Video Archive | Aerial photos (4)

Stanislaus Fung
Stanislaus Fung lectures on Chinese gardens as well as the progression of building practice in China. He discusses in detail...
Stanislaus Fung-clip_5482
Fung presents a series of aerial photographs, which are of interest in that not showing the perspective of the passerby, and...
Konrad Wachsmann On Charles Eames Part Two
Following a screening of Powers Of Ten, Konrad Wachsmann recalls the intense research effort for a National Aquarium for...
Konrad Wachsmann On Charles Eames Part Two-clip_3075
Wachsmann shows aerial photographs of Rome taken by Charles Eames. He uses the history of the construction of St. Peter's...

Stanislaus Fung

September 26, 2001 | Video Lecturer:
Introduction by:

Stanislaus Fung lectures on Chinese gardens as well as the progression of building practice in China. He discusses in detail Zhuozheng Yuan, a celebrated 16th century garden in Suzhou, whose name could be translated “The Garden of the Unsuccessful Politician,” or “The Garden of Artless Administration.” He shows drawings of the garden from different eras showing different ideas of the boundaries of the garden. The garden is not a fixed object: mapping becomes a tracing of variable fields of foci. Fung discusses the role of temporal change in the garden, as seen in seasonal and night views. Extending the discussion of temporality into the present day, Fung argues that tourist guide books, often a mishmash of past and present, serve to connect past and present in a stimulating way. By lacking hierarchy, the compel the reader piece the city together in an individual way. He discusses the incorporation of individual memory and cultural experience. Fung goes on to discuss the difficulties in understanding China and Chinese building practice, in that image and media are the main source of information rather than personal experience.

Clips

Stanislaus Fung-clip_5479
Stanislaus Fung-clip_5479
Stanislaus Fung-clip_5482
Stanislaus Fung-clip_5482
Stanislaus Fung-clip_5483
Stanislaus Fung-clip_5483
Fung argues that tourist guide books, by lacking hierarchy, compel the reader piece the city together in an individual way. He...

Stanislaus Fung-clip_5482

View the Full Video: Stanislaus Fung
September 26, 2001 | Video Lecturer:

Subclip

Fung presents a series of aerial photographs, which are of interest in that not showing the perspective of the passerby, and showing both historic elements and contemporary contextualization. Fung argues that tourist guide books, often a mishmash of past and present, serve to connect past and present in a stimulating way.


Konrad Wachsmann On Charles Eames Part Two

January 1, 1978 | Video Lecturer:

Following a screening of Powers Of Ten, Konrad Wachsmann recalls the intense research effort for a National Aquarium for the U.S. Bicentennial, that transformed the Eames office into a deep sea laboratory. He briefly mentions the Eames-designed exhibition Nehru: His life and his India. Wachsmann shows aerial photographs of Rome taken by Charles Eames. He uses the history of the construction of St. Peter’s Basilica to illustrate the conflict between old and new. He recalls the engineer Norman Bruns, who often work with Eames, but who also ran a music store. Wachsman describes Bruns’ fascination with the technology of musical instruments. Wachsmann concludes his lecture by asking Elizabeth Bruns to play. Bruns plays Bach’s Arioso on the violin.

Clips

Konrad Wachsmann On Charles Eames Part Two-clip_3074
Konrad Wachsmann On Charles Eames Part Two-clip_3074
Wachsmann recalls the intense research effort for a National Aquarium for the U.S. Bicentennial transforming the Eames office...
Konrad Wachsmann On Charles Eames Part Two-clip_3075
Konrad Wachsmann On Charles Eames Part Two-clip_3075
Konrad Wachsmann On Charles Eames Part Two-clip_3076
Konrad Wachsmann On Charles Eames Part Two-clip_3076
Konrad Wachsmann On Charles Eames Part Two-clip_3077
Konrad Wachsmann On Charles Eames Part Two-clip_3077

Konrad Wachsmann On Charles Eames Part Two-clip_3075

Subclip

Wachsmann shows aerial photographs of Rome taken by Charles Eames. He uses the history of the construction of St. Peter’s Basilica to illustrate the conflict between old and new. He recalls the engineer Norman Bruns, who often work with Eames, but who also ran a music store.