Video Archive | Modernism (139)

Barry Bergdoll Out Of Site In Plain View-clip_8549
Eric Owen Moss characterizes Barry Bergdoll's role as curator of architecture and design at MOMA as implicated in contradictory...
Barry Bergdoll Out Of Site In Plain View
Barry Bergdoll begins by surveying the popularity and ubiquity of architecture exhibitions, noting the rise to prominence of the...
Kenneth Frampton & Eric Owen Moss Dialectical Lyric
To Kenneth Frampton's critique of architectural waste as exemplified by OMA's CCTV Headquarters in Beijing, Eric Owen Moss...
Kenneth Frampton Towards An Agonistic Architecture
After a brief homage to Raimund Abraham, Kenneth Frampton outlines the trajectory of critical regionalism, from the first...
Joan Ockman An Orchid In The Land Of Technology
Joan Ockman begins a discussion of Arne Jacobsen's SAS Royal Hotel, Copenhagen with a description of what it would have been like...
Jeff Kipnis Thesis Prep Talk Part Two-clip_3636
Jeffrey Kipnis comments on the SCI-Arc sensibility, and the importance of extending its attitudes and ideas into an independent...
Jorge Francisco Liernur Austral Group A CIAM Brigade In...
Jorge Francisco “Pancho” Liernur, Dean of the School of Architecture at the Torcuato Di Tella University in Buenos Aires. ...
Jorge Francisco Liernur Austral Group A CIAM Brigade In...
Marcelo Spina introduces Jorge Francisco “Pancho” Liernur, Dean of the School of Architecture at the Torcuato Di Tella...

Barry Bergdoll Out Of Site In Plain View-clip_8549

Subclip

Eric Owen Moss characterizes Barry Bergdoll’s role as curator of architecture and design at MOMA as implicated in contradictory ideas of what modernity is: a set of stylistic tropes that can be taught as a method, or an open-ended search for, in André Malraux”s phrase, “messages yet unknown.”


Barry Bergdoll Out Of Site In Plain View

February 5, 2014 | Video Lecturer:
Introduction by:

Barry Bergdoll begins by surveying the popularity and ubiquity of architecture exhibitions, noting the rise to prominence of the curator’s voice. He proposes understanding architecture exhibitions as part of the invention of a self-conscious modernism that has repeatedly changed architecture for the last 250 years. Bergdoll stresses the promotional exhibitions of the 1760s, such as the Society of Arts in London, and the Academy in Paris, where architects exhibited drawings, prints or paintings of unrealized buildings. The first curator in the modern sense of the term, according to Bergdoll, was Alexandre Lenoir, who as first director of the revolutionary Musée des monuments français, worked not only to preserve culturally significant structures, but to change their cultural meaning from monuments of tyranny to cultural patrimony. Bergdoll surveys some of the decisive architectural exhibitions of early modernism, which presented a spatial experience rather than a narrative. Bergdoll concludes with discussions of two of his projects at MOMA, Rising Currents (2010) and Foreclosed (2012), as part of a long tradition of architectural exhibitions that are not passive mirrors of current trends, but actively creating possibilities.

 

Clips

Barry Bergdoll Out Of Site In Plain View-clip_8554
Barry Bergdoll Out Of Site In Plain View-clip_8554
Barry Bergdoll Out Of Site In Plain View-clip_8549
Barry Bergdoll Out Of Site In Plain View-clip_8549

Kenneth Frampton & Eric Owen Moss Dialectical Lyric

To Kenneth Frampton’s critique of architectural waste as exemplified by OMA’s CCTV Headquarters in Beijing, Eric Owen Moss proposes the exterior of Mies van der Rohe’s Seagram Building, initiating a debate on excess, elegance, structure, and representation in early modernist and 21st century architecture. To Moss’s suggestion that the idea of critical regionalism might be a non sequitur, Frampton responds that while vernacular traditions are no longer accessible, architects can use traditional responses to local conditions to respond constructively to the trauma of modernization. They discuss whether there is any possibility for revolutionary architecture today. The debate concludes with questions from the audience concerning the CCTV, the new Barnes Foundation building, clients, and current architecture in Los Angeles.

Clips

Kenneth Frampton & Eric Owen Moss Dialectical...
Kenneth Frampton & Eric Owen Moss Dialectical Lyric-clip_8413
Kenneth Frampton & Eric Owen Moss Dialectical...
Kenneth Frampton & Eric Owen Moss Dialectical Lyric-clip_8410
Kenneth Frampton & Eric Owen Moss Dialectical...
Kenneth Frampton & Eric Owen Moss Dialectical Lyric-clip_8411
Kenneth Frampton & Eric Owen Moss Dialectical...
Kenneth Frampton & Eric Owen Moss Dialectical Lyric-clip_8412

Kenneth Frampton Towards An Agonistic Architecture

December 4, 2013 | Video Lecturer:
Introduction by:

