Video Archive | Architecture in San Francisco (6)

Stanley Saitowitz
Stanley Saitowitz discusses several projects, mostly in north California. He argues that modernism offers two path--“form and...
Stanley Saitowitz-clip_9287
Stanley Saitowitz argues that modernism offers two paths: “form and meaning,” and “space and experience.” He places Frank...
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Stanley Saitowitz discusses his work, including a house in San Diego based on his “bar house,” plan with its “linear...
Stanley Saitowitz-clip_9289
Stanley Saitowitz shows several public buildings he designed including the Oxbow School in Napa. He discusses the renovation of a...
Stanley Saitowitz
Following an introduction by Coy Howard, Stanley Saitowitz presents a range of projects which he categorizes as residential,...
Robert Marquis Form Energy And Humanism-clip_4253
Shelly Kappe introduces Robert Marquis, noting that he was born in Germany, but moved to the United States at an early age. He...

Stanley Saitowitz

September 24, 2003 | Video Lecturer:
Introduction by:

Stanley Saitowitz discusses several projects, mostly in north California. He argues that modernism offers two path–“form and meaning,” and “space and experience”–and he is “more interested in space than in meaning.” In describing his design of houses, he refers to them as “linear configurations” and “bar houses,” because you can look through them from one room to another. He describes in detail the renovation a Victorian building in San Francisco for his office. He shows the Embarcadero Ribbon in San Francisco, a public landscape project in which he collaborated with Vito Acconci and Barbara Staufacher. Saitowitz concludes with a statement explaining his interest in “expanded architecture.”

Clips

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Eric Owen Moss introduces Stanley Saitowitz by characterizing San Francisco and Los Angeles as thesis and antithesis, and...
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Stanley Saitowitz-clip_9287
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Stanley Saitowitz-clip_9287

View the Full Video: Stanley Saitowitz
September 24, 2003 | Video Lecturer:

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Stanley Saitowitz argues that modernism offers two paths: “form and meaning,” and “space and experience.” He places Frank Gehry, Zaha Hadid, and others in the former category and Robert Venturi in the latter. Saitowitz says he considers this discourse part of his work. He shows photographs of his work and explains the first set of projects have to do with “time and space.” Saitowitz states he is “more interested in space than in meaning,” and the “invisible.” He talks about other projects as systems, and “instrumentality,” and others as “materiality.” He shows photographs of recent work, mostly in northern California. Houses with what he calls “linear configurations.” These “bar houses” as he suggests, are “Usonian houses for the rich.”


Stanley Saitowitz-clip_9288

View the Full Video: Stanley Saitowitz
September 24, 2003 | Video Lecturer:

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Stanley Saitowitz discusses his work, including a house in San Diego based on his “bar house,” plan with its “linear configurations.” He comments that the method of construction is similar to the Case Study Houses. He discusses a 21,000 square foot house made of concrete and glass. He describes his office in San Francisco, a Victorian building whose redesign became a model for urban in-fill development. He shows another project with artists’ studio space on the first floor with two loft floors above. Some these designs he describes as “concrete egg crates.” Saitowitz discusses a competition for public housing block in Chicago, which made the traditional open courtyards private. He also shows a loft building project in Mexico City.


Stanley Saitowitz-clip_9289

View the Full Video: Stanley Saitowitz
September 24, 2003 | Video Lecturer:

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Stanley Saitowitz shows several public buildings he designed including the Oxbow School in Napa. He discusses the renovation of a building for the University of Waterloo school of architecture in Toronto, describing his “weaving” of the
design with the existing building, and features such as using the nearby river for cooling. Saitowitz also describes a project for the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory studying energy efficiencies. Other projects include a parking structure for a UCSF’s biotech campus in Mission Bay, San Francisco. Saitowitz describes the library interiors in Wurster Hall, at UC Berkeley.


Stanley Saitowitz

March 7, 2001 | Video Lecturer:

Following an introduction by Coy Howard, Stanley Saitowitz presents a range of projects which he categorizes as residential, urban, and public. Saitowitz describes his interest in residential work that is site specific, his struggles integrating certain structure and material types into the urban fabric of San Francisco, and his interest in connectivity in public projects. He expresses a desire to expand the role of space and the reduction of form, hoping to frame moments and events through his work.

Clips

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Stanley Saitowitz-clip_2365
Themes:
Coy Howard introduces Stanley Saitowitz recounting a tale of artistry and identity that affected his first meeting with Saitowitz.
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Stanley Saitowitz-clip_2369
Stanley Saitowitz begins his lecture with an explanation of San Francisco, its landscape, diversity, history and the relationship...
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Stanley Saitowitz-clip_2374
Saitowitz proceeds with his lecture, discussing several urban projects through which he has attempted to challenge conservative...
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Saitowitz describes a park in Indiana which integrates elements derived from site and program requirements. The original attempt...
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Stanley Saitowitz-clip_2380
Saitowitz concludes his lecture with a presentation of a synagogue and ceremonial objects and his New England Holocaust...

Robert Marquis Form Energy And Humanism-clip_4253

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Shelly Kappe introduces
Robert Marquis, noting that he was born in Germany, but moved to the United States at an early age. He studied at the University of Southern California and at La Accademia di Belle Arti in Florence. He returned to San Francisco, California where he opened his own practice in 1953. His body of work has been published, awarded and recognized over the years, while simultaneously lecturing and writing. He has been published in various journals.