Video Archive | Raphael Soriano (4)

Design Forum And Ray Kappe Part One
This video begins with partial footage of an unrelated panel discussion hosted by Shelly Kappe with guests Thornton Abell,...
Raphael Soriano Part One
Raphael Soriano discusses architecture, art, culture and science and emphasizes a need to steer clear of nonsense and...
Raphael Soriano Part Two
Raphael Soriano cheerfully dismisses as irrational whimsy the buildings of Frank Lloyd Wright, Louis Sullivan, Paolo Soleri, Eric...
Raphael Soriano Part Three
Raphael Soriano discusses his ideas and opinions about architecture. Referring to music, he contrasts Bach's "natural"...

Design Forum And Ray Kappe Part One

This video begins with partial footage of an unrelated panel discussion hosted by Shelly Kappe with guests Thornton Abell, Harwell Hamilton Harris, Gregory Ain, and Raphael Soriano. Ray Kappe gives a lecture on his personal practice and how it was started. He also discusses the formation of his collaborative work as a partnership with Herb Kahn and Rex Lotery. He talks about his interest in urban issues as well as social and land issues. Kappe shows examples of his work and gives an account for some of his design choices. He discusses materials such as wood and steel and the advantages and disadvantages of both. He also deals with structures, mechanical systems, and perceptions within a system.

Clips

Design Forum And Ray Kappe Part One-clip_6061
Design Forum And Ray Kappe Part One-clip_6061
Ray Kappe discusses his personal practice and how it was started. He also discusses the formation of his collaborative work as a...
Design Forum And Ray Kappe Part One-clip_6063
Design Forum And Ray Kappe Part One-clip_6063
Design Forum And Ray Kappe Part One-clip_6065
Design Forum And Ray Kappe Part One-clip_6065
This subclip contains partial footage of an unrelated panel discussion hosted by Shelly Kappe with guests Thornton Abell, Harwell...

Raphael Soriano Part One

January 1, 1977 | Video Lecturer:
Introduction by:

Raphael Soriano discusses architecture, art, culture and science and emphasizes a need to steer clear of nonsense and entertainment. He discusses the purity of children, and how their inborn understanding is marred by the brainwashing of education. He plays a series of audio clips to demonstrate the declining quality of media and the problematic attempts to connect all of the arts. He suggests that the arts should be allowed to exist separately and their meanings distinguished and understood independently. Soriano concludes with a presentation of slides and discusses the issues he sees in defining rules of proportion and scale.

Clips

Raphael Soriano Part One-clip_5083
Raphael Soriano Part One-clip_5083
Shelly Kappe introduces Raphael Soriano, reviewing his life story, and his rejection of his classical training and his embrace of...
Raphael Soriano Part One-clip_5084
Raphael Soriano Part One-clip_5084
Raphael Soriano Part One-clip_5085
Raphael Soriano Part One-clip_5085

Raphael Soriano Part Two

January 1, 1977 | Video Lecturer:

Raphael Soriano cheerfully dismisses as irrational whimsy the buildings of Frank Lloyd Wright, Louis Sullivan, Paolo Soleri, Eric Mendelsohn, Skidmore, Owings and Merrill, and others. He contrasts their “gimicks” and complexity with the simplicity, order and regularity of natural structures. Soriano characterizes the irrationality of urban design intellectuals, patterned toilet paper, and embroidered clothes as analogous to diseased and healthy tomatoes and flowers from his garden. Soriano rapidly surveys his own buildings, from the first houses and shops. He stresses his extensive work in prefabriation, and modular construction. He argues that it’s necessary, at this historical moment, to choose between the culture of Albert Einstein, which has put men on the moon, and the culture of Salvador Dal?, which has accomplished nothing.


Raphael Soriano Part Three

January 1, 1977 | Video Lecturer:

Raphael Soriano discusses his ideas and opinions about architecture. Referring to music, he contrasts Bach’s “natural” compositional procedures with the “gimmicks” of John Cage. He says that he does not know what the definition of “spiritual man” is, and that people are bamboozled by merchants of publicity who keep us from being natural humans. Ornate architecture that goes beyond its structure is “dangerous” because when one works for society, one must act with great responsibility.