Video Archive | Abstraction (9)

Juan Azulay Matter Management Architecture Biomedia
Juan Azulay is the director of the Los Angeles-based firm MM Matter Management discusses his work in architecture, media arts,...
Juan Azulay Matter Management Architecture...
Juan Azulay is the director of the Los Angeles-based firm MM Matter Management discusses his work in architecture, media arts,...
Juan Azulay Matter Management Architecture...
Juan Azulay reads a statement accompanied by a scene from David Cronenberg's 1988 feature Dead Ringers.
Enrique Norten
Enrique Norten describes buildings that he has designed in or around Mexico City, including houses, auto dealerships, low-cost...
Enrique Norten-clip_4027
Norten presents a cultural center at Lindavista, which he characterizes as repetition due to structural rationalism. The...
Wes Jones-clip_931
Jones thinks that Le Corbusier took modernism in the wrong direction by choosing abstraction and mass production as the form of...
Michael Graves Figurative Architecture-clip_3204
Michael Graves begins by noting friends and former students in the audience, and remarks that visiting Morphosis makes him feel...
Michael Graves Figurative Architecture-clip_3206
Graves concludes the review of his own work by revisiting the Portland Building. As the frequent target of negative criticism,...

Juan Azulay Matter Management Architecture Biomedia

October 8, 2010 |
Introduction by:

Juan Azulay is the director of the Los Angeles-based firm MM Matter Management discusses his work in architecture, media arts, film and urbanism.

Clips

Juan Azulay Matter Management Architecture...
Juan Azulay Matter Management Architecture Biomedia-clip_4046
Juan Azulay is the director of the Los Angeles-based firm MM Matter Management discusses his work in architecture, media arts,...
Juan Azulay Matter Management Architecture...
Juan Azulay Matter Management Architecture Biomedia-clip_4047
Juan Azulay reads a statement accompanied by a scene from David Cronenberg's 1988 feature Dead Ringers.

Enrique Norten

February 23, 1994 | Video Lecturer:
Introduction by:

Enrique Norten describes buildings that he has designed in or around Mexico City, including houses, auto dealerships, low-cost housing, and cultural centers. Norten declares his belief in a modernism that is rooted in humanism and not dogma. He argues that a lot of 20th century cities are unencumbered by history or nostalgia and hence modernist by nature. Norten states that architecture cannot be experienced without movement, so it makes sense for the built objects to participate in the sense of movement and be dynamic.

Clips

Enrique Norten-clip_4024
Enrique Norten-clip_4024
Aaron Betsky introduces Enrique Norten, noting his education at the Universidad Iberoamericana, and Cornell. Norten practices...
Enrique Norten-clip_4025
Enrique Norten-clip_4025
Norten presents some early residential projects, House N and House O. With both these houses, Norten stresses the restrictive...
Enrique Norten-clip_4026
Enrique Norten-clip_4026
Enrique Norten-clip_4027
Enrique Norten-clip_4027
Enrique Norten-clip_4028
Enrique Norten-clip_4028
Norten declares his belief in a modernism that is rooted in humanism and not dogma. He argues that a lot of 20th century cities...

Enrique Norten-clip_4027

View the Full Video: Enrique Norten
February 23, 1994 | Video Lecturer:

Subclip

Norten presents a cultural center at Lindavista, which he characterizes as repetition due to structural rationalism. The Insurgentes theater involves the intersection of masses creating a variety of spatial conditions. The Televisa services building in Mexico City is an iconic urban building that centralizes a variety of functions in a unified space.


Wes Jones-clip_931

View the Full Video: Wes Jones
March 22, 1989 |

Subclip

Jones thinks that Le Corbusier took modernism in the wrong direction by choosing abstraction and mass production as the form of expression for architecture. He points out that architecture is still not mass-produced, and that abstraction has a tendency to alienate the individual. Jones also argues that technology has a formal language and logic which is a hybrid between nature and the human consciousness. He proposes technology can be mined for formal qualities, and be used to create more individualistic designs.


Michael Graves Figurative Architecture-clip_3204

Subclip

Michael Graves begins by noting friends and former students in the audience, and remarks that visiting Morphosis makes him feel like he is from another time. He characterizes the first part of his lecture as “Architecture 101.” He contrasts two sitting rooms: one from a nineteenth century Biedermeier painting by Georg Friedrich Kersting, the other from Le Corbusier’s Villa Savoye, and discusses the different ideas of habitation they convey. He describes being interviewed by Ada Louise Huxtable, in which he denied ever being a painter, and after which she wrote about his background as a painter. He discusses plan-making, which he identifies as one of the most abstract tasks of the architect. Graves revisits the Crystal Palace, while discussing it’s relevance to contemporary architecture.


Michael Graves Figurative Architecture-clip_3206

Subclip

Graves concludes the review of his own work by revisiting the Portland Building. As the frequent target of negative criticism, Graves argues that it’s important to maintain criticism as a forum for opinion, but not to misuse criticism to silence voices or sabotage work that might be
unpopular. He ends by warning students not to copy his mannerisms, but to engage in classicism creatively and thoughtfully. He particularly warns against the new classical revival movement, which he characterizes as “trite.”