Video Archive | Artificial life (4)

Mediascapes Symposium-clip_2927
Manuel De Landa discusses the application of evolutionary ideas to computing, with an emphasis on the development of search...
Manuel De Landa-clip_2358
De Landa organizes his talk around his recent paper "The Role of Cities in the New Philosophy of History." He argues against the...
Nicolas Gessler
Nicholas Gessler talks about his anthropological work which centers on artificial life, computational studies and simulations. He...
Marcos Novak-clip_2116
Marcos Novak begins by explaining his process for the construction of worlds and images. The first technique he addresses is...

Mediascapes Symposium-clip_2927

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Manuel De Landa discusses the application of evolutionary ideas to computing, with an emphasis on the development of search algorithms. He then proposes the application of genetic algorithms, which he describes as a search tool and visualization tool that will generate new results indefinitely. Finally, De Landa speculates on the creation of a virtual creature, based on a bacterium or micro-organism with a metabolism and chromosomes. He identifies this development as the first step in the simulation of artificial life.


Manuel De Landa-clip_2358

View the Full Video: Manuel De Landa
November 3, 1999 | Video Lecturer:

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De Landa organizes his talk around his recent paper “The Role of Cities in the New Philosophy of History.” He argues against the reigning “top-down” analysis of society, and offers models of artificial life, simulation, and emergence for analyzing the growth of institutions and larger entities, such as city-states. Utilizing economies of scale and economies of agglomeration, he looks at models including Venetian markets and the Northern Italian region of Emilia-Romagna. He concludes with a discussion of the rhizome in relation to the organizational models of Apple and Microsoft.


Nicolas Gessler

March 14, 1997 |
Introduction by:

Nicholas Gessler talks about his anthropological work which centers on artificial life, computational studies and simulations. He asks, “What is artificial culture?” and outlines a technological approach to formulating an answer. Gessler cites the work of others in his field showing examples by Jay Forester, John Conway, and Karl Sims. He also talks about writer, Stanis?aw Lem, whom Gessler calls an “anticipatory philosopher of science.” Gessler discusses simulation and presents Creatures by Sims and two other of his videos. Gessler mentions the band, Einst?rzende Neubauten, a favorite because it appeals to his “anthropological background.”


Marcos Novak-clip_2116

View the Full Video: Marcos Novak
January 31, 1997 | Video Lecturer:

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Marcos Novak begins by explaining his process for the construction of worlds and images. The first technique he addresses is morphing. This technique produces an imaginary construct based on real data and imagery. He then demonstrates his concept of perceiving the image as field with a book cover composed of a fusion of fields. Next, Novak presents his work in computer animation and explains how this technique creates its own conception of space. Finally, he documents some of his work with generative mechanisms, including artificial life and artifacts constructed with the Lindenmayer system.