Somol argues that one symptom is a disconnect between the discourse of architects and their forms.

Clips

Robort Somol See What I’m Saying-clip_10475
Robort Somol See What I’m Saying-clip_10475
Hernan Diaz Alonso introduces Robert Somol as one of the creators of contemporary architectural discourse, and a master of a...
Robort Somol See What I’m Saying-clip_10476
Robort Somol See What I’m Saying-clip_10476
Robort Somol See What I’m Saying-clip_10477
Robort Somol See What I’m Saying-clip_10477
Robort Somol See What I’m Saying-clip_10478
Robort Somol See What I’m Saying-clip_10478
Robort Somol See What I’m Saying-clip_10479
Robort Somol See What I’m Saying-clip_10479

Brett Steele And Hernan Diaz Alonso Precedent And Genealogy

December 2, 2015 | Video Lecturer: ,
Introduction by:

For the first of a series of public conversations structured as duels and duets, Hernan Diaz Alonso proposes investigating the idea of the architectprecedent, and genealogy. Brett Steele responds by arguing that duels and duets are ritualized forms of conflict that have renewed relevance, and outlines oppositional pairs that have defined architecture from Le Corbusier and Mies van der Rohe to Peter Eisenman and Rem Koolhaas. Diaz Alonso and Steele discuss the tribalization of architectural culture, nostalgia versus history, the need to create audiences for architecture, and the fragmentation of the avant-garde in the absence of historical enemies.

Clips

Brett Steele And Hernan Diaz Alonso Precedent And...
Brett Steele And Hernan Diaz Alonso Precedent And Genealogy-clip_10380
Tom Wiscombe introduces Hernan Diaz Alonso and Brett Steele, noting that this will be the first of a series of events structured...
Brett Steele And Hernan Diaz Alonso Precedent And...
Brett Steele And Hernan Diaz Alonso Precedent And Genealogy-clip_10381
Brett Steele And Hernan Diaz Alonso Precedent And...
Brett Steele And Hernan Diaz Alonso Precedent And Genealogy-clip_10382
Brett Steele takes up the proposed notions of duel and duet as ritualized forms of conflict that have renewed relevance. He cites...
Brett Steele And Hernan Diaz Alonso Precedent And...
Brett Steele And Hernan Diaz Alonso Precedent And Genealogy-clip_10383
Brett Steele And Hernan Diaz Alonso Precedent And...
Brett Steele And Hernan Diaz Alonso Precedent And Genealogy-clip_10384
Hernan Diaz Alonso and Brett Steele respond to audience comments on tribalism, experimenting with boringness as a change...

Neil Denari Thesis Building-clip_10358

View the Full Video: Neil Denari Thesis Building
November 13, 2015 | Video Lecturer:

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Neil Denari begins with a description of unexpectedly encountering a house in Fort Worth designed by Paul Rudolph (1970) when he was seventeen. It was a shock that convinced him architecture was an adventure he wanted to be part of. Denari turns to historical examples of building that might or might not constitute a thesis, starting with Corbusier’s Villa Savoye and the Florey Building, Oxford (1971) by James Stirling. Denari points out how Frank O. Gehry’s Foundation Louis Vuitton, Paris (2014) employs very traditional materials, but delivers them in a new way.


Neil Denari Thesis Building-clip_10359

View the Full Video: Neil Denari Thesis Building
November 13, 2015 | Video Lecturer:

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Neil Denari continues discussing buildings that might or might not constitute a thesis, including Toyo Ito’s Taichung Metropolitan Opera House (under construction); Benthem Crouwel’s extention to the Stedelijk Museum (2012); the Lords Media Cenre (1999) and Nezo Ferrari Museum, Modena (2012) by Jan Kaplický/Future Systems; Heatherwick Studio’s UK Pavilion at the 2010 Shanghai Expo; Hitoshi Abe’s Kanno Museum, Shiogama (2006); Philip Johnson’s house in Cambridge (1942); Milstein Hall, Cornell University by Rem Koolhaas/OMA (2011); SANAA’s Glass Pavilion for the Toledo Museum of Art (2006); and Bernard Tschumi’s Glass Video Gallery, Groningen (1990).


Neil Denari Thesis Building-clip_10361

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November 13, 2015 | Video Lecturer:

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Beginning with Robert Venturi’s house for his mother (1964), Neil Denari discusses buildings that definitely argue a thesis. He discusses several Peter Eisenman projects from House III (1961-71) to the City of Culture of Galica, Santiago de Compostela (2013); Superstudio’s Continuous Monument (1969); Coop Himmelb(l)au’s Basel Event: the Restless Sphere (1971); and works by Buckminster Fuller, Claude Parent, Heinz Isler, Frei Otto, Zaha Hadid, and Coop Himmelb(l)au’s Musée des Confluences, Lyon (2014).


Neil Denari Thesis Building-clip_10362

View the Full Video: Neil Denari Thesis Building
November 13, 2015 | Video Lecturer:

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Neil Denari discusses his Interrupted Projections, Gallery MA, Tokyo (1996). He discusses the difference between designs that exist in movies (Elysium, Oblivion) and reality (El Helicoide, Caracas and Herzog & de Meuron’s Allianz Arena, Munich (2005). He notes how material like concrete can become a thesis in projects like Gottfried Böhm’s Pilgrimage Church, Neviges (1968) and Colirndo Testa’s Banco de Londres (1966). He discusses Emerson College in Hollywood (2014) by Morphosis. He concludes by noting the distinction between just going with your interests and attempting to make a contribution.