Video Archive | Biotics (5)

Philip Beesley Diffusive Architecture
Marcelyn Gow characterizes Philip Beesley's work as a reconsideration of the relationship between technology, energy and...
Philip Beesley Diffusive Architecture-clip_4844
Marcelyn Gow introduces Philip Beesley, characterizing his work as a reconsideration of the relationship between technology,...
Philip Beesley Diffusive Architecture-clip_4850
Beesley discusses the densely layered Palatine in Rome, geotextiles, engineered skin cells, and protocells. .
Philip Beesley Diffusive Architecture-clip_4858
Philip Beesley is a Professor of Architecture at the University of Waterloo School of Architecture in Toronto, Canada. In...
Philip Beesley Diffusive Architecture-clip_4864
Beesley positions his work as a response to humanism.

Philip Beesley Diffusive Architecture

September 21, 2011 | Video Lecturer:
Introduction by:

Marcelyn Gow characterizes Philip Beesley’s work as a reconsideration of the relationship between technology, energy and biological processes. Beesley discusses the densely layered Palatine in Rome, geotextiles, engineered skin cells, and protocells. He presents several geotextile projects including Haystack Veil, Erratics Net, Orpheus Filter, Endothelium, and Hylozoic Ground, created for the Venice Biennale 2010 Canadian Pavilion.

 

 

Clips

Philip Beesley Diffusive Architecture-clip_4844
Philip Beesley Diffusive Architecture-clip_4844
Philip Beesley Diffusive Architecture-clip_4850
Philip Beesley Diffusive Architecture-clip_4850
Philip Beesley Diffusive Architecture-clip_4858
Philip Beesley Diffusive Architecture-clip_4858
Philip Beesley Diffusive Architecture-clip_4864
Philip Beesley Diffusive Architecture-clip_4864

Philip Beesley Diffusive Architecture-clip_4858

Subclip

Philip Beesley is a Professor of Architecture at the University of Waterloo School of Architecture in Toronto, Canada. In describing Beesley’s work, Marcelyn Gow says that it reconsiders the relationship between technology, energy and biological processes in architecture, focusing on synthetic architectural systems; kinetic environments that are informed by the formation, function or structure of biologically produced substances and processes. Beesley’s lecture presents his explorations through a series of projects of diffusive forms that offer the maximum possible reticulation with the atmosphere. This work is founded on a sense of intimacy and touch, and an individual experience that builds into some common experience. Beesley’s explorations suggest that the strategies of diffusive forms might offer possibilities of a new responsive architecture. In this clip Beesley presents several geotextile projects including Haystack Veil, Erratics Net, Orpheus Filter,
Endothelium, and Hylozoic Ground, created for the Venice Biennale 2010 Canadian Pavilion.