Video Archive | Jeffrey Kipnis (18)

Jeffrey Kipnis & Andrew Zago
Jeffrey Kipnis begins the first of a series of conversations titled The Fecundity of a Mossy Climate with Andrew Zago....
Jeffrey Kipnis & Eric Owen Moss Look You Got It All...
Jeffrey Kipnis describes this seminar as a debate on the issues Eric Owen Moss's SCI-Arc directorship stressed, especially as...
Jeffrey Kipnis Who Is Moss?
Jeffrey Kipnis begins his discussion of Eric Owen Moss's work by questioning the notion of the self, its history and our...
Sanford Kwinter This Is Your Brain On Design
Kwinter proposes viewing the brain as an ecological problem, to be approached in terms of social science, evolution, and...
Jeff Kipnis Thesis Prep Talk Part Two
Jeffrey Kipnis discusses the role of the architecture school and how it influences how students interact with the environment. He...
Jeffrey Kipnis Thesis Prep Talk Part One
In part one of this two part lecture, Jeffrey Kipnis talks about an array of topics before focusing on the pedagogy of SCI-Arc....
Symposium What Is The Question
Eric Owen Moss moderates a symposium consisting of distinquished faculty members Jeffrey Kipnis, Michael Rotondi, and Hernan...
Eric Moss And Jeffrey Kipnis If Not Now When Installation
Jeffrey Kipnis articulates a response to Eric Owen Moss's installation in the SCI-Arc gallery, stressing the effect of shock and...

Jeffrey Kipnis & Andrew Zago

October 1, 2014 | Video Lecturer:

Jeffrey Kipnis begins the first of a series of conversations titled The Fecundity of a Mossy Climate with Andrew Zago. Kipnis presents an outline of Zago’s work, including the Cipher installation for the SCI-Arc Gallery, the Elevation studies, the Boing! chair, and the Rialto housing development project, proposing stages of being influenced and influencing others. Kipnis and Andrew Zago discuss pedagogy, drawing, technology, Boolean operations, and influences in general. Kipnis remarks that Zago’s characterizations of his own work demonstrate, “why your work has nothing to do with all the work that looks like it.”

Clips

Jeffrey Kipnis & Andrew Zago-clip_9528
Jeffrey Kipnis & Andrew Zago-clip_9528
Jeffrey Kipnis welcomes the audience to the first of a series of conversations titled The Fecundity of a Mossy Climate,...
Jeffrey Kipnis & Andrew Zago-clip_9529
Jeffrey Kipnis & Andrew Zago-clip_9529
Jeffrey Kipnis reviews some projects by Andrew Zago, including the Cipher installation, the Misregistration (Box Problem), the...
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Jeffrey Kipnis & Andrew Zago-clip_9530
Jeffrey Kipnis and Andrew Zago discuss pedagogy, non-visual techniques of drawing, technology, Boolean operations, and influences...
Jeffrey Kipnis & Andrew Zago-clip_9531
Jeffrey Kipnis & Andrew Zago-clip_9531

Jeffrey Kipnis & Eric Owen Moss Look You Got It All Wrong 1

Jeffrey Kipnis describes this seminar as a debate on the issues Eric Owen Moss’s SCI-Arc directorship stressed, especially as they relate to the students’ imminent engagement with practice. For the first session, the topic is the pleasure of building. Eric Owen Moss responds to the topic by describing his Penelope theory of architecture, in which building and making are necessarily accompanied by unmaking and doubt. He reviews important influences, and then discusses in detail the Trivida office, and the Waffle building, stressing the relationship between design and realization. Kipnis and Moss discuss the importance of designers anticipating what will be technological feasible, stressing the element of wonder or surprise as a core value.

 

 

Clips

Jeffrey Kipnis & Eric Owen Moss Look You Got It All...
Jeffrey Kipnis & Eric Owen Moss Look You Got It All Wrong 1-clip_9520
Themes: ,
Jeffrey Kipnis describes the seminar, Look! You've got it all wrong! as an attempt to reflect on the issues Eric Owen...
Jeffrey Kipnis & Eric Owen Moss Look You Got It All...
Jeffrey Kipnis & Eric Owen Moss Look You Got It All Wrong 1-clip_9521
Jeffrey Kipnis & Eric Owen Moss Look You Got It All...
Jeffrey Kipnis & Eric Owen Moss Look You Got It All Wrong 1-clip_9522
Jeffrey Kipnis & Eric Owen Moss Look You Got It All...
Jeffrey Kipnis & Eric Owen Moss Look You Got It All Wrong 1-clip_9523
Jeffrey Kipnis and Eric Owen Moss discuss the importance of designers anticipating what will be technological feasible, stressing...

Jeffrey Kipnis Who Is Moss?

Jeffrey Kipnis begins his discussion of Eric Owen Moss’s work by questioning the notion of the self, its history and our contemporary ideas of the self formed primarily during the nineteenth century. Kipnis compares the California School of architects and the East Coast’s New York Five in terms of rhetorical figures and part-to-whole relationships. He dismisses the idea of a pleasure in violence within Eric Owen Moss’ work, choosing to relate his work more to artist Bruce Nauman and the Greek concept of agon.


