Video Archive | Urban planning (157)

Antoni Vives Barcelona 5.0 Polis Is Back-clip_8561
Antoni Vives reviews some of the principles guiding planning and development in Barcelona, stressing productivity, mobility,...
Antoni Vives Barcelona 5.0 Polis Is Back-clip_8560
Antoni Vives argues that city-building and city-transforming today is essentially a political, i.e. ideological task. It requires...
Antoni Vives Barcelona 5.0 Polis Is Back
Antoni Vives argues that city-building and city-transforming today is essentially a political, i.e. ideological task. He sees...
Kenneth Frampton & Eric Owen Moss Dialectical...
To Eric Owen Moss's suggestion that the idea of critical regionalism might be a non sequitur, Kenneth Frampton responds that...
Sarah Whiting Engaging Autonomy
Sarah Whiting begins by identifying a trend in current architecture in which both theory and the object are minimized. She argues...
Tom Gilmore The City Chair-clip_7975
Tom Gilmore outlines why cities matter. He characterizes them as civilization's repositories of information. He discusses various...
Peter Trummer-clip_7383
Peter Trummer discusses his disciplinary approach and describes the influence of Jeffrey Kipnis and Sanford Kwinter. He discusses...
Peter Trummer-clip_7384
Peter Trummer discusses the urban fabric and the expansion of the grid in Mexico City. Trummer proposes an idea of collective...

Antoni Vives Barcelona 5.0 Polis Is Back-clip_8561

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Antoni Vives reviews some of the principles guiding planning and development in Barcelona, stressing productivity, mobility, inclusiveness, connectivity, self-sufficiency, and collaboration with existing communities. He describes efforts to bring high-tech  industries to Barcelona as generators of fabrication, transforming a hardware city into a software city.


Antoni Vives Barcelona 5.0 Polis Is Back-clip_8560

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Antoni Vives argues that city-building and city-transforming today is essentially a political, i.e. ideological task. It requires political will, realism, and making choices. He sees Barcelona’s future being based on revival of the polis, a healthier, more affordable, more efficient civic life. Vives outlines the history of Barcelona from the Roman colony, stressing the defining interventions of Ildefons Cerdà in the 19th century. He describes the current planning situation as a combination of big visions and large-scale plans with human-scale “urban acupuncture.”


Antoni Vives Barcelona 5.0 Polis Is Back

February 12, 2014 | Video Lecturer:
Introduction by:

Antoni Vives argues that city-building and city-transforming today is essentially a political, i.e. ideological task. He sees Barcelona’s future being based on revival of the polis, a healthier, more affordable, more efficient civic life. Vives outlines the history of Barcelona from the Roman colony, stressing the defining interventions of Ildefons Cerda in the 19th century. He reviews some of the principles guiding planning and development in Barcelona, stressing productivity, mobility, inclusiveness, connectivity, self-sufficiency, and collaboration with existing communities. He describes efforts to bring high-tech  industries to Barcelona as generators of fabrication, transforming a hardware city into a software city.

 

 

Clips

Antoni Vives Barcelona 5.0 Polis Is Back-clip_8559
Antoni Vives Barcelona 5.0 Polis Is Back-clip_8559
Eric Owen Moss introduces Antoni Vives, the deputy mayor of Barcelona, as a utopian pragmatist: the precise combination needed to...
Antoni Vives Barcelona 5.0 Polis Is Back-clip_8560
Antoni Vives Barcelona 5.0 Polis Is Back-clip_8560
Antoni Vives Barcelona 5.0 Polis Is Back-clip_8561
Antoni Vives Barcelona 5.0 Polis Is Back-clip_8561

Kenneth Frampton & Eric Owen Moss Dialectical Lyric-clip_8411

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To Eric Owen Moss’s suggestion that the idea of critical regionalism might be a non sequitur, Kenneth Frampton responds that while vernacular traditions are no longer accessible, architects can use traditional responses to local conditions to respond constructively to the trauma of modernization. Moss and Frampton discuss the 21st century cities and the idea of planning.


Sarah Whiting Engaging Autonomy

November 6, 2013 | Video Lecturer:
Introduction by:

Sarah Whiting begins by identifying a trend in current architecture in which both theory and the object are minimized. She argues this betrays a simplistic sense of object and context, and autonomy and relations. As a counter-example, she discusses IIT campus within the context of Chicago’s South Side, and her own projects–including a facade study for twelve towers in Xingsha, and entries in the Kaohsiung Pop Music Center competition (2010), and the Taichung Cultural Center (2013), and the Golden House (2010).

Clips

Sarah Whiting Engaging Autonomy-clip_8382
Sarah Whiting Engaging Autonomy-clip_8382
Themes:
Eric Owen Moss introduces Sarah Whiting with a poem celebrating her work as a designer, and her guidance of Rice's architecture...
Sarah Whiting Engaging Autonomy-clip_8383
Sarah Whiting Engaging Autonomy-clip_8383
Sarah Whiting Engaging Autonomy-clip_8384
Sarah Whiting Engaging Autonomy-clip_8384
Sarah Whiting Engaging Autonomy-clip_8385
Sarah Whiting Engaging Autonomy-clip_8385

Tom Gilmore The City Chair-clip_7975

View the Full Video: Tom Gilmore The City Chair
February 13, 2013 | Video Lecturer:

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Tom Gilmore outlines why cities matter. He characterizes them as civilization’s repositories of information. He discusses various cities around the world in terms of being ascendant, declining, bi-polar, and faux, while stressing that cities evolve constantly and they evolve incrementally. He sees most planning disasters as the result of imposing change wholesale, rather than building by building. He insists that his sense of context is much more complex than simply the history of a place, but involving constantly-changing social, cultural, technological, economic and other forces.


Peter Trummer-clip_7383

View the Full Video: Peter Trummer
February 22, 2012 | Video Lecturer:

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Peter Trummer discusses his disciplinary approach and describes the influence of Jeffrey Kipnis and Sanford Kwinter. He discusses how to turn a materialist approach to architecture into a disciplinary task, specifically regarding the aggregated figure and its unfolded ground.  He discusses form not as a means of representation but as an investigation into the dynamics, material circumstances, and organizational patterns.