Videos (957)

Patrik Schumacher Tom Wiscombe Duel + Duet
Patrik Schumacher discusses current developments of generative design, illustrating points with recent Zaha Hadid Architects...
Benjamin H Bratton Presentation of The Stack
Benjamin H. Bratton cites dozens of headlines from the news that touch on issues he has addressed in his new book, The Stack:...
Jeffrey Kipnis Why Bother The Director’s Cut Part 1...
Jeffrey Kipnis proposes that the architecture's value lies in work characterized by hysteria, and a passion for the...
Benjamin J Smith Architecture As Conviction Vapid...
Benjamin J. Smith discusses his interest in architecture that creates experiences where people can perceive themselves...
Ben Van Berkel And Hernan Diaz Alonso Duel And Duet
Ben van Berkel discusses in depth the Arnheim rail station (1996-2015), from the initial research, through UN Studio's work with...
Farshid Moussavi Lecture
Farshid Moussavi proposes that style is about how elements in their multiplicity are experienced in everyday life. She...
Close Up Exhibit Panel Discussion
Mark Julius Garcia, Hernan Diaz Alsonso and David Ruy discuss the SCI-Arc Gallery's current exhibit "Close-Up," that...
Brett Steele Picking Up Where I Left Off
Brett Steele characterizes thesis projects as Trojan horses that make existing architecture irrelevant. They also invent a...

Patrik Schumacher Tom Wiscombe Duel + Duet

May 17, 2016 | Video Lecturer: ,
Introduction by:

Patrik Schumacher discusses current developments of generative design, illustrating points with recent Zaha Hadid Architects projects including the Galaxy Soho in Beijing, the Central Bank of Iraq, and the Petroleum Studies and Research Center. He stresses how parametric design not only produces highly efficient buildings in terms of structure, materials and functionality, but also generates vital but coherent urban spaces. Tom Wiscombe argues, in contrast, that the task of architecture is to create something so alien that it cannot be consumed, illustrating his points with recent projects including the Guggenheim Helsinki, the Griffith Park House, Diamond City in Adelaide, the Kinmen Passenger Service Center, and the Main Museum of Los Angeles Art. He argues for a flat ontology, against hierarchical or sequential organization, and proposes deeper engagement with the architectural detail. In conversation, Schumacher challenges Wiscombe to defend his work as something more than personal creations, and Wiscombe challenges Schumacher’s promotion of a single formal vocabulary. The two speakers respond to audience comments regarding collage, deriving general rules from specific designs, expressing or not expressing structure, formalism and parametric engagement with the social.

Clips

Patrik Schumacher Tom Wiscombe Duel + Duet-clip_10664
Patrik Schumacher Tom Wiscombe Duel + Duet-clip_10664
Hernan Diaz Alonso frames this Duel and/or Duet with Patrik Schumacher and Tom Wiscombe as an appropriately intense start to the...
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Patrik Schumacher Tom Wiscombe Duel + Duet-clip_10665
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Patrik Schumacher Tom Wiscombe Duel + Duet-clip_10666
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Patrik Schumacher Tom Wiscombe Duel + Duet-clip_10667
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Patrik Schumacher Tom Wiscombe Duel + Duet-clip_10668

Benjamin H Bratton Presentation of The Stack

April 13, 2016 | Video Lecturer:
Introduction by:

Benjamin H. Bratton cites dozens of headlines from the news that touch on issues he has addressed in his new book, The Stack: On Software and Sovereignty. He argues that a disruptive “delamination of jurisdiction from geography” is underway, brought about by discrete networks and platforms of global computation that he calls The Stack. For Bratton, the Stack consists of Earth, Cloud, City, Address, Interface, and User. He discusses each of these layers in detail, concluding with thoughts on the Stack of the future. While acknowledging that current ecological, sectarian and financial emergencies could lead to a regressive Cloud feudalism, he offers hope that robust, inhuman artificial intelligence may finally clear the air of self-destructive humanist daydreams.

Clips

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Benjamin H Bratton Presentation of The Stack-clip_10647
Hernan Diaz Alonso introduces Benjamin H. Bratton as a multi-disciplinary "field expander."
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Benjamin H Bratton Presentation of The Stack-clip_10648
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Benjamin H Bratton Presentation of The Stack-clip_10651

Jeffrey Kipnis Why Bother The Director’s Cut Part 1 In Praise Of The Project

April 6, 2016 | Video Lecturer:
Introduction by:

Jeffrey Kipnis proposes that the architecture’s value lies in work characterized by hysteria, and a passion for the backstory. Kipnis presents a vitalist matter theory approach to reality and experience, and reviews competing concepts of value. He acknowledges the usefulness of autobiographical and biographical strategies for interpreting work, but declares he does neither. He discusses the pentimenti of Velázquez, Hamlet’s “To be or not to be” soliloquy as a performance, and Deleuze’s concept of the body without organs. Kipnis discusses significant backstories of specific projects, including OMA’s Très Grande Bibliothèque, the Guggenheim Helsinki Design Competition, the Kukje Gallery by Florian Idenburg and Jing Liu, and Anna Neimark and Andrew Atwood’s entry in the 2016 P.S.1 competition.

 

Clips

Jeffrey Kipnis Why Bother The Director’s Cut Part 1...
Jeffrey Kipnis Why Bother The Director’s Cut Part 1 In Praise Of The Project-clip_10630
Jeffrey Kipnis Why Bother The Director’s Cut Part 1...
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Jeffrey Kipnis Why Bother The Director’s Cut Part 1...
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Jeffrey Kipnis Why Bother The Director’s Cut Part 1...
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Hernan Diaz Alonso introduces Jeffrey Kipnis with Joseph Quetglas's description of Manfredo Tafuri as a voice that produces its...