Sanford Kwinter This Is Your Brain On Design

April 5, 2011 | Video Lecturer: ,
Introduction by:

Kwinter proposes viewing the brain as an ecological problem, to be approached in terms of social science, evolution, and especially the concepts of type, gradient, and cycle. He argues that population thinking suggests that uniqueness such as zebra patterns and fingerprints are illustrations of ubiquitous environmental processes. Environments are robust but unstable, and once they are disturbed, they cannot be restored to a prior state. Kwinter proposes the science of drawing as an influence on modern notions of ecology. He uses the example of watering holes in Africa to argue that animals have the ability to communicate non-verbally to the entire population of a specific environment. The balance and distribution of stress and tensions can be read as form and order. Kwinter describes how organisms evolve the ability to track habits in order to “read” their environment. At the same time, environments reorganize and hide the intentions of the tracker. He argues that species evolve according to their immediate environment, developing abilities and sensitivities that, elsewhere, would hinder their ability to survive. He shifts his focus from the evolution of organisms to the evolution of specific organs, such as the thumb and the tooth. He describes how dietary and predatory challenges influenced their form and strength, hence significantly influencing human evolution. Kwinter begins describing how the human brain was able to evolve out of environmental influences. He describes human evolution as a series of environmental changes to which the brain was able to adapt. He concludes with images of some aboriginal peoples of the Omo Valley in Southern Ethiopia, commenting how seamlessly their social practices extend into the surrounding environment. Kwinter, joined later by Jeffrey Kipnis, responds to questions about the applicability of evolutionary theory to architecture, and also genes, teeth, air conditioning, and postmodernism.

Clips

Sanford Kwinter This Is Your Brain On Design-clip_4831
Sanford Kwinter This Is Your Brain On Design-clip_4831
Sanford Kwinter This Is Your Brain On Design-clip_4826
Sanford Kwinter This Is Your Brain On Design-clip_4826
Kwinter argues that population thinking suggests that uniqueness such as zebra patterns and fingerprints are illustrations of...
Sanford Kwinter This Is Your Brain On Design-clip_4827
Sanford Kwinter This Is Your Brain On Design-clip_4827
Sanford Kwinter This Is Your Brain On Design-clip_4828
Sanford Kwinter This Is Your Brain On Design-clip_4828
Sanford Kwinter describes how organisms evolve the ability to track habits in order to "read" their environment. At the same...
Sanford Kwinter This Is Your Brain On Design-clip_4829
Sanford Kwinter This Is Your Brain On Design-clip_4829
Themes: , , ,
Sanford Kwinter shifts his focus from the evolution of organisms to the evolution of specific organs, such as the thumb and the...

Jeff Kipnis Thesis Prep Talk Part Two

January 20, 2011 | Video Lecturer:

Jeffrey Kipnis discusses the role of the architecture school and how it influences how students interact with the environment. He questions the audience about issues of intelligence, specialization, and representation. Citing Le Corbusier’s Five Points of Architecture and the Villa Savoye, Kipnis argues that meaning changes over time. He stresses the importance of evolving through learning and peer interaction.

Clips

Jeff Kipnis Thesis Prep Talk Part Two-clip_3636
Jeff Kipnis Thesis Prep Talk Part Two-clip_3636
Jeff Kipnis Thesis Prep Talk Part Two-clip_3637
Jeff Kipnis Thesis Prep Talk Part Two-clip_3637
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Jeff Kipnis Thesis Prep Talk Part Two-clip_3638

Jeffrey Kipnis Thesis Prep Talk Part One

January 20, 2011 | Video Lecturer:
Introduction by:

In part one of this two part lecture, Jeffrey Kipnis talks about an array of topics before focusing on the pedagogy of SCI-Arc. Throughout, Kipnis describes the ethos of the school, as well as, the intents and desires of the individuals have on the process. Though he strays several times during, he is able to continually draw back to how it relates to discovering and learning about architecture.

Clips

Jeffrey Kipnis Thesis Prep Talk Part One-clip_3633
Jeffrey Kipnis Thesis Prep Talk Part One-clip_3633
Jeffrey Kipnis talks about the changing sentiments of the practice of architecture, claiming that each movement tends to last...
Jeffrey Kipnis Thesis Prep Talk Part One-clip_3634
Jeffrey Kipnis Thesis Prep Talk Part One-clip_3634
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Jeffrey Kipnis Thesis Prep Talk Part One-clip_3635
Continuing his talk to graduate students, Jeffrey Kipnis describes acting techniques and how contemporary exercises create the...

Symposium What Is The Question

Eric Owen Moss moderates a symposium consisting of distinquished faculty members Jeffrey Kipnis, Michael Rotondi, and Hernan Diaz-Alonzo. They discuss representation, imagery, functionality, materials, and contemporary culture. Coy Howard, Elena Manferdini, and Chris Genik pose questions for the panelists. They reflect on the recent death of Raimund Abraham.

Clips

Symposium What Is The Question-clip_3864
Symposium What Is The Question-clip_3864
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Symposium What Is The Question-clip_3865
Michael Rotondi discusses the impact of terrorism on architecture and how, for example, embassies reflect contemporary values and...
Symposium What Is The Question-clip_3867
Symposium What Is The Question-clip_3867
Symposium What Is The Question-clip_3869
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Symposium What Is The Question-clip_3871
Symposium What Is The Question-clip_3871
The panelists discuss fashion and its historical relevance to architecture. They compare and contrast the two arts discussing...