Video Archive | Technology (155)

Ben Bratton Master Class 1
Ben Bratton characterizes this and the two upcoming talks as complimentary to his forthcoming book, The Stack: On Software...
Right Now Session 3 Aberrations Synthetics & Weird...
Marcelyn Gow prefaces the session by asking what the terms aberration ("straying or wandering from a proper course or...
Right Now Session 3 Aberrations Synthetics & Weird...
Marcelyn Gow asks the panelists if they view their work in terms of the aberrant or the weird. Ferda Kolatan argues that in the...
Right Now Session 3 Aberrations Synthetics & Weird...
Theodore Spyropoulos characterizes his own work as less a pursuit of weirdness than an engagement with the new, shared everyday...
ACADIA Conference Panel At SCI-Arc Design Aesthetics in...
Greg Otto welcomes everyone to the Association for Computer Aided Design in Architecture (ACADIA)'s panel discussion of the...
Jeffrey Kipnis & Eric Owen Moss Look You Got It All...
Jeffrey Kipnis and Eric Owen Moss discuss the importance of designers anticipating what will be technological feasible, stressing...
Antón García-Abril Current Work
Antón García-Abril begins by discussing "Beams," i.e. projects that involve technology inserted in a site, including the...
Alex McDowell-clip_7216
Alex McDowell discusses his work on the film Fight Club and the process involved in creating the sets. He also shows...

Ben Bratton Master Class 1

October 15, 2015 | Video Lecturer:
Introduction by:

Ben Bratton characterizes this and the two upcoming talks as complimentary to his forthcoming book, The Stack: On Software and Sovereignty. He characterizes Carl Schmitt’s concept of nomos–the division of land that functions as the basis of politics and society–as something that technology has augmented with the “nomos of the Cloud”: Earth, Cloud, City, Address, Interface, and User. He discusses each of these layers in detail, touching on issues of politics, statehood, communication, and identity. He concludes by suggesting that there might be other layers, or that layers may mix. He characterizes the current surveillance regime as an inverse panopticon, promoting exhibitionism and bad faith, and he warns of a post-Athropocene era in which machines wouldn’t be hostile to humanity, but indifferent.

Clips

Ben Bratton Master Class 1-clip_10262
Ben Bratton Master Class 1-clip_10262
M. Casey Rehm introduces Ben Bratton, framing this lecture as the first of three presentations for the Architecture,...
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Ben Bratton Master Class 1-clip_10263
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Ben Bratton Master Class 1-clip_10264
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Ben Bratton Master Class 1-clip_10265
Ben Bratton continues his discussion of the "nomos of the Cloud" with remarks on the layer of the City, noting Giorgio...
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Ben Bratton Master Class 1-clip_10266

Right Now Session 3 Aberrations Synthetics & Weird Nature

Marcelyn Gow prefaces the session by asking what the terms aberration (“straying or wandering from a proper course or position”) and weird (“the agency by which events are predetermined”) might mean right now. Ferda Kolatan argues that in the absence of generally accepted norms, it’s hard to speak of deviations. Lucy McRae discusses how her work explores new possibilities of human/machine interaction. Theodore Spyropoulos characterizes his own work as less a pursuit of weirdness than an engagement with new, everyday realities. Rhett Russo discusses his experiments to find hands-off ways of working with ceramics. M. Casey Rehm discusses his augmented mirror, and photo-manipulation works as part of larger cultural practices. The panelists discuss strategies of overtness or subtlety in terms of engagement, user interaction, and open extensive simulations versus reductive abstractions.

