Video Archive | SCI-Arc (154)

Benjamin Farnsworth Design Of Theory Fellowship...
Dora Epstein Jones introduces Benjamin Farnsworth, who with Stefano Passeri were the first Design of Theory Fellows at SCI-Arc...
Jeffrey Kipnis & Florencia Pita-clip_9560
Jeffrey Kipnis introduces the second of the Fecundity of a Mossy Climate conversations with a survey of Florencia...
Jeffrey Kipnis & Florencia Pita-clip_9561
Jeffrey Kipnis and Marcelyn Gow discuss with Florencia Pita the issues raised by her work, including the significance of the...
Jeffrey Kipnis & Florencia Pita
Jeffrey Kipnis introduces the second of the Fecundity of a Mossy Climate conversations with a survey of Florencia...
Jeffrey Kipnis & Andrew Zago-clip_9528
Jeffrey Kipnis welcomes the audience to the first of a series of conversations titled The Fecundity of a Mossy Climate,...
Jeffrey Kipnis & Andrew Zago-clip_9530
Jeffrey Kipnis and Andrew Zago discuss pedagogy, non-visual techniques of drawing, technology, Boolean operations, and...
Jeffrey Kipnis & Andrew Zago-clip_9531
Jeffrey Kipnis and Andrew Zago respond to audience comments on post-Cartesian geometries, Detroit, and SCI-Arc's evolution.
Jeffrey Kipnis & Andrew Zago
Jeffrey Kipnis begins the first of a series of conversations titled The Fecundity of a Mossy Climate with Andrew Zago....

Benjamin Farnsworth Design Of Theory Fellowship Lecture-clip_9591

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Dora Epstein Jones introduces Benjamin Farnsworth, who with Stefano Passeri were the first Design of Theory Fellows at SCI-Arc  (2013-4). She notes how Farnsworth, when applying for the fellowship, asked the apt question, “What can theory do for us?”


Jeffrey Kipnis & Florencia Pita-clip_9560

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Jeffrey Kipnis introduces the second of the Fecundity of a Mossy Climate conversations with a survey of Florencia Pita’s work, including Tendril Formations in the SCI-Arc Gallery, Alice (2007), the Lapset Playground (2009), the Flowervases (2009),  the Kaohsiung Ferry Port Terminal (2010), Cronopios at the Art Institute of Chicago (2010), and the UMMA Table & Exhibition (2013). Kipnis stresses Pita’s focus on architectural issues, arguing that what often seems to be flatness in her work is only apparent.


Jeffrey Kipnis & Florencia Pita

Jeffrey Kipnis introduces the second of the Fecundity of a Mossy Climate conversations with a survey of Florencia Pita’s work, stressing its focus on architectural issues, and how its flatness is only apparent. Then Kipnis and Florencia Pita discuss her work, joined by Marcelyn Gow, debating plasn, color, affect, and abstraction versus representation, and difficult versus easy geometries.

Clips

Jeffrey Kipnis & Florencia Pita-clip_9561
Jeffrey Kipnis & Florencia Pita-clip_9561
Jeffrey Kipnis & Florencia Pita-clip_9562
Jeffrey Kipnis & Florencia Pita-clip_9562
Jeffrey Kipnis & Florencia Pita-clip_9560
Jeffrey Kipnis & Florencia Pita-clip_9560

Jeffrey Kipnis & Andrew Zago-clip_9528

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Jeffrey Kipnis welcomes the audience to the first of a series of conversations titled The Fecundity of a Mossy Climate, in which he will explore how faculty have been influenced by SCI-Arc, and have themselves influenced the school. He describes Andrew Zago’s development in terms of a sequence of fortuitous engagements with a variety of institutions at crucial moments, both as a student and teacher.


Jeffrey Kipnis & Andrew Zago-clip_9530

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Jeffrey Kipnis and Andrew Zago discuss pedagogy, non-visual techniques of drawing, technology, Boolean operations, and influences in general. Kipnis remarks that Zago’s discussion of his own work demonstrates “why your work has nothing to do with all the work that looks like it.”


Jeffrey Kipnis & Andrew Zago

Jeffrey Kipnis begins the first of a series of conversations titled The Fecundity of a Mossy Climate with Andrew Zago. Kipnis presents an outline of Zago’s work, including the Cipher installation for the SCI-Arc Gallery, the Elevation studies, the Boing! chair, and the Rialto housing development project, proposing stages of being influenced and influencing others. Kipnis and Andrew Zago discuss pedagogy, drawing, technology, Boolean operations, and influences in general. Kipnis remarks that Zago’s characterizations of his own work demonstrate, “why your work has nothing to do with all the work that looks like it.”

Clips

Jeffrey Kipnis & Andrew Zago-clip_9528
Jeffrey Kipnis & Andrew Zago-clip_9528
Jeffrey Kipnis & Andrew Zago-clip_9529
Jeffrey Kipnis & Andrew Zago-clip_9529
Jeffrey Kipnis & Andrew Zago-clip_9530
Jeffrey Kipnis & Andrew Zago-clip_9530
Jeffrey Kipnis & Andrew Zago-clip_9531
Jeffrey Kipnis & Andrew Zago-clip_9531