Video Archive | Eric Owen Moss (62)

Enrique Norten
Eric Owen Moss introduces Enrique Norten. Moss suggests that there are four personalities to Enrique Norten while referencing...
Wes Jones The Machine Rules
Eric Owen Moss introduces Wes Jones as the speaker. Wes Jones presents projects produced by his office in the context of the...
Neil Denari
After an introduction by Eric Owen Moss, Neil Denari describes individuals who have been influential to his work. He goes on to...
David Sarkissyan
David Sarkissyan describes the establishment of the Shchusev State Museum of Architecture in Moscow. He discusses his role as...
Make It New Downtown Symposium
Eric Owen Moss introduces panelists Tom Gilmore, Con Howe, Jonathan Kelves, Jan Perry, and Dan Rosenfeld as people who will shape...
Eric Owen Moss Through The Glass Darkly
Eric Owen Moss begins his lecture by declaring that architecture is simultaneously and dialectically poetry and content. He...
Eric Owen Moss Recollecting Forward
Michael Pinto performs an extended Eric Owen Moss impersonation, which is received with laughter and applause. Michael Rotondi...
Wolf Prix The Dissipation Of Building In The Anticipation...
The video begins with a few seconds of Laurie Anderson's "Let X = X." Michael Rotondi encourages the audience to see the student...

Enrique Norten

March 29, 2004 | Video Lecturer: ,
Introduction by:

Eric Owen Moss introduces Enrique Norten. Moss suggests that there are four personalities to Enrique Norten while referencing Cuauht?moc, Mexican painters David Alfaro Siqueiros and Frida Kahlo, and Mexican architect Luis Barrag?n. Norten discusses the contemporary cultural complexity within Mexico City. He reflects on contradictions between the vocabulary of a universal architectural discourse while also understanding and recognizing the specific particularities of his work. He emphasizes his strong belief in tectonics and architecture’s existence at the moment of construction and shows a combination of smaller and larger scale projects.


Wes Jones The Machine Rules

January 29, 2003 | Video Lecturer:
Introduction by:

Eric Owen Moss introduces Wes Jones as the speaker. Wes Jones presents projects produced by his office in the context of the mechanistic nature of architecture. He addresses issues of flexibility, mobility, use of technology and modular systems in his work by drawing parallels to fundamental mechanical functions.

Clips

Wes Jones The Machine Rules-clip_2167
Wes Jones The Machine Rules-clip_2167
Wes Jones The Machine Rules-clip_2154
Wes Jones The Machine Rules-clip_2154
Themes:
Wes Jones discusses the title of his lecture "The Machine Rules" in what he describes as a ‘half critique of some current...
Wes Jones The Machine Rules-clip_2155
Wes Jones The Machine Rules-clip_2155
Wes Jones presents the project for a tower building in San Francisco and a house project in Brisbane. Jones reflects on the idea...
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Wes Jones The Machine Rules-clip_2159
Wes Jones describes the project PRO-CON (Program Container) which is based on creating a suburban infrastructure that uses...
Wes Jones The Machine Rules-clip_2165
Wes Jones The Machine Rules-clip_2165

Neil Denari

November 11, 2002 | Video Lecturer:
Introduction by:

After an introduction by Eric Owen Moss, Neil Denari describes individuals who have been influential to his work. He goes on to elaborate on projects from 1996 to 2003. He hopes to deliver a series of possibilities that become persuasive through his design work. He argues that form and desire are more powerful when they annex the logics of project requirements.

Clips

Neil Denari-clip_1845
Neil Denari-clip_1845
Eric Owen Moss introduces Neil Denari, commenting on the widespread interest in Denari's architectural discourse as well as his...
Neil Denari-clip_1847
Neil Denari-clip_1847
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Neil Denari-clip_1855
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Neil Denari-clip_1864
Neil Denari-clip_1866
Neil Denari-clip_1866
Themes:
Neil Denari follows his presentation with a brief question and answer session, re-stating his opinion that a lecture should...

David Sarkissyan

David Sarkissyan describes the establishment of the Shchusev State Museum of Architecture in Moscow. He discusses his role as director of the museum, as well as current projects he is pursuing. He discusses plans for the restoration of the museum building, the former Talyzin city estate. He reviews the history of architecture in Russia, surveying typical Russian building typologies, including constructivist housing. He distinguishes architecture from the Soviet and pre-Soviet periods. Sarkissyan discusses effect of the revolution on the building in Soviet Russia, reviewing the most influential figures. He discusses the evolution of constructvism and its influence on contemporary architecture. Sarkissyan discusses a 2001 international architectural competition, Russia’s first since the Soviet era, for a new Mariinsky Theater. He discusses in detail the entry by Eric Owen Moss. He concludes with the hope of continued dialogue between Los Angeles and Moscow.

