Video Archive | Art (128)

Kit Galloway and Sherrie Rabinowitz-clip_9099
Kit Galloway and Sherrie Rabinowitzshow a video documenting the Electronic Café (1984), which they describe as a...
Kit Galloway and Sherrie Rabinowitz-clip_9097
Kit Galloway and Sherrie Rabinowitz present their lecture together. Rabinowitz says the theme of their talk is "virtual space,"...
Kit Galloway and Sherrie Rabinowitz-clip_9096
Phil Silberman introduces Kit Galloway and Sherrie Rabinowitz as "telecommunications artists." He outlines their teaching at...
Peter Noever-clip_6754
Noever discusses his interest in space, site, and art. He discusses the problems of a conventional museum regarding space and...
Peter Noever-clip_6753
Eric Owen Moss welcomes Peter Noever. Moss stresses Noever's talent as a facilitator, arguing that Noever has made a place and a...
Peter Noever-clip_6757
Noever discusses artists Chris Burden, Sol Lewitt, Vito Acconci, Anish Kapoor, Dennis Hopper, and the Gao Brothers. Noever...
Peter Noever-clip_6755
After observing a moment of silence for the late Raimund Abraham, Noever continues his lecture, comparing the work of Anselm...
Peter Noever
Peter Noever discusses the problems conventional museums have regarding space and site. After observing a moment of silence for...

Kit Galloway and Sherrie Rabinowitz-clip_9099

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Kit Galloway and Sherrie Rabinowitzshow a video documenting the Electronic Café (1984), which they describe as a virtual space which functions as a “community information center.” Rabinowitz says “it is probably the most complex of all our projects” for the way it integrated technology, media and people across five different locations in Los Angeles. Galloway expresses their interest in virtual space is to create “teleconferencing terminals” ultimately for desktop use. Galloway and Rabinowitz answer questions from the audience.  Galloway calls for a national policy for information and database access. Galloway is asked about ISDN and he replies, “It stinks.” Rabinowitz adds that the companies offering services, such as ISDN are trademarking processes and protocols, not products. Galloway also talks about the lack of “public dividend” from the developments of the defense industry, largely produced from taxpayer money. He also explains his and Rabinowitz’s term, “adventrepreneuring.” He believes in letting the market define the future rather than a company. Another question relates to the viability of telecommunicating video personas. Galloway then describes scenarios with h0lograms.


Kit Galloway and Sherrie Rabinowitz-clip_9097

Subclip

Kit Galloway and Sherrie Rabinowitz present their lecture together. Rabinowitz says the theme of their talk is “virtual space,” which they consider a new frontier, and a “new way of being in the world.” They show videotapes which she says could be “considered environmental impact studies” for the digital world. Galloway talks about the term, “systems integrator,” and draws parallels to their work. They show a thirty-minute videotape of their project, Hole in Space (1980), which Rabinowitz describes as a live two-way satellite link between New York and Los Angeles enabling people to meet in a social, virtual space. The video documents the experience of the live event. The next video Galloway and Rabinowitz show is a 1977 satellite technology project demonstrating what they “composite image space” enabling people to share the same virtual space by combining live video images. They also show a video of their project, Aesthetic Research in Tele-Communications (1975-1982). Rabinowitz ties the videos back to architecture stating, “the image is the place and the architecture becomes the image.”


Kit Galloway and Sherrie Rabinowitz-clip_9096

Subclip

Phil Silberman introduces Kit Galloway and Sherrie Rabinowitz as “telecommunications artists.” He outlines their teaching at UCLA and Loyola Marymount University. He mentions their projects, Hole in Space, and the Electronic Cafe which was part of the 1984 Olympic Arts Festival. He says they have an interest in “creating at that same level we destroy.”


Peter Noever

December 9, 2011 | Video Lecturer:
Introduction by:

Peter Noever discusses the problems conventional museums have regarding space and site. After observing a moment of silence for the late Raimund Abraham, Noever discusses artists such as James Turrell, Anselm Keifer, Donald Judd, Paul McCarthy, Chris Burden, and Vito Acconci.

Clips

Peter Noever-clip_6753
Peter Noever-clip_6753
Eric Owen Moss welcomes Peter Noever. Moss stresses Noever's talent as a facilitator, arguing that Noever has made a place and a...
Peter Noever-clip_6754
Peter Noever-clip_6754
Noever discusses his interest in space, site, and art. He discusses the problems of a conventional museum regarding space and...
Peter Noever-clip_6755
Peter Noever-clip_6755
After observing a moment of silence for the late Raimund Abraham, Noever continues his lecture, comparing the work of Anselm...
Peter Noever-clip_6757
Peter Noever-clip_6757
Noever discusses artists Chris Burden, Sol Lewitt, Vito Acconci, Anish Kapoor, Dennis Hopper, and the Gao Brothers. Noever...