Video Archive | Arcadia (4)

Peter Cook Gallery Talk-clip_3255
Peter Cook discusses his own drawings. He points out his favorites, and describes “The Tower Metamorphosis.” He explains in...
Peter Cook
Peter Cook discusses the Archigram Group and shows photographs of various building. He talks about the Paradise Caf? designed by...
Peter Cook-clip_9396
Peter Cook explains the influence for his Sponge project, a competition entry done in collaboration with several of his...
Peter Cook-clip_9397
Peter Cook continues his discussion about an Arcadian project. He gives descriptions of the planned buildings and various types...

Peter Cook Gallery Talk-clip_3255

View the Full Video: Peter Cook Gallery Talk
January 1, 1982 | Video Lecturer:

Subclip

Peter Cook discusses his own drawings. He points out his favorites, and describes “The Tower Metamorphosis.” He explains in detail the “Arcadia” project, a proposal for a city, describing the site plan, the town hall, the offices, housing and the market square. Cook characterizes his work as contrasting artificiality and nature. The video’s color becomes distorted near the end.


Peter Cook

April 8, 1981 | Video Lecturer:
Introduction by:

Peter Cook discusses the Archigram Group and shows photographs of various building. He talks about the Paradise Caf? designed by Gunnar Asplund at the 1930 Stockholm Exhibition, and how the building got him interested in architecture. He explains the “the necessity of people,” who are “more audacious than one’s self.” Cook also discusses the heroic and practical aspects of architecture, and his projects; Plug-in City, Lump, and Sponge. He makes an analogy to patchwork quilting and architecture. He talks about a book he is currently working on a book about Arcadia, and gives examples of the portmanteau and its connection to the Arcadia project and his own work. Cook mentions the use of mesh as both a primary and secondary material, and shows several competition entries.

Clips

Peter Cook-clip_9396
Peter Cook-clip_9396
Themes:
Peter Cook explains the influence for his Sponge project, a competition entry done in collaboration with several of his...
Peter Cook-clip_9397
Peter Cook-clip_9397
Peter Cook continues his discussion about an Arcadian project. He gives descriptions of the planned buildings and various types...
Peter Cook-clip_9429
Peter Cook-clip_9429
Ray Kappe introduces Peter Cook and states the Archigram Group and second generation Chrysalis Group, which included Cook, have...
Peter Cook-clip_9432
Peter Cook-clip_9432
Peter Cook-clip_9434
Peter Cook-clip_9434
Themes: ,
Peter Cook continues his discussion about the use of mesh in construction. He mentions a project in Linz, Austria using layers of...

Peter Cook-clip_9396

View the Full Video: Peter Cook
April 8, 1981 | Video Lecturer:

Subclip

Peter Cook explains the influence for his Sponge project, a competition entry done in collaboration with several of his friends. The design was for a student center in Norway. He shows another competition entry for a project on Roosevelt Island in Manhattan. Cooks says the design group wanted to assimilate the work of Edward D. Stone. He shows the design of a library, in the shape of whale, in Trondheim, Norway. The plan includes an arcade for shopping. Cook points out he is currently working on a book about Arcadia. He also talks the tradition of portmanteau and its connection to the Arcadia project and his own work.


Peter Cook-clip_9397

View the Full Video: Peter Cook
April 8, 1981 | Video Lecturer:

Subclip

Peter Cook continues his discussion about an Arcadian project. He gives descriptions of the planned buildings and various types residents. He talks about a solar housing competition in Germany that may become the first project constructed with his partner, Christine Hawley. Cook shows an Arcadian plan for a design competition for a key manufacturer, and a design entry for a museum in Frankfurt, Germany to be integrated with an existing Gothic church. He also talks about the use of mesh instead of solid walls and mesh as both a primary and secondary material.