Videos | Yearly Archives: 1979 (11)

Eric Owen Moss Armageddon Or Polynesian Contextualism...
This video concludes"Eric Owen Moss Armageddon Or Polynesian Contextualism Versus I Like Hardware Stores," continuing Moss'...
Eric Owen Moss Armageddon Or Polynesian Contextualism...
In a lecture titled Armageddon Or Polynesian Contextualism Versus I Like Hardware Stores, Eric Owen Moss discusses his...
Thom Mayne And Michael Rotondi Of Morphosis
Fred Fisher introduces Thom Mayne and Michael Rotondi of Morphosis, noting their prestige within the architectural profession,...
Studio Works Part Two
Robert Mangurian and Craig Hodgetts continue their lecture on their firm Studio Works. Hodgets and Mangurian reflect on their...
Peter De Bretteville
Thom Mayne introduces Peter de Bretteville, who worked with Craig Hodgetts and Eugene Kupper in the firm Works,...
Frank O Gehry Part One
Gehry comments on the current state of architectural discourse as he sees it. He quickly shows about a dozen projects, and then...
Frank O Gehry Part Two
Gehry outlines his intentions on several residential projects, including three studio residences in Venice for Denise Hopper. He...
Frank Dimster
After being introduced by Thom Mayne, Frank Dimster presents his work, which includes a series of single family and multi-family...

Eric Owen Moss Armageddon Or Polynesian Contextualism Part Two

December 5, 1979 | Video Lecturer:

This video concludes”Eric Owen Moss Armageddon Or Polynesian Contextualism Versus I Like Hardware Stores,” continuing Moss’ discussion of the Pin Ball House. He also invites the audience to a second presentation of “The Last Supper” performance at The Architecture Gallery. The video ends with five minutes of silent images of models of space ships in motion, and fields of moving stars.

Clips

Eric Owen Moss Armageddon Or Polynesian Contextualism...
Eric Owen Moss Armageddon Or Polynesian Contextualism Part Two-clip_3840
This video concludes Moss' discussion of the Pin Ball House
Eric Owen Moss Armageddon Or Polynesian Contextualism...
Eric Owen Moss Armageddon Or Polynesian Contextualism Part Two-clip_3842
The video ends with five minutes of silent images of models of space ships in motion, and fields of moving stars.
Eric Owen Moss Armageddon Or Polynesian Contextualism...
Eric Owen Moss Armageddon Or Polynesian Contextualism Part Two-clip_3846
Moss continues his discussion of the Pin Ball House

Eric Owen Moss Armageddon Or Polynesian Contextualism Part One

December 5, 1979 | Video Lecturer:

In a lecture titled Armageddon Or Polynesian Contextualism Versus I Like Hardware Stores, Eric Owen Moss discusses his design theories then reviews their application through a selection of recently completed work. Moss shows models, drawings, and photos to reinforce his architectural methodologies regarding site, context, and building systems. Though the video ends abruptly, Moss articulates his view of signs, metaphors, and associative relationships with his work and the current discourse of dualities and signifiers.

Clips

Eric Owen Moss Armageddon Or Polynesian Contextualism...
Eric Owen Moss Armageddon Or Polynesian Contextualism Part One-clip_2292
The video begins with Thom Mayne finishing his introduction. Eric Moss talks about several projects completed in the past few...
Eric Owen Moss Armageddon Or Polynesian Contextualism...
Eric Owen Moss Armageddon Or Polynesian Contextualism Part One-clip_2293
Eric Owen Moss Armageddon Or Polynesian Contextualism...
Eric Owen Moss Armageddon Or Polynesian Contextualism Part One-clip_2294

Thom Mayne And Michael Rotondi Of Morphosis

November 28, 1979 |
Introduction by:

Fred Fisher introduces Thom Mayne and Michael Rotondi of
Morphosis, noting their prestige within the architectural profession, their dedication to teaching, and their commitment to advancing architecture. Fisher notes that Mayne was responsible for organizing the current lecture series, about which Mayne received “a discouraging word from just about everybody,” but which “stands as a unique and valuable series of events and that we’re all indebted to him for that.” The introduction is followed by a long, silent set-up of the slides. Thom Mayne quotes Colin Rowe from the Five Architects catalog regarding the dual identity of architects as visionaries and victims of circumstance. He mentions the responsive systems approach of Christopher Alexander and Ralph Knowles as examples of what Morphosis is not doing. Michael Rotondi describes the five major interests he and Mayne share: program, environment, technology, structure, and communication, or “the architectural language of project.” The audio is good but the image during this clip is very bad. Mayne and Rotondi present the Delmer House, the Baja Mar vacation house, the Baja California addition to community hospital, and an unbuilt house project in Rochester, New York. Mayne and Rotondi present their project for a house for physician in Nigeria, the 2-4-6-8 studio addition in Venice, and an addition to house in the Palisades. The video ends abruptly, probably just a bit before they actually finished speaking.

