Videos | Yearly Archives: 1976 (28)

Which Way To The Future
Shelly Kappe moderates a panel consisting of Charles Moore, Frank Gehry, Helmut Schulitz, Peter de Bretteville, Roland Coate, and...
The Role Of The Large Office Part One
Shelly Kappe introduces panelists Cesar Pelli, Frank Dimster, Louis Naidorf, David Martin, Charles Kanner, and Tony Lumsden. The...
The Role Of The Large Office Part Two
The concluding 26 minutes of exhange between the panelists and the audience on the social responsibilities of the architect.
Paul Goldberger
The first few seconds have no sound. Los Angeles AIA president Henry Silvestri hands out awards, and introduces Bernard...
Jim Hull
Glen Small introduces Jim Hull. Hull reviews the most recent six years of his industrial furniture design work. After having...
Harwell Hamilton Harris
Harwell Hamilton Harris discusses his early projects, covering topics such as material applications, construction techniques and...
Charles Jencks Recent Italian And Japanese Architecture
Charles Jencks continues his 1976 lecture series by discussing Italian architecture's current direction and how it differs from...
Charles Jencks The Language Of Modern Architecture
Charles Jencks discusses the roles in which linguistics and syntax play in modern, postmodern, and Art Nouveau architecture. He...

Which Way To The Future

Shelly Kappe moderates a panel consisting of Charles Moore, Frank Gehry, Helmut Schulitz, Peter de Bretteville, Roland Coate, and Glen Small. They discuss their ideas about the future. This Fall 1976 series was supported by a grant from the Graham Foundation. Moore emphasizes the importance of the past. Gehry proposes new material possibilities. Schulitz questions the values of contemporary commercial society. De Bretteville discusses complexity and its various forms in architecture. Coate discusses diversity in the world of architecture, proposing that the discipline of architecture will cross traditional boundaries and link with other fields and disciplines, citing Christo, Robert Irwin, and Frank Gehry. Small teases his fellow panelists and labels each with a nickname. He discusses his work on the Biomorphic Biosphere. The tape ends before he finishes.

 

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Charles Moore emphasizes the importance of the past. Grank Gehry proposes new material possibilities. Schulitz questions the...
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Which Way To The Future-clip_3903

The Role Of The Large Office Part One

Shelly Kappe introduces panelists Cesar Pelli, Frank Dimster, Louis Naidorf, David Martin, Charles Kanner, and Tony Lumsden. The topic is social responsibility, and the roles which both small and larger offices have. The panelists discuss their views surrounding social responsibility. The audience asks the panelists questions. Topics include research and development being done within large offices today, site selection of the central library, and education.

Clips

The Role Of The Large Office Part One-clip_5742
The Role Of The Large Office Part One-clip_5742
Shelly Kappe introduces panelists Cesar Pelli, Frank Dimster, Lou Naidorf, David Martin, Charles Kanner, and Tony Lumsden. The...
The Role Of The Large Office Part One-clip_5747
The Role Of The Large Office Part One-clip_5747
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The Role Of The Large Office Part Two

The concluding 26 minutes of exhange between the panelists and the audience on the social responsibilities of the architect.

Clips

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The Role Of The Large Office Part Two-clip_5816

Paul Goldberger

The first few seconds have no sound. Los Angeles AIA president Henry Silvestri hands out awards, and introduces Bernard Zimmerman, who announces some upcoming AIA-sponsored lectures. Frank O. Gehry welcomes Paul Goldberger as a sign that the “Eastern Establishment” is finally taking an interest in Los Angeles. Paul Goldberger begins by observing that SCI-Arc is the third architecture school in California he’s lectured at in the last few days “and it’s the only time I’ve felt I was in a vaguely interesting space.” He quotes the warning against “trust in critics” from Byron’s “English Bards and Scotch Reviewers,” and warns that his talk will be more about journalism and criticism than architecture. He describes his work situation, which artificially equates him with the dance, drama and film critics, even though “buildings are not entertainment.” He sees his role as articulating the forces behind new and proposed buildings and places. He points out the example of residential developer H. R. Shapiro, who was quoted as saying “Architectural amenities are sheer nonsense” a few months before going bankrupt. Goldberger discusses the problematic building designs of the New York phone company and his hopes that his article on their latest will influence them to reconsider the trajectory of their built works. He discusses the role of government in the design review process, suggesting that a simple massing guideline is not enough, but that a full aesthetic review has dangerous potentials. Goldberger gives an example of successfully using his platform at the Times in 1974 to focus public outrage against Harry Helmsley’s proposal to eviscerate the interiors of McKim, Mead & White’s 1882 townhouse for Henry Villard to accomodate a new luxury hotel designed by Emery Roth. The publicity and subsequent design review process resulted in a new design that preserved the integrity of the Villard house.

