Video Archive | Aluminum (5)

Dwayne Oyler And Jenny Wu Live Wire
Dwayne Oyler and Jenny Wu discuss their installation "Live Wire" with Eric Owen Moss. Created in collaboration with the...
Dwayne Oyler And Jenny Wu Live Wire-clip_4334
Eric Owen Moss introduces Los Angeles-based architects and SCI-Arc Studio Design Faculty Members, Dwayne Oyler and Jenny Wu, and...
Dwayne Oyler And Jenny Wu Live Wire-clip_4335
Dwayne Oyler and Jenny Wu characterize "Live Wire" as an attempt to occupy the SCI-Arc Gallery in a way that exploits the spatial...
Dwayne Oyler And Jenny Wu Live Wire-clip_4337
Dwayne Oyler and Jenny Wu describe how "Live Wire" inserts a vertical circulation system, a stair, linking the floor level of the...
Jim Jennings
Jennings describes his Telegraph Hill house in San Francisco, which is centered around a cylindrical concrete circulation core....

Dwayne Oyler And Jenny Wu Live Wire

Dwayne Oyler and Jenny Wu discuss their installation “Live Wire” with Eric Owen Moss. Created in collaboration with the engineering firm Buro Happold, Oyler and Wu characterize “Live Wire” as an attempt to occupy the SCI-Arc Gallery in a way that exploits the spatial potential of the existing venue and strives to define an expanded relationship between tectonic expression and functional performance. The installation inserts a vertical circulation system, a stair, linking the floor level of the gallery to the catwalk above and is constructed of approximately 2,400 linear feet of aluminum tubing and rods. The stair, often relegated to pure functional use, is a testing ground for weaving together a multitude of architectural ideas, ranging from the manipulation of light, geometry, and structure to vertical circulation.

Clips

Dwayne Oyler And Jenny Wu Live Wire-clip_4334
Dwayne Oyler And Jenny Wu Live Wire-clip_4334
Eric Owen Moss introduces Los Angeles-based architects and SCI-Arc Studio Design Faculty Members, Dwayne Oyler and Jenny Wu, and...
Dwayne Oyler And Jenny Wu Live Wire-clip_4335
Dwayne Oyler And Jenny Wu Live Wire-clip_4335
Dwayne Oyler and Jenny Wu characterize "Live Wire" as an attempt to occupy the SCI-Arc Gallery in a way that exploits the spatial...
Dwayne Oyler And Jenny Wu Live Wire-clip_4337
Dwayne Oyler And Jenny Wu Live Wire-clip_4337
Dwayne Oyler and Jenny Wu describe how "Live Wire" inserts a vertical circulation system, a stair, linking the floor level of the...

Dwayne Oyler And Jenny Wu Live Wire-clip_4337

Subclip

Dwayne Oyler and Jenny Wu describe how “Live Wire” inserts a vertical circulation system, a stair, linking the floor level of the gallery to the catwalk above and is constructed of approximately 2,400 linear feet of aluminum tubing and rods. The stair, often relegated to pure functional use, is a testing ground for weaving together a multitude of architectural ideas, ranging from the manipulation of light, geometry, and structure to vertical circulation. “Live Wire” is aimed at suggesting an expanded definition of architectural elements, one that surpasses boundaries of simple functions and suggests intangible results.


Jim Jennings

View the Full Video: Jim Jennings BAD AUDIO
March 15, 1995 |

Subclip

Jennings describes his Telegraph Hill house in San Francisco, which is centered around a cylindrical concrete circulation core. While he uses relatively cold materials such as glass, steel and concrete, due to the shapes of the spaces and attention to details, it creates a warm ambiance. Privacy is also ensured through a preference for indirect lighting or frosted glass, where a view is not available. He also describes his office and the unexpected lighting effects created by the custom designed furniture and doors.