Video Archive | Aldo Rossi (5)

Jorge Silvetti-clip_5488
Roger Sherman introduces Jorge Silvetti, noting that he was born in Buenos Aires and received his degree in architecture from the...
Kurt Forster-clip_3803
Andrew Zago introduces Kurt Forster, who begins by reviewing the current architectural scene. He considers architecture largely...
Kurt Forster-clip_3806
Kurt Forster compares Gehry with James Stirling, with whom he shares a deep interest in Russian Constructivism, and using form...
Charles Jencks Recent Italian And Japanese...
Charles Jencks describes developments in Italian architecture by citing several examples of items and projects that developed...
Reyner Banham Myths Meanings And Forms Of Twentieth...
Reyner Banham answers questions concerning the future of architecture and the International Style. He discusses influences of...

Jorge Silvetti-clip_5488

View the Full Video: Jorge Silvetti
March 12, 1997 | Video Lecturer:

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Roger Sherman introduces Jorge Silvetti, noting that he was born in Buenos Aires and received his degree in architecture from the University of Buenos Aires, and later completed a masters degree at UC Berkeley. Since 1975 he has taught architecture at Harvard’s Graduate School of Design, and was named the department chairman in 1995.


Kurt Forster-clip_3803

View the Full Video: Kurt Forster
February 25, 1987 | Video Lecturer:

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Andrew Zago introduces Kurt Forster, who begins by reviewing the current architectural scene. He considers architecture largely lost, consisting of either ruins of earlier explorations, or parasites which feed on their environment. Forster characterizes Frank O. Gehry’s work as simultaneously momentary and lasting. Forster analyzes Gehry’s construction methods, emphasizing his ingenuity and craftsmanship.


Charles Jencks Recent Italian And Japanese Architecture-clip_2172

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Charles Jencks describes developments in Italian architecture by citing several examples of items and projects that developed through the 1960s and 1970s. He uses Carlo Maciachini’s Milan Cemetery to show how a collection of styles in one place can form a type of architectural utopia. Jencks frames the enduring metaphors and signifiers of 1930s Fascism as the context for subsequent explorations of irony and obscenity, especially in projects by Superstudio, and rationalists like Aldo Rossi.


Reyner Banham Myths Meanings And Forms Of Twentieth Century Architecture-clip_687

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Reyner Banham answers questions concerning the future of architecture and the International Style. He discusses influences of neo-classicism on twentieth century architecture, concluding that symmetry is not synonymous is bad design. Banham then describes how he feels meaning gets attached to certain typologies and how those types blurred when moving from Europe to America, and back.