Video Archive | Antoni Gaudi (5)

Anton Furst-clip_2556
During this part of the lecture Furst discusses his design of Gotham City for the 1989 “Batman” directed by Tim Burton. He...
Herman Hertzberger Part One
Herman Hertzberger comments on the difficulty of presenting new work every time he speaks at SCI-Arc because of the fact that his...
Herman Hertzberger Part One-clip_5247
When talking about his own strategies for high density housing, Herman Hertzberger discusses Le Corbusier, stressing how his...
Herman Hertzberger Part One-clip_5250
Herman Hertzberger shows a bench in the Park G?ell designed by Gaudi as an example of precision and poetics. He calls it one of...
Charles Jencks The Language Of Modern...
Charles Jencks argues that the harmony of modernism led to its eventual downfall, citing its reluctance to adapt to changing...

Anton Furst-clip_2556

View the Full Video: Anton Furst
March 7, 1990 | Video Lecturer:

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During this part of the lecture Furst discusses his design of Gotham City for the 1989 “Batman” directed by Tim Burton. He begins by explaining his inspirations. These influences include Hugh Ferriss’ Metropolis, Brutalism, Antonio Sant’Elia’s Futurist designs, and Shin Takamatsu’s locomotive-influenced buildings. Furst describes his drawings of different parts of Gotham, pointing out his references. Furst also mentions architects such as Otto Wagner, Louis Sullivan and Antoni Gaud? as inspirations. He presents images of the final set design, explaining the process and the result. To finish the lecture he describes the design and construction of the “Batmobile.”


Herman Hertzberger Part One

April 23, 1987 | Video Lecturer:
Introduction by:

Herman Hertzberger comments on the difficulty of presenting new work every time he speaks at SCI-Arc because of the fact that his work progresses very slowly. Discussing the interior of his music center in Utrecht he stresses the importance of not filling the entire hall with seats, in order to leave space for people to dance during concerts and to stand. He discusses his own strategies for high density housing, arguing that Le Corbusier’s work is misunderstood. His most recently completed project is for an addition to an existing museum in Berlin, for which he proposes a landscape of long, linear all?es.

Clips

Herman Hertzberger Part One-clip_5252
Herman Hertzberger Part One-clip_5252
Herman Hertzberger Part One-clip_5245
Herman Hertzberger Part One-clip_5245
Herman Hertzberger Part One-clip_5246
Herman Hertzberger Part One-clip_5246
Herman Hertzberger Part One-clip_5247
Herman Hertzberger Part One-clip_5247
Herman Hertzberger Part One-clip_5248
Herman Hertzberger Part One-clip_5248
Herman Hertzberger presents a design for an addition to an existing museum in Berlin in which he proposes a landscape of long,...

Herman Hertzberger Part One-clip_5247

View the Full Video: Herman Hertzberger Part One
April 23, 1987 | Video Lecturer:

Subclip

When talking about his own strategies for high density housing, Herman Hertzberger discusses Le Corbusier, stressing how his balcony designs provide not only a view, but privacy. Examining one of his own housing projects in Berlin, Hertzberger talks about how his daughter who is also an architect, designed and directed the construction of a children’s playground inspired by Gaudi.


Herman Hertzberger Part One-clip_5250

View the Full Video: Herman Hertzberger Part One
April 23, 1987 | Video Lecturer:

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Herman Hertzberger shows a bench in the Park G?ell designed by Gaudi as an example of precision and poetics. He calls it one of the most perfect pieces of architecture. Looking at the courtyard of the mosque in Cordoba, Spain, he characterizes the system of irrigation canals as the architectonic equivalent of the trees they water. The beauty in these examples is not the result of an artist or architect trying to create beauty, rather it comes out of the builder’s desire to find a simple solution to a problem.


Charles Jencks The Language Of Modern Architecture-clip_1399

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Charles Jencks argues that the harmony of modernism led to its eventual downfall, citing its reluctance to adapt to changing conditions of sensibilities and technologies. He describes Robert Venturi’s view of semantics and elemental syntax as a new social order of metaphors and signs. Jencks brings up Antoni Gaudi as a way of illustrating parallels between postmodernism and Art Nouveau, both operating outside of the language of reductivist modernism.