After a brief homage to Raimund Abraham, Kenneth Frampton outlines the trajectory of critical regionalism, from the first edition of Modern Architecture: a critical history (1980), through “Critical Regionalism: Six Points for an Architecture of Resistance” (1983), and discusses some projects that illustrate his ideas by Álvaro Siza, Tadao Ando, and Jørn Utzon. Frampton discusses how he began to formulate his ideas on more recent architectural developments in the 1994 reprint of Modern Architecture. He emphatically rejects the Beijing CCTV Headquarters (2012) and National Stadium (2008) as irrational and unethical. As an alternative to this kind of globalist practice, Frampton surveys contemporary projects by architects working in developing nations, including Jan Olav Jensen, Haikkinen-Komonen Architects, Hollmén-Reuter-Sandman Architects, Dick van Gameren Architecten, Richard Murphy Architects, and Siza’s Iberê Camargo Museum in Brazil (2008). Frampton concludes by discussing Bijoy Jain and Studio Mumbai, stressing how projects such as the Palmyra house (2007) demonstrate a strategy of integrating design craft which might provide a viable path between globalist phantasmagoria and uncritical traditionalism.

 

Clips

Kenneth Frampton Towards An Agonistic...
Kenneth Frampton Towards An Agonistic Architecture-clip_8417
Kenneth Frampton Towards An Agonistic...
Kenneth Frampton Towards An Agonistic Architecture-clip_8418
Kenneth Frampton Towards An Agonistic...
Kenneth Frampton Towards An Agonistic Architecture-clip_8419
Kenneth Frampton Towards An Agonistic...
Kenneth Frampton Towards An Agonistic Architecture-clip_8421

Joan Ockman An Orchid In The Land Of Technology

November 20, 2013 | Video Lecturer:
Introduction by:

Joan Ockman begins a discussion of Arne Jacobsen’s SAS Royal Hotel, Copenhagen with a description of what it would have been like to arrive in the lobby in its original state in the 1960s. After reviewing Jacobsen’s work before the hotel, she discusses the site, design and initial hostile response in Copenhagen. Ockman discusses Jacobsen’s control of every element of the hotel’s design, while pointing out moments when Jacobsen subverts the seemlessness of the thoroughly-designed environment with paradox and wit. She concludes by speculating that Jacobsen’s hotel might have been a source for the bewildering modernist locations of Jacques Tati’s Playtime.

Clips

Joan Ockman An Orchid In The Land Of Technology-clip_8396
Joan Ockman An Orchid In The Land Of Technology-clip_8396
Todd Gannon introduces Joan Ockman as an essential resource for understanding post-war architectural discourse, through her...
Joan Ockman An Orchid In The Land Of Technology-clip_8397
Joan Ockman An Orchid In The Land Of Technology-clip_8397
Joan Ockman An Orchid In The Land Of Technology-clip_8398
Joan Ockman An Orchid In The Land Of Technology-clip_8398
Joan Ockman An Orchid In The Land Of Technology-clip_8399
Joan Ockman An Orchid In The Land Of Technology-clip_8399
Joan Ockman An Orchid In The Land Of Technology-clip_8400
Joan Ockman An Orchid In The Land Of Technology-clip_8400

Jeff Kipnis Thesis Prep Talk Part Two-clip_3636

Subclip

Jeffrey Kipnis comments on the SCI-Arc sensibility, and the importance of extending its attitudes and ideas into an independent voice. He stresses the value of drawing parallels between seemingly unrelated fields. Citing Le Corbusier, he discusses the effort of producing an effect and the tendency of effects to go out of fashion.


Jorge Francisco Liernur Austral Group A CIAM Brigade In The Far South 1937-1948

January 19, 2011 | Video Lecturer:
Introduction by:

Jorge Francisco “Pancho” Liernur, Dean of the School of Architecture at the Torcuato Di Tella University in Buenos Aires.  Liernur discusses the modern movement in Argentina through the work of the Austral Group, including Antonio Bonet, Juan Kurchan and Jorge Ferrari Hardoy. Liernur discusses projects ranging from Hardoy’s Butterfly Chair (a.k.a. BKF Chair), to buildings and urban planning.

Clips

Jorge Francisco Liernur Austral Group A CIAM Brigade In...
Jorge Francisco Liernur Austral Group A CIAM Brigade In The Far South 1937-1948-clip_4308
Jorge Francisco Liernur Austral Group A CIAM Brigade In...
Jorge Francisco Liernur Austral Group A CIAM Brigade In The Far South 1937-1948-clip_4309
Jorge Francisco Liernur Austral Group A CIAM Brigade In...
Jorge Francisco Liernur Austral Group A CIAM Brigade In The Far South 1937-1948-clip_4310

Jorge Francisco Liernur Austral Group A CIAM Brigade In The Far South 1937-1948-clip_4308

Subclip

Marcelo Spina introduces Jorge Francisco “Pancho” Liernur, Dean of the School of Architecture at the Torcuato Di Tella University in Buenos Aires.  Liernur outlines the history of modernism in Argentina, especially the impact of Le Corbusier’s urban design.