Video Archive | Werner Oechslin (1)

Werner Oechslin
Oechslin claims that architecture progresses from necessity, to usefulness, and finally to aesthetics. He comments on the story...

Werner Oechslin

April 15, 1987 | Video Lecturer:

Oechslin claims that architecture progresses from necessity, to usefulness, and finally to aesthetics. He comments on the story in Vitruvius about the Greek philosopher Aristippus, who, lost, discovered geometic forms drawn in the sand and exclaimed that he was among civilized people. He discusses geometry in Vitruvius, geometry as a communication device. Oechslin discusses architectural drawing, focusing on Vitruvius and Palladio. He distinguishes artistic from architectural drawings, and argues that Vitruvius equated “design” with “idea.” Oechslin characterizes Corbusier’s Five Points of a New Architecture as a modern attempt to connect geometry with aesthetics. Oechslin argues that Le Corbusier followed the Vitruvian tradition that considered the plan, elevation and section the driving force behind a design. He discusses the definition of figure through Euclidean geometry, and how that changes their meaning.

Clips

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