Videos | Yearly Archives: 1980 (16)

Augusto Alvarez Part Three
The video documents a screening of black and white 16mm film (no sound) which features the Bancomer Headquarters, completed in...
Charles Jencks Postmodern Classicism And The New Synthesis
Roland Coate introduces Charles Jencks, who discusses postmodern classicism as it evolved from modernism by pointing out selected...
Five Mexican Architects
Shelly Kappe interviews five architects from Mexico; Enrique Del Moral, Agust?n Hern?ndez, Abraham Zabludovsky and Teodoro...
Mexico Interviews And Charles Eames
A series of Mexican architects are interviewed individually by Shelly Kappe and discuss the development of modern architecture in...
Fred Koetter
Fred Koetter reflects on the idea of convention versus invention and how he aims to create interesting architectural responses by...
James Wines Part Two
James Wines continues his lecture, discussing a project for Venice and Best Products showrooms for South San Francisco; Hialeah,...
James Wines Part One
After reciting over-the-top negative comments on SITE, Inc.'s work James Wines offers a defense and explanation of his firm based...
Robert A M Stern Part One
Robert A. M. Stern begins by outlining his view of modern architecture, stressing the interaction of three elements: classical...

Charles Jencks Postmodern Classicism And The New Synthesis

November 5, 1980 | Video Lecturer:
Introduction by:

Roland Coate introduces Charles Jencks, who discusses postmodern classicism as it evolved from modernism by pointing out selected projects and typical features that exemplify the new movement. Jencks gives numerous examples that explain the polemics this movement tries to investigate in the wake of failed modernist dogma. He maintains the new style represents all the features of modernity without the machine aesthetic of modernism, and, in some respect, invigorates old theories with new formal ideas regarding symbolism and semantics, and, place and association.

Clips

Charles Jencks Postmodernism And The New...
Charles Jencks Postmodernism And The New Synthesis-clip_1119
Charles Jencks Postmodernism And The New...
Charles Jencks Postmodernism And The New Synthesis-clip_1120
Charles Jencks Postmodernism And The New...
Charles Jencks Postmodernism And The New Synthesis-clip_1121
Charles Jencks discusses postmodern classicism by comparing the semantic qualities of the movement with the classical Greek...
Charles Jencks Postmodernism And The New...
Charles Jencks Postmodernism And The New Synthesis-clip_1122

Five Mexican Architects

Shelly Kappe interviews five architects from Mexico; Enrique Del Moral, Agust?n Hern?ndez, Abraham Zabludovsky and Teodoro Gonz?lez de Le?n, and Augusto Alvarez. Additionally, she interviews Teodoro Gonz?lez de Le?n separately. The discussion with each architect is about the influence of their schooling at the National Autonomous University of Mexico. Each architect acknowledges the influence of Le Corbusier. In
De Le?n’s interview he details his work with Le Corbusier.

 


Mexico Interviews And Charles Eames

A series of Mexican architects are interviewed individually by Shelly Kappe and discuss the development of modern architecture in Mexico. Enrique Del Moral talks about his early days as a student of Jos? Villagr?n, and how winning the lottery enabled him to travel. Abraham Zabludovsky and Teodoro Gonz?lez de Le?n talk about their partnership which is more like a history of collaboration than a traditional office. Charles Eames speaks at LACMA in 1976 about various topics important to his practice, beginning with education and ways of learning. A 1973 WNET documentary “An Eames Celebration features an interview with Charles and Ray and focuses on their house for the Case Study House program five years after its completion.

Clips

Mexico Interviews And Charles Eames-clip_6242
Mexico Interviews And Charles Eames-clip_6242
Enrique Del Moral talks in October 1980 about his early days as a student of Jos? Villagr?n, and how winning the lottery enabled...
Mexico Interviews And Charles Eames-clip_5098
Mexico Interviews And Charles Eames-clip_5098

Fred Koetter

March 26, 1980 | Video Lecturer:

Fred Koetter reflects on the idea of convention versus invention and how he aims to create interesting architectural responses by referencing and reinterpreting the fundamental elements of architecture. Koether first discusses historic and classical uses of convention. Next he presents his own residential, high-rise and urban projects in which he reinterprets conventions.