Clips

Right Now Session 3 Aberrations Synthetics & Weird...
Right Now Session 3 Aberrations Synthetics & Weird Nature-clip_10165
Right Now Session 3 Aberrations Synthetics & Weird...
Right Now Session 3 Aberrations Synthetics & Weird Nature-clip_10166
Themes: ,
Marcelyn Gow presents clips of videos by Lucy McRae, Theodore Spyropoulos (Minimaforms), and M. Casey Rehm (Studio Kinch).
Right Now Session 3 Aberrations Synthetics & Weird...
Right Now Session 3 Aberrations Synthetics & Weird Nature-clip_10167
Right Now Session 3 Aberrations Synthetics & Weird...
Right Now Session 3 Aberrations Synthetics & Weird Nature-clip_10168
Theodore Spyropoulos characterizes his own work as less a pursuit of weirdness than an engagement with the new, shared everyday...
Right Now Session 3 Aberrations Synthetics & Weird...
Right Now Session 3 Aberrations Synthetics & Weird Nature-clip_10169

Right Now Session 3 Aberrations Synthetics & Weird Nature-clip_10167

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Marcelyn Gow asks the panelists if they view their work in terms of the aberrant or the weird. Ferda Kolatan argues that in the absence of a generally accepted norm, it’s hard to speak of deviations. Rhett Russo suggests that the meaning of technology is changing, and it’s important to ask questions about the new objects and situations around us. Lucy McRae discusses how her work starts with her own body, as a way of exploring new possibilities of human/machine interaction.


Right Now Session 3 Aberrations Synthetics & Weird Nature-clip_10168

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Theodore Spyropoulos characterizes his own work as less a pursuit of weirdness than an engagement with the new, shared everyday reality. Rhett Russo discusses his experiments to find empty-content, hands-off ways of working with ceramics. M. Casey Rehm sees his augmented mirror, and photo-manipulation works as part of larger cultural practices. Ferda Kolatan objects that the values of engagement and access aren’t absolute, and argues for an appreciation of the hidden and inaccessible.


ACADIA Conference Panel At SCI-Arc Design Aesthetics in the Digital Age-clip_9606

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Greg Otto welcomes everyone to the Association for Computer Aided Design in Architecture (ACADIA)’s panel discussion of the current state of design and design tools. Otto introduces the first speaker, Marcelyn Gow.


Jeffrey Kipnis & Eric Owen Moss Look You Got It All Wrong 1-clip_9523

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Jeffrey Kipnis and Eric Owen Moss discuss the importance of designers anticipating what will be technological feasible, stressing the element of wonder or surprise as a core value. To a question about whether new tools help or hinder this wonder, Moss argues it’s a question of seeing where the tools haven’t been. Kipnis suggests that new tools never quite solve the problem they were designed to address, but, rather, create a new mode of practice.


Antón García-Abril Current Work

October 2, 2013 | Video Lecturer:
Introduction by:

Antón García-Abril begins by discussing “Beams,” i.e. projects that involve technology inserted in a site, including the Balancing Act installation at the 2010 Venice Biennale, the Hemeroscopium house in Madrid (2005). In the section “Stones,” he reviews projects that are engaged with their sites, including the Truffle House (2010), a music school in Vista Alegre (2002), the SGAE headquarters (2004), and the Telcel Theatre in Mexico City (2013). In “The Big Bang,” he discusses larger-scale projects including the 2013 Lab Towers proposal for Zhengzhou, and a 2013 proposal to exploit an existing abandoned railroad track to reorganize MIT campus.

 

Clips

Antón García-Abril Current Work-clip_8317
Antón García-Abril Current Work-clip_8317
Marcelo Spina introduces Antón García-Abril as a European architect at MIT, whose work through Ensemble Studio is...
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Antón García-Abril Current Work-clip_8318
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Antón García-Abril Current Work-clip_8320
Antón García-Abril discusses several larger-scale projects including an installation for the Shanghai Biennale (2013), the 2013...

Alex McDowell-clip_7216

View the Full Video: Alex McDowell
April 4, 2012 | Video Lecturer:

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Alex McDowell discusses his work on the film Fight Club and the process involved in creating the sets. He also shows images of and talks about his recent work on a robot opera, Death and the Powers, with MIT. A large challenge for the opera was to create an emotive experience for the audience using robotic gesture and interdisciplinary creativity.