Video Archive | Africa (3)

Paolo Cascone Eco_Logic Design-clip_4076
Cascone discusses his research on African vernacular construction methods, and how they can inform a new architectural paradigm...
Ad?le Naud? Santos
Ad?le Naud? Santos reviews her early work in southern Africa, a decade of teaching in the U.S., and her return to practice. She...
Ad?le Naud? Santos-clip_4645
Ad?le Santos describes how before coming to the United States she practiced for four years in southern Africa, leaving...

Paolo Cascone Eco_Logic Design-clip_4076

View the Full Video: Paolo Cascone Eco_Logic Design
February 16, 2011 | Video Lecturer:

Subclip

Cascone discusses his research on African vernacular construction methods, and how they can inform a new architectural paradigm incorporating high-tech design with low-tech construction methods.


Ad?le Naud? Santos

Ad?le Naud? Santos reviews her early work in southern Africa, a decade of teaching in the U.S., and her return to practice. She presents a house with distinct public and private aspects, a proposal for an Arts Park in Los Angeles she collaborated in, and projects in Japan that use terraces to bring light and space to narrow, multistory buildings.

Clips

Ad?le Naud? Santos-clip_4644
Ad?le Naud? Santos-clip_4644
Ad?le Naud? Santos-clip_4645
Ad?le Naud? Santos-clip_4645
Ad?le Santos describes how before coming to the United States she practiced for four years in southern Africa, leaving...
Ad?le Naud? Santos-clip_4646
Ad?le Naud? Santos-clip_4646
Ad?le Santos presents a house project which she says has two faces: the very private side facing the street, and the garden...
Ad?le Naud? Santos-clip_4647
Ad?le Naud? Santos-clip_4647
Ad?le Naud? Santos-clip_4648
Ad?le Naud? Santos-clip_4648
Ad?le Santos discusses Kachofugetsu-kan, a project for a client in Japan who wanted a building for his offices, plus an art...

Ad?le Naud? Santos-clip_4645

View the Full Video: Ad?le Naud? Santos
November 1, 1989 | Video Lecturer:

Subclip

Ad?le Santos describes how before coming to the United States she practiced for four years in southern Africa, leaving temporarily–she assumed–to teach for a year. A decade later she got back into practice by entering a series of competitions. Thinking of architecture as a humanistic discipline, she believes that it should not be approached too abstractly. She struggles in her projects to make them contextually, culturally, and technologically appropriate.