Clips

Fred Koetter-clip_2980
Fred Koetter-clip_2980
Themes: ,
Fred Koetter addresses the topics of convention and invention in architecture. He discusses how the removal of architecture from...
Fred Koetter-clip_2981
Fred Koetter-clip_2981
Fred Koetter presents historic and classical architectural expressions, such as windows, stairs and walls, and their...
Fred Koetter-clip_2983
Fred Koetter-clip_2983

James Wines Part Two

James Wines continues his lecture, discussing a project for Venice and Best Products showrooms for South San Francisco; Hialeah, Florida; Richmond, Virginia; and Cutler Ridge, Florida. In response to audience comments, Wines expands on SITE’s Best Products patrons, Sydney and Frances Lewis, the extent to which SITE’s work is commentary, and communicating with the public.

Clips

James Wines Part Two-clip_9929
James Wines Part Two-clip_9929
James Wines continues his lecture with discussions of projects including the Molino Stucky renovation for the 1975 Venice...
James Wines Part Two-clip_9930
James Wines Part Two-clip_9930
James Wines responds to audience comments, discussing SITE's Best Products patrons, Sydney and Frances Lewis, the extent to which...

James Wines Part One

After reciting over-the-top negative comments on SITE, Inc.’s work James Wines offers a defense and explanation of his firm based on a personal reading of architectural history. He identifies the Renaissance as the moment when iconography detached itself from buildings, culminating in the modernist ideal of the building as abstract form. Wines discusses structuralism, rationalism, and postmodernism as valid but incomplete critiques of modernism and formalism. Wines characterizes SITE, Inc.’s work as inherited typologies invested with new meanings. He discusses several showrooms for Best Products, including Houston (1975), Sacramento (1977), Towson, Maryland (1978), an unbuilt project for Los Angeles (1976) and Ashland, Virginia (1979). Wines also discusses projects for other clients, including the Ghost Parking Lot (1978) and the facade for Camera Barn (1978). PLEASE NOTE: The image periodically goes all white in this video, though not for long. The audio is clear throughout.

 

Clips

James Wines Part One-clip_9931
James Wines Part One-clip_9931
An unknown woman introduces James Wines, principal of SITE, Inc., also inviting everyone to the upcoming Venturi &...
James Wines Part One-clip_9932
James Wines Part One-clip_9932
James Wines begins by reciting over-the-top negative comments on SITE, Inc.'s work that have appeared in print. He proposes to...
James Wines Part One-clip_9933
James Wines Part One-clip_9933
James Wines identifies the Renaissance as the moment when iconography and sculpture detached themselves from buildings,...
James Wines Part One-clip_9934
James Wines Part One-clip_9934
James Wines discusses current critiques of modernist architecture: structuralism (Peter Eisenman); rationalism (Aldo Rossi); and...
James Wines Part One-clip_9935
James Wines Part One-clip_9935
James Wines characterizes the work of SITE, Inc. as employing inherited typologies that they invest with new meanings. He...

Robert A M Stern Part One

Robert A. M. Stern begins by outlining his view of modern architecture, stressing the interaction of three elements: classical forms, vernacular styles, and technology. He characterizes Philip Johnson’s AT&T building is a sign of present-day freedom from modernist prescriptions. He dismisses present-day approaches to the vernacular as either overly nostalgic or overly indulgent. Stern discusses his work, starting with a 1975 townhouse in New York City, and including the Lang House (1974), houses in Westchester County and Long Island (both 1976), and some unbuilt projects, including a residential complex in East Hampton (1979), the Subway Suburb plan (1980), and prototype houses for a developer (1980).

Clips

Robert A M Stern Part One-clip_9923
Robert A M Stern Part One-clip_9923
An unidentified introducer describes Robert A. M. Stern as a "cosmological orchestrator of postmodernism."
Robert A M Stern Part One-clip_9924
Robert A M Stern Part One-clip_9924
Robert A. M. Stern begins by outlining his view of modern architecture--which he distinguishes from the architecture of...
Robert A M Stern Part One-clip_9925
Robert A M Stern Part One-clip_9925
Robert A. M. Stern discusses his work, starting with a 1975 townhouse in New York City, and including the Lang House (1974),...