Video Archive | SCI-Arc (170)

Jeffrey Kipnis Devyn Weiser Peter Testa & Greg...
Jeffrey Kipnis starts the sixth of the Fecundity of a Mossy Climate conversations by differentiating Devyn Weiser...
2015 Grad Thesis Prep Symposium
Thesis proposal presentations by Garet Ammerman, Alex Blugerman, Leonora Bustamente, Eileen Won and Marilyn Hu, Mei Zhi Neoh,...
Eric Owen Moss Not Farewell But Fare Forward-clip_9818
In the first of two introductions, Tom Gilmore describes observing Eric Owen Moss closely for the last fifteen years, evolving...
Wolf Prix Dynamic Raumplan Gallery Talk-clip_9806
Wolf Prix and Eric Owen Moss discuss Prix's Open House project and Moss's work in Culver City as explorations of openness that...
Todd Gannon Thesis Research Lecture
Todd Gannon proposes five general guidelines to graduate students embarking on their thesis:
Andrew Zago Thesis Research Lecture-clip_9755
Elena Manferdini describes some of the upcoming events in the Spring 2015 Thesis Research seminar following Andrew Zago's lecture.
Andrew Zago Thesis Research Lecture-clip_9756
Andrew Zago briefly outlines the recent trajectory of thesis at SCI-Arc, stressing the ideas of relevance and plausibility--which...
Andrew Zago Thesis Research Lecture-clip_9757
Andrew Zago discusses how a project's architectural plausibility can be made visceral through the visual presentation strategy,...

Jeffrey Kipnis Devyn Weiser Peter Testa & Greg Lynn-clip_9879

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Jeffrey Kipnis starts the sixth of the Fecundity of a Mossy Climate conversations by differentiating Devyn Weiser and Peter Testa’s research-based practice from the culturally-based practice of the previous Mossy Climate participants.  He contrasts the ethos of engineering–the greatest good for the most–with the ethos of art–the greatest diversity compatible with coherence.


2015 Grad Thesis Prep Symposium

Thesis proposal presentations by Garet Ammerman, Alex Blugerman, Leonora Bustamente, Eileen Won and Marilyn Hu, Mei Zhi Neoh, and Shawn Rassekh are followed by discussion by Alejandro Zaera-Polo and Jeffrey Kipnis. Zaera-Polo surveys innovative building materials and technologies since World War II, noting a disconnect between sophisticated materials and pedestrian designs. Kipnis discusses different modes of the political as they relate to architecture. He argues that science and technology, far from being in opposition to the aesthetic, can actually work together to reinforce art’s original political project. Elena Manferdini joins Kipnis and Zaera-Polo to discuss practice, facades and envelopes, the engineering model and the art model, typologies, audiences and critics.

Clips

2015 Grad Thesis Prep Symposium-clip_9862
2015 Grad Thesis Prep Symposium-clip_9862
2015 Grad Thesis Prep Symposium-clip_9858
2015 Grad Thesis Prep Symposium-clip_9858
Elena Manferdini identifies the theme of the fifth graduate thesis symposium as architecture and politics.
2015 Grad Thesis Prep Symposium-clip_9859
2015 Grad Thesis Prep Symposium-clip_9859
2015 Grad Thesis Prep Symposium-clip_9860
2015 Grad Thesis Prep Symposium-clip_9860
2015 Grad Thesis Prep Symposium-clip_9861
2015 Grad Thesis Prep Symposium-clip_9861

Todd Gannon Thesis Research Lecture

February 16, 2015 | Video Lecturer:
Introduction by:

Todd Gannon proposes five general guidelines to graduate students embarking on their thesis:

  1. Privilege Difference Over Similarity
  2. Avoid Cliché Making
  3. Privilege How Over What
  4. Develop New Vocabularies
  5. Enfranchise New Constituencies

Clips

Todd Gannon Thesis Research Lecture-clip_9770
Todd Gannon Thesis Research Lecture-clip_9770
Andrew Zago prefaces Todd Gannon's talk by stressing the importance of cultivating the public conversation of the thesis effort.
Todd Gannon Thesis Research Lecture-clip_9771
Todd Gannon Thesis Research Lecture-clip_9771
Todd Gannon Thesis Research Lecture-clip_9772
Todd Gannon Thesis Research Lecture-clip_9772

Andrew Zago Thesis Research Lecture-clip_9756

View the Full Video: Andrew Zago Thesis Research Lecture
February 9, 2015 | Video Lecturer:

Subclip

Andrew Zago briefly outlines the recent trajectory of thesis at SCI-Arc, stressing the ideas of relevance and plausibility–which he distinguishes from feasibility and practicality. He illustrates the difference with the progression from Taut’s Alpine Architecture (1917), to Mies van der Rohe’s 1921 Friedrichstrasse tower, and SOM’s 1952 Lever House.