Video Archive | Architecture in China (17)

John Southern
Marcelyn Gow introduces John Southern. John Southern shows the progression of his own work and his interest in urban activism and...
Xu Weigo
Hernan Diaz Alonso introduces Xu Weigo, of XWG architecture studio and Tsinghua University in Beijing. Weigo discusses the...
Preston Scott Cohen Discretized Curves and Tectonic...
Preston Scott Cohen discusses his design of an arcade canopy in Manhattan, which serves as an outdoor passage way. He discusses...
Yung Ho Chang-clip_9377
Yung Ho Chang explains that there are two types of projects; THE project and The Other project. The former is concerned with big,...
Yung Ho Chang-clip_9379
Yung Ho Chang talks about his firm’s Other projects. He characterizes them as “miscellaneous.” He shows a pair of exterior...
Yung Ho Chang
Yung Ho Chang explains there are two types of projects; THE projects which are iconic buildings and The Other projects which are...
Yung Ho Chang-clip_9380
Yung Ho Chang discusses how he wanted to update the traditional Chinese folding privacy screen, typically made with a wood frame...
Stephanie Smith Lighten Up-clip_1489
Smith introduces her contribution to the Harvard Project on the City in the book Great Leap Forward. Her chapter...

Preston Scott Cohen Discretized Curves and Tectonic Language-clip_9433

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Preston Scott Cohen discusses his design of an arcade canopy in Manhattan, which serves as an outdoor passage way. He discusses Desargues’ Theorem of projective geometry, and shows several animated computer renderings. Cohen shows his design of a house which was part of the ORDOS program in China. He describes an art museum in Taiyuan, that “one wonders through without entering.” Cohen discusses the Tel Aviv Museum of Art in detail. He characterizes it as constrained by its site. Cohen draws an analogy between architecture and film, and describes the anatomical plan, “the result of slicing the body.”


Yung Ho Chang-clip_9377

View the Full Video: Yung Ho Chang
October 28, 2009 |

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Yung Ho Chang explains that there are two types of projects; THE project and The Other project. The former is concerned with big, iconic building, the latter addresses small, urban fabric, local projects. Chang presents a perspective to reconsider THE and The Other projects. He shows two THE projects. First, a house in Beijing, which reconfigured the traditional courtyard house plan and made economical use of the landscape. The house is made of laminated wood and rammed earth. Chang discusses the UFIDA software building near Beijing. He calls it more of a “living environment” because the employees spend so much in their offices. The project also has an alternative courtyard design which gets employees out of their offices to exercise, meditate or smoke.


Yung Ho Chang-clip_9379

View the Full Video: Yung Ho Chang
October 28, 2009 |

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Yung Ho Chang talks about his firm’s Other projects. He characterizes them as “miscellaneous.” He shows a pair of exterior metal sliding doors for an art gallery, and the interior of a restaurant in Shanghai with a tile roof designed to allow more light inside. Chang shows a transparent structural unit with bamboo veneer which is the basis for a project for the Venice Bienniale. He shows a project for the Victoria & Albert Museum in London which uses plastic paving blocks. The structure is an interior space in the museum’s courtyard. For another project Chang explains how his firm used honeycomb-shaped plastic modules to create the structure for a bathroom. He considers these plastic forms as a “major, major building material” for the future.


Yung Ho Chang

October 28, 2009 |
Introduction by:

Yung Ho Chang explains there are two types of projects; THE projects which are iconic buildings and The Other projects which are small and local. He shows examples of both types including THE projects such as a house made of laminated wood and rammed earth, and a software building designed as a “living environment.” For Other projects, Chang talks about a transparent structural unit with bamboo veneer for the Venice Biennale, and an art project for the Victoria & Albert Museum in London using plastic paving blocks. Chang considers plastic forms as a “major, major building material” for the future. He talks about a folding privacy screen traditionally made with a wood frame and rice paper which he has redesigned with Formica to replace both wood and rice paper. Chang shows his design for the upcoming Shanghai Corporate Pavilion for the Shanghai World Expo. He cites the Centre Pompidou as the source of inspiration for the design. He describes the functions of the building for the World Expo as “performing architecture.”

Clips

Yung Ho Chang-clip_9376
Yung Ho Chang-clip_9376
Eric Owen Moss begins his introduction of Yung Ho Chang by quoting a passage from Italo Calvino's Invisible Cities,...
Yung Ho Chang-clip_9377
Yung Ho Chang-clip_9377
Yung Ho Chang-clip_9379
Yung Ho Chang-clip_9379
Yung Ho Chang-clip_9380
Yung Ho Chang-clip_9380

Yung Ho Chang-clip_9380

View the Full Video: Yung Ho Chang
October 28, 2009 |

Subclip

Yung Ho Chang discusses how he wanted to update the traditional Chinese folding privacy screen, typically made with a wood frame and rice paper. He explains how he was able to construct a new design using Formica to replace both wood and rice paper. Chang shows a project which he says “is not directly related to architecture,” but then turns out to be “related to architecture thinking.” He shows a gourd-like fruit in China which is used as a utensil for scooping. Chang talks about how he decided to use the form to create the ceramic equivalent of the fruit to provide the same utility. He states that plastic, lightweight forms and other technologies are an active part of his firm’s practice. Chang shows his design for the upcoming Shanghai Corporate Pavilion for the Shanghai World Expo. He cites the Centre Pompidou as the source of inspiration for the design. He describes the functions of the building for the World Expo as “performing architecture.” Chang concludes his talk by showing the vegetable garden at his office. Employees eat the vegetables for lunch. The firm is also designing furniture and clothing.


Stephanie Smith Lighten Up-clip_1489

View the Full Video: Stephanie Smith Lighten Up
November 19, 2008 | Video Lecturer:

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Smith introduces her contribution to the Harvard Project on the City in the book Great Leap Forward. Her chapter addresses the connection between architecture and money. She then presents a project that takes inspiration from the Yurt, a portable, bent wood framed dwelling structure. Smith chronicles the construction and testing of the Yurt in the Philippines and exhibits the various iterations produced before arriving at a marketable product.