Video Archive | Technology (158)

Ben Van Berkel And Hernan Diaz Alonso Duel And...
Ben van Berkel responds to comments from the audience on keeping up with technology, keeping lawyers out of the building process,...
Ray Kappe And Hernan Diaz Alonso Duel And Duet-clip_10534
To Hernan Diaz Alonso's question about the reading of "SCI-Arc" as "Science-Architecture," Ray Kappe describes the start of his...
Ray Kappe And Hernan Diaz Alonso Duel And Duet-clip_10535
Hernan Diaz Alonso asks Ray Kappe about balancing the individual and the collective, and the interplay of friction and...
Ben Bratton Master Class 1
Ben Bratton characterizes this and the two upcoming talks as complimentary to his forthcoming book, The Stack: On Software...
Right Now Session 3 Aberrations Synthetics & Weird...
Marcelyn Gow asks the panelists if they view their work in terms of the aberrant or the weird. Ferda Kolatan argues that in the...
Right Now Session 3 Aberrations Synthetics & Weird...
Theodore Spyropoulos characterizes his own work as less a pursuit of weirdness than an engagement with the new, shared everyday...
Right Now Session 3 Aberrations Synthetics & Weird...
Marcelyn Gow prefaces the session by asking what the terms aberration ("straying or wandering from a proper course or...
ACADIA Conference Panel At SCI-Arc Design Aesthetics in...
Greg Otto welcomes everyone to the Association for Computer Aided Design in Architecture (ACADIA)'s panel discussion of the...

Ben Van Berkel And Hernan Diaz Alonso Duel And Duet-clip_10616

Subclip

Ben van Berkel responds to comments from the audience on keeping up with technology, keeping lawyers out of the building process, intuition. Van Berkel notes that architects still have the power to optimize the work of engineers, through editing and making connections.


Ray Kappe And Hernan Diaz Alonso Duel And Duet-clip_10534

Subclip

To Hernan Diaz Alonso’s question about the reading of “SCI-Arc” as “Science-Architecture,” Ray Kappe describes the start of his interest in teaching, the experimental program at Cal Poly Pomona which led to the founding of SCI-Arc. Kappe stresses the revolutionary culture of the late 1960s and early 1970s, and the architectural experiments of Archigram, Stirling and others contributing to the sense that the original participants in SCI-Arc were free to invent a totally new way of learning. He notes their openness in bringing people in to teach a wide variety of topics.


Ray Kappe And Hernan Diaz Alonso Duel And Duet-clip_10535

Subclip

Hernan Diaz Alonso asks Ray Kappe about balancing the individual and the collective, and the interplay of friction and collaboration in the later history of SCI-Arc. Kappe describes how his disinterest in the historical reference side of postmodernism led, in the early 1980s, to creating within SCI-Arc the Futures Institute, as an alternative. By the time he stepped down from the directorship in 1987, he felt more confident about the state of architecture culture, thanks to firms like Morphosis.


Ben Bratton Master Class 1

October 15, 2015 | Video Lecturer:
Introduction by:

Ben Bratton characterizes this and the two upcoming talks as complimentary to his forthcoming book, The Stack: On Software and Sovereignty. He characterizes Carl Schmitt’s concept of nomos–the division of land that functions as the basis of politics and society–as something that technology has augmented with the “nomos of the Cloud”: Earth, Cloud, City, Address, Interface, and User. He discusses each of these layers in detail, touching on issues of politics, statehood, communication, and identity. He concludes by suggesting that there might be other layers, or that layers may mix. He characterizes the current surveillance regime as an inverse panopticon, promoting exhibitionism and bad faith, and he warns of a post-Athropocene era in which machines wouldn’t be hostile to humanity, but indifferent.

Clips

Ben Bratton Master Class 1-clip_10262
Ben Bratton Master Class 1-clip_10262
M. Casey Rehm introduces Ben Bratton, framing this lecture as the first of three presentations for the Architecture,...
Ben Bratton Master Class 1-clip_10263
Ben Bratton Master Class 1-clip_10263
Ben Bratton Master Class 1-clip_10264
Ben Bratton Master Class 1-clip_10264
Ben Bratton Master Class 1-clip_10265
Ben Bratton Master Class 1-clip_10265
Ben Bratton continues his discussion of the "nomos of the Cloud" with remarks on the layer of the City, noting Giorgio...
Ben Bratton Master Class 1-clip_10266
Ben Bratton Master Class 1-clip_10266

Right Now Session 3 Aberrations Synthetics & Weird Nature-clip_10167

Subclip

Marcelyn Gow asks the panelists if they view their work in terms of the aberrant or the weird. Ferda Kolatan argues that in the absence of a generally accepted norm, it’s hard to speak of deviations. Rhett Russo suggests that the meaning of technology is changing, and it’s important to ask questions about the new objects and situations around us. Lucy McRae discusses how her work starts with her own body, as a way of exploring new possibilities of human/machine interaction.


Right Now Session 3 Aberrations Synthetics & Weird Nature-clip_10168

Subclip

Theodore Spyropoulos characterizes his own work as less a pursuit of weirdness than an engagement with the new, shared everyday reality. Rhett Russo discusses his experiments to find empty-content, hands-off ways of working with ceramics. M. Casey Rehm sees his augmented mirror, and photo-manipulation works as part of larger cultural practices. Ferda Kolatan objects that the values of engagement and access aren’t absolute, and argues for an appreciation of the hidden and inaccessible.


Right Now Session 3 Aberrations Synthetics & Weird Nature

Marcelyn Gow prefaces the session by asking what the terms aberration (“straying or wandering from a proper course or position”) and weird (“the agency by which events are predetermined”) might mean right now. Ferda Kolatan argues that in the absence of generally accepted norms, it’s hard to speak of deviations. Lucy McRae discusses how her work explores new possibilities of human/machine interaction. Theodore Spyropoulos characterizes his own work as less a pursuit of weirdness than an engagement with new, everyday realities. Rhett Russo discusses his experiments to find hands-off ways of working with ceramics. M. Casey Rehm discusses his augmented mirror, and photo-manipulation works as part of larger cultural practices. The panelists discuss strategies of overtness or subtlety in terms of engagement, user interaction, and open extensive simulations versus reductive abstractions.

Clips

Right Now Session 3 Aberrations Synthetics & Weird...
Right Now Session 3 Aberrations Synthetics & Weird Nature-clip_10165
Right Now Session 3 Aberrations Synthetics & Weird...
Right Now Session 3 Aberrations Synthetics & Weird Nature-clip_10166
Themes: ,
Marcelyn Gow presents clips of videos by Lucy McRae, Theodore Spyropoulos (Minimaforms), and M. Casey Rehm (Studio Kinch).
Right Now Session 3 Aberrations Synthetics & Weird...
Right Now Session 3 Aberrations Synthetics & Weird Nature-clip_10167
Right Now Session 3 Aberrations Synthetics & Weird...
Right Now Session 3 Aberrations Synthetics & Weird Nature-clip_10168
Theodore Spyropoulos characterizes his own work as less a pursuit of weirdness than an engagement with the new, shared everyday...
Right Now Session 3 Aberrations Synthetics & Weird...
Right Now Session 3 Aberrations Synthetics & Weird Nature-clip_10169

ACADIA Conference Panel At SCI-Arc Design Aesthetics in the Digital Age-clip_9606

Subclip

Greg Otto welcomes everyone to the Association for Computer Aided Design in Architecture (ACADIA)’s panel discussion of the current state of design and design tools. Otto introduces the first speaker, Marcelyn Gow.