Video Archive | Adolf Loos (7)

Bruno Queysanne Part One
Bruno Queysanne presents some of his research concerning the conflict between the philosopher Ludwig Wittgenstein and the...
Bruno Queysanne Part One-clip_5729
Bruno Queysanne presents some of his research concerning the conflict between the philosopher Ludwig Wittgenstein and the...
Bruno Queysanne Part One-clip_5732
Bruno Queysanne compares Wittgenstein's plan for his sister's house with the plan created earlier by the architect Paul Engleman....
Bruno Queysanne Part One-clip_5733
Turning to the work of Adolf Loos, Bruno Queysanne notes that his first projects were restorations, not freestanding...
Bruno Queysanne Part One-clip_5736
Bruno Queysanne discusses some provocative details of the interior of Loos' Villa Muller: textile used as marble, furniture that...
Bruno Queysanne Part Two
The concluding nine minutes of Bruno Queysanne's lecture contrasting Ludwig Wittgenstein and...
Reyner Banham Myths Meanings And Forms Of Twentieth...
Reyner Banham discusses the myth of the economy of modern architecture, citing precedents that enforce his idea of "cheap"...

Bruno Queysanne Part One

February 9, 1996 | Video Lecturer:
Introduction by:

Bruno Queysanne presents some of his research concerning the conflict between the philosopher Ludwig Wittgenstein and the architect Adolf Loos. He discusses the view that anything added to a building that is not part of its structure diminishes it as a work of architecture. He argues that Wittgenstein’s house for his sister doesn’t reflect Wittgenstein’s work in philosophy. Queysanne characterizes the house’s lack of cladding outside, and the abundant cladding inside seems to suggest agreement with Loos’ and Gottfried Semper’s argument that cladding is the true origin of architecture instead of the structure. Queysanne compares Wittgenstein’s plan for his sister’s house with the plan created earlier by the architect Paul Engleman. Wittgenstein was so committed to avoiding any kind of ornamentation that he excluded necessary structural elements in order to maintain a pure form. Turning to Loos, Queysanne argues that Loos strove to charge a space with feeling so that the structure would recede to the background. The Villa Muller’s exterior is similar to the Wittgenstein house in its minimal exterior, but achieves meaning absent in the Wittgenstein house through the protective metal at the top the walls, a type of cornice. He discusses some provocative details of the interior of Loos’ Villa Muller: textile used as marble, furniture that is part of the structure, openings that connect spaces.

Clips

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View the Full Video: Bruno Queysanne Part One
February 9, 1996 | Video Lecturer:

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Turning to the work of Adolf Loos, Bruno Queysanne notes that his first projects were restorations, not freestanding constructions. Acccording to Queysanne, Loos strove to charge a space with feeling so that the structure would recede to the background. The Villa Muller’s exterior is similar to the Wittgenstein house in its minimal exterior, but achieves meaning absent in the Wittgenstein house through the protective metal at the top the walls, a type of cornice.


Reyner Banham Myths Meanings And Forms Of Twentieth Century Architecture-clip_583

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Reyner Banham discusses the myth of the economy of modern architecture, citing precedents that enforce his idea of “cheap” buildings. He discusses Le Corbusier’s desire to mimic the ideas that spawn automobiles and cruise ships into developed, efficient, streamlined machines. Banham quotes Corbusier calling this development “the law of mechanical selection.”