Video Archive | Affordable housing (31)

Eric Bunge CTRL_A-clip_9539
Under the category of Architecture that adapts to change, Eric Bunge discusses projects including their Canopy for PS. 1...
Hubert Klumpner & Alfredo Brillembourg-clip_9504
Hubert Klumpner and Alfredo Brillembourg describe several of their projects, including the 2012 Venice Biennale, the Vertical Gym...
Luyanda Mpahlwa Reflections On Thirty Years In...
Luyanda Mpahlwa begins by describing how in 1978 he was part of the first group of Black students permitted to study architecture...
Luyanda Mpahlwa Reflections On Thirty Years In...
Luyanda Mpahlwa describes conditions in the townships, where the Black population struggles without services and facilities much...
Stephen Slaughter From Phat To Watts
Stephen Slaughter reviews his influences and his belief in abstraction, in outlining his goals. He stresses that success depends...
Stephen Slaughter From Phat To Watts-clip_4661
Stephen Slaughter reviews his influences and his belief in abstraction, in outlining his goals. He stresses that success depends...
Wes Jones The Machine Rules-clip_2167
Wes Jones presents a series of projects that use standard low cost building materials to create modular and flexible systems of...
Dana Cuff
Cuff remarks that her talk will focus on large residential developments in Southern California covered in her upcoming book, "The...

Hubert Klumpner & Alfredo Brillembourg-clip_9504

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September 17, 2014 |

Subclip

Hubert Klumpner and Alfredo Brillembourg describe several of their projects, including the 2012 Venice Biennale, the Vertical Gym kit-of-parts, the Grotao Community Center in Sao Paulo, the Metro Cable public transportation system in Caracas, and the Power Shack housing for Khayelitsha township, outside Capetown, South Africa. They conclude with “Informality’s the new normality.”


Luyanda Mpahlwa Reflections On Thirty Years In Architecture

October 10, 2011 |
Introduction by:

Luyanda Mpahlwa begins by describing how in 1978 he was part of the first group of Black students permitted to study architecture in South Africa. His education was interrupted by five years at Robben Island Maximum Security Prison, after which he completed his education at the Berlin Technical University. He notes how working in Berlin during the reconstruction period immediately following German reunification was a good preparation for post-apartheid South Africa after 1994. Mpahlwa describes his work as project architect for the Felleshus campus of five Nordic embassies in Berlin, and as designer of the new South African embassy in Berlin. He reviews his work in Cape Town since 1994, including an extension to Parliament, and the international airport, a luxury home, and participation in the committee overseeing the construction of ten new stadiums to accommodate South Africa hosting the 2010 World Cup. Mpahlwa describes conditions in the townships, where the Black population struggles without services and facilities much of the world takes for granted. He describes a number of his architectural interventions, including a school, a youth center, low-cost housing using sandbags in the Mitchells Plein area of Cape Town, the Nike Football Training Facility in Soweto, and his proposal for a Design District Incubator for the Fringe district of Cape Town–an area which had been an urban Black community until being cleared by apartheid. Mpahlwa responds to questions about the usefulness of the World Cup stadiums after the games, working in difficult environments with very limited resources, and the value of architects intervening creatively in townships.

Clips

Luyanda Mpahlwa Reflections On Thirty Years In...
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Eric Owen Moss introduces Luyanda Mpahlwa as a welcome voice from a part of the world that has been under-represented in...
Luyanda Mpahlwa Reflections On Thirty Years In...
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Luyanda Mpahlwa Reflections On Thirty Years In...
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Luyanda Mpahlwa Reflections On Thirty Years In...
Luyanda Mpahlwa Reflections On Thirty Years In Architecture-clip_7743

Luyanda Mpahlwa Reflections On Thirty Years In Architecture-clip_7743

Subclip

Luyanda Mpahlwa describes conditions in the townships, where the Black population struggles without services and facilities much of the world takes for granted. He describes a number of his architectural interventions, including a school, a youth center, low-cost housing using sandbags in the Mitchells Plein area of Cape Town, the Nike Football Training Facility in Soweto, and his proposal for a Design District Incubator for the Fringe district of Cape Town–an area which had been an urban Black community until being cleared by apartheid.


Stephen Slaughter From Phat To Watts

March 26, 2010 | Video Lecturer:
Introduction by:

Stephen Slaughter reviews his influences and his belief in abstraction, in outlining his goals. He stresses that success depends on teamwork, discussing how this relates to his entry for low-income housing competition. Slaughter discusses a studio he taught in which students created shelters at the Burning Man festival. He describes the renovation of a house that represents the culture of the occupants and the history of the site. He presents a video that offers an African-American history of Watts and its culture. Slaughter discusses his engagement in the community and activist aspirations. He talks about his passion for an expressive facade, showing the completed house renovation. The house incorporates the abstract representation of heritage Slaughter sought to achieve.

Clips

Stephen Slaughter From Phat To Watts-clip_4661
Stephen Slaughter From Phat To Watts-clip_4661
Stephen Slaughter reviews his influences and his belief in abstraction, in outlining his goals. He stresses that success depends...
Stephen Slaughter From Phat To Watts-clip_4663
Stephen Slaughter From Phat To Watts-clip_4663
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Stephen Slaughter discusses a studio he taught in which students created shelters at the Burning Man festival. He describes the...
Stephen Slaughter From Phat To Watts-clip_4665
Stephen Slaughter From Phat To Watts-clip_4665
Stephen Slaughter discusses his engagement in the community and activist aspirations. He talks about his passion for an...

Dana Cuff

February 14, 2002 | Video Lecturer:
Introduction by: ,

Cuff remarks that her talk will focus on large residential developments in Southern California covered in her upcoming book, “The Provisional City.” She comments on the role of public housing in shaping the urban and suburban landscape and the post-war American city. The federal government defined these trends through funding. She asks, “why did suburban development succeed and modern utopian visions fail, and why was the suburban home not a modern home?” Cuff argues that urban theory needs to focus on unstable and temporary conditions. In much of the development of the past, history is wiped out in discontinuous ways, leaving no trace of former spatial organizations. Cuff characterizes “community building” projects as utopian in their destruction of a past for an idealized notion of a future. Cuff discusses the removal of individuals from their homes through eminent domain, and relocating them in new residences. She cites the development of Elysian Park Heights in Los Angeles and the controversy surrounding public housing in an era of anti-communist sentiment. Cuff discusses the role of the Los Angeles Times in blocking public housing. She describes how the modernist design aspect of faded from urban visions and design ideals for the private housing sector.

Clips

Dana Cuff-clip_5379
Dana
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Dana Cuff-clip_5380
Cuff argues that urban theory needs to focus on unstable and temporary conditions. In much of the development of the past,...
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Dana Cuff-clip_5381