Video Archive | Architecture in Japan (23)

Atelier Bow Wow From Post Bubble City-clip_2079
Kajima describes the poject on Tokyo, the "Post Bubble City." Working with simple tools for documentation, the intention of the...
Waro Kishi and Ang Gin Wah
Peter Zellner introduces Japanese architect Waro Kishi and Singaporean architect Ang Gin Wah. Waro Kishi begins with a discussion...
Shin Takamatsu-clip_5325
Takamatsu presents several office and commercial buildings. Many designs, such as the Kirin Plaza in Osaka, incorporate...
Shin Takamatsu
Shin Takamatsu presents a many slides of his work, "machine gun style," as a translator provides English versions of Japanese...
Shin Takamatsu-clip_5326
Takamatsu presents three videos that use moving images, music and computer graphics to convey the spirit of three projects: the...
Shin Takamatsu-clip_5323
Shin Takamatsu jokes that the only Japanese architects who don't speak English are Tadao Ando and himself. A female translator...
Itsuko Hasegawa-clip_1452
Itsuko Hasegawa presents a selection of her early works that consist of small low cost residential projects for working class...
Tadao Ando Part Two
Through an English translation by George Kunihiro, Tadao Ando describes his design for a church on Mt. Rokko. The concrete is...

Atelier Bow Wow From Post Bubble City-clip_2079

Subclip

Kajima describes the poject on Tokyo, the “Post Bubble City.” Working with simple tools for documentation, the intention of the research is analyze existing buildings and urban conditions. Kajima also presents the result of the research: a guidebook to be used by the people of Tokyo.


Waro Kishi and Ang Gin Wah

March 22, 2000 | Video Lecturer: ,
Introduction by:

Peter Zellner introduces Japanese architect Waro Kishi and Singaporean architect Ang Gin Wah. Waro Kishi begins with a discussion of the cities of Singapore, Hong Kong, and Kyoto, stressing contemporary problems and issues. Later, Ang Gin Wah reflects on Singapore and the country’s transition. He shows his work and talks about his practice in the context of his interest in traditional building, Confucianism, and contemporary art and trends in Singapore.


Shin Takamatsu

Shin Takamatsu presents a many slides of his work, “machine gun style,” as a translator provides English versions of Japanese remarks. He reviews a wide range of commercial, residential, and religious projects. He maintains that he is inspired and incorporates elements of traditional Japanese architecture, yet arrives at designs that are far more dynamic and expressive using modern materials. After the slides, Takamatsu presents three videos that use moving images, music and computer graphics to convey the spirit of three projects: the Kirin Plaza in Osaka, the Earthtecture Sub-1 underground commercial building in Tokyo, and the Octagon tower proposed for the Shibuya district of Tokyo. After the videos, Takamatsu responds to questions from the audience.

Clips

Shin Takamatsu-clip_5322
Shin Takamatsu-clip_5322
Michael Rotondi introduces Shin Takmatsu. Takamatsu graduated with a doctorate in architecture from Kyoto University in 1980, and...
Shin Takamatsu-clip_5323
Shin Takamatsu-clip_5323
Shin Takamatsu jokes that the only Japanese architects who don't speak English are Tadao Ando and himself. A female translator...
Shin Takamatsu-clip_5325
Shin Takamatsu-clip_5325
Shin Takamatsu-clip_5326
Shin Takamatsu-clip_5326

Shin Takamatsu-clip_5326

View the Full Video: Shin Takamatsu
September 27, 1989 | Video Lecturer:

Subclip

Takamatsu presents three videos that use moving images, music and computer graphics to convey the spirit of three projects: the Kirin Plaza in Osaka, the Earthtecture Sub-1 underground commercial building in Tokyo, and the Octagon tower proposed for the Shibuya district of Tokyo. After the videos, Takamatsu responds to questions from the audience.


Shin Takamatsu-clip_5323

View the Full Video: Shin Takamatsu
September 27, 1989 | Video Lecturer:

Subclip

Shin Takamatsu jokes that the only Japanese architects who don’t speak English are Tadao Ando and himself. A female translator provides English versions of Japanese remarks. He warns that he will present many slides of his work, “machine gun style. Takamatsu reviews several office, residential, and religious projects. He maintains that he is inspired and incorporates elements of traditional Japanese architecture, yet arrives at
designs that are far more dynamic and expressive using modern materials. His Pharaoh House in particular, located in the corner of a busy intersection employs novel forms to create a fortress facade, while allowing light to penetrate to the interior.


Itsuko Hasegawa-clip_1452

View the Full Video: Itsuko Hasegawa
March 26, 1986 | Video Lecturer:

Subclip

Itsuko Hasegawa presents a selection of her early works that consist of small low cost residential projects for working class clients in Japan. Hasegawa address her inspiration from traditional Japanese countryside folk houses that have a very strong connection to nature through organic forms and solutions.