 

Clips

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Jim Hull

October 6, 1976 | Video Lecturer:

Glen Small introduces Jim Hull. Hull reviews the most recent six years of his industrial furniture design work. After having studied architecture and urban design, Hull decided to move away from these areas into smaller scale furniture and interior projects. Hull describes the methods of fabrication used as well as his interest in recycling industrial materials and producing low cost furniture for cities.

Clips

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Jim Hull describes his furniture design projects developed in the six years prior to the lecture. Hull discusses in detail the...
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Jim Hull discusses the project for a cardboard house which was developed in parallel with a new urban apartment housing system.
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Jim Hull-clip_1465
Themes:
Jim Hull describes the Huddle couch project. He discusses how this project suggested a different way of living, where one piece...
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Jim Hull-clip_1496
Jim Hull answers question regarding motivations as well as his relationship with clients and his interest in designing urban...

Harwell Hamilton Harris

September 17, 1976 | Video Lecturer:
Introduction by:
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Harwell Hamilton Harris discusses his early projects, covering topics such as material applications, construction techniques and budgetary concerns. The majority of the projects presented are residential projects based in 1930’s Southern California. Harris also discusses technical concerns such as radiant heating systems and his interest in responsiveness to local climate. After discussing a series of residential projects in the first part of his lecture, Harris presents a series of larger scale projects including an exhibition hall and a church.

Clips

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Harwell Harris answers an extensive series of questions involving construction and client issues.

Charles Jencks Recent Italian And Japanese Architecture

June 24, 1976 | Video Lecturer:

Charles Jencks continues his 1976 lecture series by discussing Italian architecture’s current direction and how it differs from other movements in Europe, specifically England, during the 1950s through the 1970s. Jencks covers political and social beliefs, technological advances, architecture, and product design to show how and where Italian designers situate themselves. After that, Jencks introduces his next topic, Japanese architecture. Jencks describes some recent works by architects in Japan, and how they are changing the architectural culture. This video ends in the middle of the lecture and is continued on a separate video, Charles Jencks New Japanese Architecture.

Clips

Charles Jencks Recent Italian And Japanese...
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Charles Jencks discusses Japanese architectural developments through the 1970s. He introduces the Metabolists and the views of...
Charles Jencks Recent Italian And Japanese...
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Charles Jencks uses examples from industrial and product design, as well as, the commissions Italian designers get to explain how...
Charles Jencks Recent Italian And Japanese...
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Charles Jencks Recent Italian And Japanese...
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Charles Jencks defends his views during a question and answer session. He responds to questions regarding meaning and signifiers,...
Charles Jencks Recent Italian And Japanese...
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Charles Jencks begins his lecture on contemporary Japanese architecture by describing the schemes and traditions of Japanese...

Charles Jencks The Language Of Modern Architecture

June 6, 1976 | Video Lecturer:

Charles Jencks discusses the roles in which linguistics and syntax play in modern, postmodern, and Art Nouveau architecture. He traces a history of form association and codified semantics aimed at describing an evolution from early twentieth century design to the current (1976) language of architecture. He identifies the modernist dilemma of signifier and signified with the bare forms modernism, and describes how a reintroduction of syntax and the semantic use of historic architectural elements came about to define social status. Throughout the question and answer session, Jencks negotiates through a barrage of skepticism and hostility.

Clips

Charles Jencks The Language Of Modern...
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Charles Jencks The Language Of Modern...
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Charles Jencks The Language Of Modern...
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Charles Jencks paries questions about modernism overshadowing the Art Nouveau movement, the death of Art Nouveau, as well as that...