Clips

David Sarkissyan-clip_5679
David Sarkissyan-clip_5679
David Sarkissyan-clip_5678
David Sarkissyan-clip_5678
Themes:
Sarkissyan reviews the history of architecture in Russia, surveying typical Russian building typologies, including constructivist...
David Sarkissyan-clip_5676
David Sarkissyan-clip_5676
David Sarkissyan-clip_5680
David Sarkissyan-clip_5680
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David Sarkissyan-clip_5681

Make It New Downtown Symposium

Eric Owen Moss introduces panelists Tom Gilmore, Con Howe, Jonathan Kelves, Jan Perry, and Dan Rosenfeld as people who will shape the future of Los Angeles. The group begins talking about the idea of memory and the effect the 9/11 Terrorist Attacks will have on the future direction of architecture, and what might happen at the Lower Manhattan site. The panelists discuss Los Angeles and the culture that defines the city. Moss describes SCI-Arc’s decision to move downtown, as an opportunity to get more deeply involved in the community. The panelists contrast “revitalization” as it is understood by architects and as it is understood by communities. The group talks about the availability of open, “fill-in” space in downtown Los Angeles, and the importance of a reliable public transit system. e panelists debate Los Angeles’s lack of center. They speculate about the effect of well established mass transportation and the boundaries of downtown Los Angeles. They conclude with a discussion of the experimental work of SCI-Arc students, stressing the importance in continuing a passionate pursuit of the art.

Clips

Make It New Downtown Symposium-clip_4961
Make It New Downtown Symposium-clip_4961
Eric Owen Moss introduces panelists Tom Gilmore, Con Howe, Jan Perry, and Dan Rosenfeld as people who will shape the future of...
Make It New Downtown Symposium-clip_4962
Make It New Downtown Symposium-clip_4962
Make It New Downtown Symposium-clip_4963
Make It New Downtown Symposium-clip_4963
Make It New Downtown Symposium-clip_4964
Make It New Downtown Symposium-clip_4964
The panelists debate Los Angeles's lack of center. They speculate about the effect of well established mass transportation and...
Make It New Downtown Symposium-clip_4965
Make It New Downtown Symposium-clip_4965

Eric Owen Moss Through The Glass Darkly

April 4, 2000 | Video Lecturer:
Introduction by:

Eric Owen Moss begins his lecture by declaring that architecture is simultaneously and dialectically poetry and content. He compares city planning to soccer as a system with an underlying order and method, but with an appearance of freedom from order. Moss reflects on the idea that buildings are about almost nothing or almost everything. He discusses his work in Culver City, referencing a Taoist shrine in Kyoto, the configuration of centripetal and centrifugal forces, a Hindu dancing Shiva, and a musical score by John Cage.

Clips

Eric Owen Moss Through The Glass Darkly-clip_6731
Eric Owen Moss Through The Glass Darkly-clip_6731

Eric Owen Moss Recollecting Forward

November 12, 1997 | Video Lecturer:
Introduction by:

Michael Pinto performs an extended Eric Owen Moss impersonation, which is received with laughter and applause. Michael Rotondi introduces Moss more conventionally. Moss reviews his work and discusses programming, context, typology, and construction. He talks about his belief in coherent, temporal moments of architectural associations. Moss explains his views on urban planning, figuration, and capturing time.

Clips

Eric Owen Moss Recollecting Forward-clip_3216
Eric Owen Moss Recollecting Forward-clip_3216
Eric Owen Moss Recollecting Forward-clip_3218
Eric Owen Moss Recollecting Forward-clip_3218
Eric Owen Moss Recollecting Forward-clip_3220
Eric Owen Moss Recollecting Forward-clip_3220

Wolf Prix The Dissipation Of Building In The Anticipation Of Architecture

February 15, 1995 | Video Lecturer:
Introduction by:

The video begins with a few seconds of Laurie Anderson’s “Let X = X.” Michael Rotondi encourages the audience to see the student work on display throughout the school for the NAAB and WASC accreditation teams visit. Eric Owen Moss introduces Wolf Prix as a pyromaniac, not an architect. Wolf Prix presents his sets for a Salzburg Festival production of Jean Cocteau and Igor Stravinsky’s “Oedipus Rex.” A video of the production plays throughout most of Prix’s lecture. Prix describes starting out in architecture in the 1960s, dreaming of a city that reacts to the citizens’s motions and emotions. And forms without material, unstable as clouds or flames. He developed a method of basing everything on sketches which were deliberately not architectural, and “excluded constraints.” Prix illustrates his sketch-based methodology in the rooftop office in Vienna, the Groninger Museum, competitions designs for Helsinki and Tours, a studio for Anselm Kiefer in France, the “Expressionist Utopia” exhibition at LACMA, and a Graz production of Bruno Taut’s opera “Der Weltbaumeister.” Prix continues the discussion of his sketching-based methodology by returning to the Groninger Museum. He explains the design’s evolution from sketch to model, and to construction.