Video Archive | Urban design (104)

Michael Sorkin How Green Is My City-clip_9576
Michael Sorkin outlines the current state of urban life worldwide, arguing that even as the globe becomes urbanized, the city as...
Michael Sorkin How Green Is My City-clip_9578
Michael Sorkin outlines his research into ways of enabling New York City to produce its own food.
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Michael Sorkin discusses projects for new cities: Weed, Arizona (1994), Houguan Lake Ecological City (2010) and Qingtan Lake...
Michael Sorkin How Green Is My City
Michael Sorkin argues that as the globe urbanizes, the city as a sustainable, equitable and beautiful site of social...
Sarah Whiting Engaging Autonomy-clip_8384
Sarah Whiting discusses "Notes around the Doppler Effect and Other Moods of Modernism," an article in Perspecta #33,...
Keller Easterling Extrastatecraft-clip_8010
Keller Easterling discusses the current global proliferation of generic urban environments, which she calls "matrix...
Pier Vittorio Aureli Theory And Ethos-clip_7902
Pier Vittorio Aureli notes that Corbusier's 1923 Towards an Architecture was originally titled Architecture or...
Pier Vittorio Aureli Theory And Ethos
Pier Vittorio Aureli warns the audience that his lecture will be the first presentation of his introduction to an upcoming book...

Michael Sorkin How Green Is My City-clip_9576

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Michael Sorkin outlines the current state of urban life worldwide, arguing that even as the globe becomes urbanized, the city as a sustainable, equitable and beautiful site of social possibilities is in danger of disappearing. He insists that the master plan remains a necessary tool for designers.


Michael Sorkin How Green Is My City

October 13, 2014 | Video Lecturer:
Introduction by:

Michael Sorkin argues that as the globe urbanizes, the city as a sustainable, equitable and beautiful site of social possibilities is disappearing. He discusses his projects for new cities in Arizona and China, and describes his research into ways of enabling New York City to produce its own food.

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Eric Owen Moss introduces Michael Sorkin as an author, architect, planner, and educator who defies the convention of...

Sarah Whiting Engaging Autonomy-clip_8384

View the Full Video: Sarah Whiting Engaging Autonomy
November 6, 2013 | Video Lecturer:

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Sarah Whiting discusses “Notes around the Doppler Effect and Other Moods of Modernism,” an article in Perspecta #33, 2002, which she wrote with Robert Somol to attack the anti-object trend as critical posing, derived from simplistic opposition between object and context. As a counter-example of how objects and context interrelate, she discusses her research into the development of IIT campus within the context of Chicago’s South Side.


Keller Easterling Extrastatecraft-clip_8010

View the Full Video: Keller Easterling Extrastatecraft
March 13, 2013 | Video Lecturer:

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Keller Easterling discusses the current global proliferation of generic urban environments, which she calls “matrix space.” Though promoted by “quants and McKinsey consultants,” these projects are often unprofitable, and unsustainable. Easterling stresses how they tend to leave spatial forms as their only and most enduring legacy. She argues that architects need to augment their knowledge of object form with skills in developing active forms–designing systems of growth and contagion. She cites the rule-based, open-ended Oglethorpe Plan for Savannah as a precedent.


Pier Vittorio Aureli Theory And Ethos-clip_7902

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Pier Vittorio Aureli notes that Corbusier’s 1923 Towards an Architecture was originally titled Architecture or Revolution. He describes Corbusier’s Dom-ino plan of a basic building unit as a single pixel in an urban screen. Aureli describes post-World War II Athens as “a lava flow” created by multiplication of a Dom-ino-like polykatoikia basic building type, which was encouraged by municipal building codes. In contemporary Athens Aureli sees a realization of Archizoom’s infrastructural grid, stripped of utopianism. Aureli concludes that design is not enough, and that it might be necessary for architects to abandon the idea of the project in order to engage the urban totality.


Pier Vittorio Aureli Theory And Ethos

January 23, 2013 | Video Lecturer:
Introduction by:

Pier Vittorio Aureli warns the audience that his lecture will be the first presentation of his introduction to an upcoming book on the history of the architectural project. He begins by defining architectural form as a representation of ethos, in the sense of character but also in the sense of shared habits and beliefs. The earliest concept of the architectural project–a mediation between the designer and the builder–can be seen in Vitruvius. Aureli describes the rebirth of European cities in the 10th-12th centuries in terms of their significance shifting from military to economic functions, and describes perspective, as developed by Alberti and Brunelleschi as a technique of measuring and ordering space. Aureli identifies Sebastiano Serlio’s early 16th century book on domestic architecture as an illustration of the moment when the architectural plan became the central organizational device for buildings and the city, and see it applied in Paris at the Place des Vosges (1605) and Place Vendôme (1699), and the Nolli map of Rome (1748). Aureli points out how Pierre Patte’s late 18th century drawings of Paris employ the section view to reveal infrastructure services such as sewers. Aureli discusses Nicholas de La Mare, whose 1707 Traité de la Police extends the concept of controlling and organizing the city from construction to services. He goes on to discuss Ildefons Cerdà’s 1859 plan for the extension of Barcelona as the first plan based on data, designed to maximize circulation. Aureli notes that Corbusier’s 1923 Towards an Architecture was originally titled Architecture or Revolution. He describes Corbusier’s Dom-ino plan of a basic building unit as a single pixel in an urban screen. Aureli describes post-World War II Athens as “a lava flow” created by multiplication of a Dom-ino-like polykatoikia basic building type, which was encouraged by municipal building codes. In contemporary Athens Aureli sees a realization of Archizoom’s infrastructural grid, stripped of utopianism. Aureli concludes that design is not enough, and that it might be necessary for architects to abandon the idea of the project in order to engage the urban totality.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Clips

Pier Vittorio Aureli Theory And Ethos-clip_7897
Pier Vittorio Aureli Theory And Ethos-clip_7897
Todd Gannon introduces Pier Vittorio Aureli as both a practicing architect--in the firm Dogma, with Martino Tattara--and as the...
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