Clips

Thom Mayne And Michael Rotondi Of Morphosis-clip_2244
Thom Mayne And Michael Rotondi Of Morphosis-clip_2244
Fred Fisher introduces Thom Mayne and Michael Rotondi of Morphosis, noting their prestige within the architectural profession,...
Thom Mayne And Michael Rotondi Of Morphosis-clip_2246
Thom Mayne And Michael Rotondi Of Morphosis-clip_2246
Thom Mayne And Michael Rotondi Of Morphosis-clip_2247
Thom Mayne And Michael Rotondi Of Morphosis-clip_2247
Mayne and Rotondi present the Delmer House, the Baja Mar vacation house, the Baja California addition to community hospital, and...
Thom Mayne And Michael Rotondi Of Morphosis-clip_2249
Thom Mayne And Michael Rotondi Of Morphosis-clip_2249

Studio Works Part Two

Robert Mangurian and Craig Hodgetts continue their lecture on their firm Studio Works. Hodgets and Mangurian reflect on their shared interest in building models with erector sets or making model airplanes. They explain how this led to their corrugated cardboard furniture, and the collaborative process of the furniture’s fabrication. They emphasize their interest in collaboration and note their desire to create work where the design of a building is participatory; where the design is dictated by putting one part on another in a given order.

Clips

Studio Works Part Two-clip_7063
Studio Works Part Two-clip_7063

Peter De Bretteville

Thom Mayne introduces Peter de Bretteville, who worked with Craig Hodgetts and Eugene Kupper in the firm Works, subsequently practicing on his own and teaching at USC. Peter de Bretteville beings with a joking reference to “the long, painful part” of every architecture lecture that comes before the architect shows his first slide. He engages in some dialogue with the lecture crew about his slides, which have gotten out of order. After announcing that he will speak about his general principles before discussing his work, he stops the lecture to re-organize his slides. De Bretteville resumes his introduction on general principles after a pause. But after a few remarks about the importance of how architecture is “not observed but experienced directly,” he stops the lecture again. De Bretteville discusses an issue arising from modernism that is relevant to his work: the challenge of responding to daylight given the increasing thinness of exterior walls. He shows some strategies for reducing glare and heat in the work of Le Corbusier and Louis I. Kahn, relating them to pre-modern work such as Hadrian’s Villa and Palladio’s Villa Malcontenta. De Bretteville discusses the Willow Glen Houses, two connected steel-frame houses in Laurel Canyon. De Bretteville discusses a remodel of a World Savings bank in Reseda, California, originally designed by Victor Gruen Associates, the Sunset House, built on a spectacular site in the Hollywood Hills, and an unbuilt design for a radical remodel of an “oversized tract house.”

Clips

Peter De Bretteville-clip_2408
Peter De Bretteville-clip_2408
Themes: ,
De Bretteville discusses the unbuilt design for a radical remodel of an "oversized tract house".
Peter De Bretteville-clip_2348
Peter De Bretteville-clip_2348
Peter de Bretteville beings with a joking reference to “the long, painful part” of every architecture lecture that comes...
Peter De Bretteville-clip_2349
Peter De Bretteville-clip_2349
Peter de Bretteville resumes his introduction on general principles after a pause. But after a few remarks about the importance...
Peter De Bretteville-clip_2350
Peter De Bretteville-clip_2350
Peter De Bretteville-clip_2351
Peter De Bretteville-clip_2351

Frank O Gehry Part One

November 7, 1979 |
Introduction by:

Gehry comments on the current state of architectural discourse as he sees it. He quickly shows about a dozen projects, and then goes into more detail about some buildings under way or in the design phase, such as Santa Monica Place. He gives a very detailed description and explanation of his intentions in modifying his house in Santa Monica.

Clips

Frank O Gehry Part One-clip_1337
Frank O Gehry Part One-clip_1337
Before the lecture starts, a member of the Association of Women in Architecture invites everyone to attend the 1979 Member's...
Frank O Gehry Part One-clip_1338
Frank O Gehry Part One-clip_1338
Gehry outlines his search for a personal language, and for his personal version of beauty. He quickly reviews various projects,...
Frank O Gehry Part One-clip_1339
Frank O Gehry Part One-clip_1339
Frank O Gehry Part One-clip_1340
Frank O Gehry Part One-clip_1340
Frank O Gehry Part One-clip_1341
Frank O Gehry Part One-clip_1341

Frank O Gehry Part Two

Gehry outlines his intentions on several residential projects, including three studio residences in Venice for Denise Hopper. He also answers questions about his projects, how he works, and what inspires him to pursue seemingly odd design directions.

Clips

Frank O Gehry Part Two-clip_1343
Frank O Gehry Part Two-clip_1343
Frank O Gehry Part Two-clip_1344
Frank O Gehry Part Two-clip_1344

Frank Dimster

After being introduced by Thom Mayne, Frank Dimster presents his work, which includes a series of single family and multi-family housing projects in California and in the Bahamas. Dimster discusses how important it is to find references and inspiration in history, and to engage with new technology while simultaneously respecting traditional concept and practices. He goes on to describe his projects in terms of spatial arrangement, stressing the attention to flexibility and adaptability of spaces to accommodate for modern living.

Clips

Frank Dimster-clip_2125
Frank Dimster-clip_2125
Frank Dimster-clip_2126
Frank Dimster-clip_2126
Frank Dimster-clip_2127
Frank Dimster-clip_2127
Frank Dimster presents a series of multi-family house projects sited in California and the Bahamas. Dimster discusses his...
Frank Dimster-clip_2129
Frank Dimster-clip_2129