Benjamin J Smith Architecture As Conviction Vapid Potential Or Rigorous Consequence

April 1, 2016 | Video Lecturer:
Introduction by:

Benjamin J. Smith discusses his interest in architecture that creates experiences where people can perceive themselves perceiving. He discusses experiences of vertical circulation, both in actual spaces and VR representations. Smith discusses time-based media in architecture in four categories: visualizations of the design process, “trailers” that establish a narrative, short films that situate aesthetic properties, and media installations. He concludes with a video of his own media installation featuring video feedback, user interaction, and language.

Clips

Benjamin J Smith Architecture As Conviction Vapid...
Benjamin J Smith Architecture As Conviction Vapid Potential Or Rigorous Consequence-clip_10637
Marcelyn Gow introduces Benjamin J. Smith, the second SCI-Arc Design of Theory Fellow (for 2014-5).
Benjamin J Smith Architecture As Conviction Vapid...
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Benjamin J Smith Architecture As Conviction Vapid...
Benjamin J Smith Architecture As Conviction Vapid Potential Or Rigorous Consequence-clip_10639
Benjamin J Smith Architecture As Conviction Vapid...
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Benjamin J Smith Architecture As Conviction Vapid...
Benjamin J Smith Architecture As Conviction Vapid Potential Or Rigorous Consequence-clip_10641

Ben Van Berkel And Hernan Diaz Alonso Duel And Duet

Ben van Berkel discusses in depth the Arnheim rail station (1996-2015), from the initial research, through UN Studio’s work with consultants, specialists and eight separate clients over twenty years to nudge a proposed train station into an “integral transfer location” that positively intensifies the experience of travelers. In response to questions from Hernan Diaz Alonso, Ben van Berkel discusss sustaining momentum. He stresses the need to be open to the possibilities of any style–minimal or maximal. He describes his office as being organized around recording, organizing and sharing ideas and discoveries. He agrees that architects today are stretched in many directions, but there’s still the possibility enhancing the utility and cultural effects of a project.

Clips

Ben Van Berkel And Hernan Diaz Alonso Duel And...
Ben Van Berkel And Hernan Diaz Alonso Duel And Duet-clip_10613
Hernan Diaz Alonso introduces Ben van Berkel as an architect who negotiates with the traditions and conventions of the discipline...
Ben Van Berkel And Hernan Diaz Alonso Duel And...
Ben Van Berkel And Hernan Diaz Alonso Duel And Duet-clip_10614
Ben Van Berkel And Hernan Diaz Alonso Duel And...
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Ben Van Berkel And Hernan Diaz Alonso Duel And...
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Ben van Berkel responds to comments from the audience on keeping up with technology, keeping lawyers out of the building process,...

Farshid Moussavi Lecture

March 28, 2016 | Video Lecturer:
Introduction by:

Farshid Moussavi proposes that style is about how elements in their multiplicity are experienced in everyday life. She illustrates her argument with several projects, including the John Lewis department store and cineplex, The Yokohama international port terminal, La Folie Divine residential tower in Montpellier, the Museum of Contemporary Art in Cleveland, the Victoria Beckham flagship store, and the mid-size office tower, 130 Fenchurch Street in London. She discusses the projects in terms of multiple elements assembled to engage users. In a discussion following the lecture, Moussavi and Elena Manferdini discuss the question of architecture’s audience, finish, color, and the role of the architect today. Moussavi argues that, despite the complexities of the contemporary collaborative building process, architects still have agency, and the ability to explore and invent.

 

Clips

Farshid Moussavi Lecture-clip_10603
Farshid Moussavi Lecture-clip_10603
Elena Manferdini introduces Farshid Moussavi as an architect who has not only created challenging buildings, but created a...
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Farshid Moussavi Lecture-clip_10607

Close Up Exhibit Panel Discussion

Mark Julius Garcia, Hernan Diaz Alsonso and David Ruy discuss the SCI-Arc Gallery’s current exhibit “Close-Up,” that examines the state of the architectural detail in an era of continuous magnification. Ruy stresses that the exhibit highlights practices that claim authorship of details at a time when details are increasingly standardized. The panelists also discuss virtuosity, tools, and technique. Garcia summarizes the exhibition as,”Form, style, aesthetics, and beautiful things.”

Clips

Close Up Exhibit Panel Discussion-clip_10595
Close Up Exhibit Panel Discussion-clip_10595
Hernan Diaz Alonso introduces Mark Julius Garcia, participating in a discussion of the SCI-Arc Gallery's current exhibit...
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Close Up Exhibit Panel Discussion-clip_10596
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Brett Steele Picking Up Where I Left Off

March 25, 2016 | Video Lecturer:
Introduction by:

Brett Steele characterizes thesis projects as Trojan horses that make existing architecture irrelevant. They also invent a distinctive way of being an architect. He cites the case Charles-Édouard Jeanneret-Gris, moving from Switzerland to Paris, renaming himself Le Corbusier, and producing the Dom-ino house plan in 1914. He notes how Corbusier’s publications established a precedent for later architects. Steele argues that architecture schools are important as stages where people can rehearse and refine their performance as architects. He stresses that the architect’s task of communication today must deal with information overload–hence editing is the essential skill. He discusses projects by Philip Johnson, Robert Venturi, Koolhaas, and Toyo Ito that provided a launch pad for their subsequent careers

Clips

Brett Steele Picking Up Where I Left Off-clip_10590
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Brett Steele Picking Up Where I Left Off-clip_10588
Hernan Diaz Alonso introduces Brett Steele, comparing the collaboration between the AA and SCI-Arc to The Avengers movie.
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Brett Steele Picking Up Where I Left Off-clip_10589
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