Video Archive | Le Corbusier (93)

Jeffrey Kipnis & Eric Owen Moss Look You Got It All...
Eric Owen Moss responds to the proposed topic by describing his Penelope theory of architecture, in which building and making are...
Jeffrey Kipnis And Eric Owen Moss Figure Ground Game...
Eric Owen Moss asks Jeffrey Kipnis about his use of Le Corbusier's slogan "Architecture or revolution," generating a general...
Andrew Zago An Awkward Position-clip_7928
Andrew Zago begins by discussing other architects, personal friends, strangers, long-time influences, intermittently influential...
Pier Vittorio Aureli Theory And Ethos-clip_7902
Pier Vittorio Aureli notes that Corbusier's 1923 Towards an Architecture was originally titled Architecture or...
Peter Eisenman Projects & Practice-clip_7565
Peter Eisenman makes a distinction between architectural practice, where the world defines what the architect is, and an...
José Oubrerie
José Oubrerie shows the audience drawings given to him by Le Corbusier, and his own sketches--some produced as he addresses the...
José Oubrerie-clip_6725
José Oubrerie stresses the importance of maintaining the church's original design, while solving problems using contemporary...
José Oubrerie-clip_6726
Oubrerie discusses the difficulty of doing a building on his own. He talks about the French Cultural Center in Damascus, a design...

Jeffrey Kipnis & Eric Owen Moss Look You Got It All Wrong 1-clip_9521

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Eric Owen Moss responds to the proposed topic by describing his Penelope theory of architecture, in which building and making are necessarily accompanied by unmaking and doubt. He reviews important influences, including the radicalized environment of Berkeley in the 1960s, Corbusier’s proposed balance of Apollo and Dionysus, El Caracol in Chichen Itza, and Immanuel Velikovsky. He contrasts a sketch by Erich Mendelsohn with his later Einstein Tower, arguing that by failing to address the implications of initial idea, Mendelsohn “built the outside of the sketch.”


Jeffrey Kipnis And Eric Owen Moss Figure Ground Game Gallery Talk-clip_8456

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Eric Owen Moss asks Jeffrey Kipnis about his use of Le Corbusier’s slogan “Architecture or revolution,” generating a general discussion about the capacity of architecture for changing the world.


Andrew Zago An Awkward Position-clip_7928

View the Full Video: Andrew Zago An Awkward Position
February 6, 2013 | Video Lecturer:

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Andrew Zago begins by discussing other architects, personal friends, strangers, long-time influences, intermittently influential presences, and people he productively misunderstands, from Jeff Kipnis, Neil Denari, to Ledoux and Sylvia Lavin.


Pier Vittorio Aureli Theory And Ethos-clip_7902

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Pier Vittorio Aureli notes that Corbusier’s 1923 Towards an Architecture was originally titled Architecture or Revolution. He describes Corbusier’s Dom-ino plan of a basic building unit as a single pixel in an urban screen. Aureli describes post-World War II Athens as “a lava flow” created by multiplication of a Dom-ino-like polykatoikia basic building type, which was encouraged by municipal building codes. In contemporary Athens Aureli sees a realization of Archizoom’s infrastructural grid, stripped of utopianism. Aureli concludes that design is not enough, and that it might be necessary for architects to abandon the idea of the project in order to engage the urban totality.


Peter Eisenman Projects & Practice-clip_7565

View the Full Video: Peter Eisenman Projects & Practice
March 5, 2012 | Video Lecturer:

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Peter Eisenman makes a distinction between architectural practice, where the world defines what the architect is, and an architectural project, where the architect defines what the world is. Bernini, Philip Johnson, and I. M. Pei had architectural practices, where Boromini, Corbusier, and Aldo Rossi had architectural projects. An architectural project is an attitude toward building, and needs to be realized in an actual building.  Architectural history is mostly concerned with architectural projects. Moreover, Eisenman claims there have been six meta-projects in architectural history, six projects that have defined the architectural discourse of their times, and shaped subsequent architectural projects. Vitruvius insinuated Greek architectural ideas into Italian and ultimately French discourse. Alberti contributed two thoughts: that a building is both a thing and a sign of the thing, and that the most important thing is the relation of parts to the whole. Claude Perrault denied the reality of ideal beauty and insisted on buildings being in the now. Piranesi invented a post-utopian Enlightenment archaeologic discourse. Around 1812 the French Academy instituted a new position of professor of theory, institutionalizing the notion that theory existed as a discourse independent of history. In 1914 Le Corbusier invented the Domino House System, establishing a language within which, a century later, architects still work, despite superficial innovations of postmodern rococo.


José Oubrerie

November 2, 2011 | Video Lecturer:
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José Oubrerie shows the audience drawings given to him by Le Corbusier, and his own sketches–some produced as he addresses the audience–to explain the process behind the Church of St. Pierre in Firminy. He stresses the importance of maintaining the church’s original design, while solving problems using contemporary technology. He also discusses his own idependent work.

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Todd Gannon introduces José Oubrerie. Gannon briefly reviews Oubrerie's body of work, his teaching, and his collaborations with...
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