Video Archive | Keller Easterling (2)

Keller Easterling Believers and Cheaters
Keller Easterling presents a survey of "spatial products" described by political actors she identifies as "believers" and...
Keller Easterling Network Sites
After 15 seconds of music, the video presents Margaret Crawford introducing Keller Easterling, who notes that besides her...

Keller Easterling Believers and Cheaters

November 17, 2004 | Video Lecturer:
Introduction by:

Keller Easterling presents a survey of “spatial products” described by political actors she identifies as “believers” and “cheaters.” Drawing from the political maneuvering of world leaders, Easterling creates a profile of three typologies of “sites.” These sites include global trade hubs, high-tech agricultural developments, and tourist destinations in North Korea.

Clips

Keller Easterling Believers and Cheaters-clip_1875
Keller Easterling Believers and Cheaters-clip_1875
Marcelo Spina introduces Keller Easterling, describing and her role in the emergence of digital design at Columbia University. He...
Keller Easterling Believers and Cheaters-clip_1876
Keller Easterling Believers and Cheaters-clip_1876
Themes:
Easterling explains the topic of her lecture, "Believers and Cheaters." She identifies a series of political figures, and reviews...
Keller Easterling Believers and Cheaters-clip_1877
Keller Easterling Believers and Cheaters-clip_1877
Keller Easterling Believers and Cheaters-clip_1879
Keller Easterling Believers and Cheaters-clip_1879

Keller Easterling Network Sites

February 22, 1995 | Video Lecturer:
Introduction by:

After 15 seconds of music, the video presents Margaret Crawford introducing Keller Easterling, who notes that besides her influential theoretical scholarship, publishing and teaching, she has also worked as an architect, and writen and produced several plays. Easterling begins with a general discussion of the processes and relationships evoked by her theme of networks. She talks about spatial economies based on addition or adjustment, often based on biological or neurophysiological models. Easterling discusses another network process: subtraction. She discusses the U.S. highways system as an “economy of erasure.” Easterling discusses interrelated residential, geotechnical and hydraullic networks. Easterling discusses electronic networks, noting that they will probably render some aspects of architecture obsolete, while giving other aspects new significance.