Video Archive | Boston (8)

Peter Walker Before The Memorial-clip_3314
Ming Fung describes Peter Walker's work as “a blend of art, architecture, and landscape architecture in which traditional...
Henry Cobb-clip_4902
Henry Cobb describes a series of early towers, and then focuses on Boston's John Hancock Building. Cobb talks about the existing...
Henry Cobb
Henry Cobb comments that he will use his lecture to talk about his tower projects, as well as reflect on his career. Recalling...
The Next L. A. Kevin Starr-clip_4265
Kevin Starr reviews the background of the Los Angeles region, arguing that different conquests have drastically changed the...
Mario Gandelsonas-clip_9391
Mario Gandelsonas discusses his drawings of the Boston grid, “to show the difference between the head and the neck,” adding...
Kevin Lynch Interview Dream And Reality Architecture And...
In this MIT Department of Architecture educational video resource, Kevin Lynch brings his formidable knowledge and experience of...
Kevin Lynch Interview Dream And Reality Architecture And...
Kevin Lynch opens by giving an account of his past. He describes his childhood, his parents, and his education from Yale and MIT....
Kevin Lynch Interview Dream And Reality Architecture And...
Kevin Lynch discusses the Government Center Project in Boston as a means of successful urban planning. Lynch describes typical...

Peter Walker Before The Memorial-clip_3314

View the Full Video: Peter Walker Before The Memorial
January 30, 2008 | Video Lecturer:

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Ming Fung describes Peter Walker’s work as “a blend of art, architecture, and landscape architecture in which traditional hierarchies are abandoned in favor of a new holistic framework in which the total immersive experience of the participant is the only arbiter.” Walker discusses his influences, his interests, and a garden that he participated in on top of a Georgian row house in the Back Bay neighborhood of Boston.


Henry Cobb

November 19, 2003 | Video Lecturer:
Introduction by:

Henry Cobb comments that he will use his lecture to talk about his tower projects, as well as reflect on his career. Recalling Robert Venturi’s idea of the “double-functioning element,” he describes architecture as both dream and function. Cobb describes a series of early towers, and then focuses on Boston’s John Hancock Building. Cobb talks about the existing site conditions of neighboring Copley Square, as well as the political motivations that shaped the project. Cobb contrasts the muteness of tower forms with the verbosity of signage. He discusses his intention to manipulate the cube into a form that changes shape as the observer moves around it. Cobb argues that skyscrapers meet the ground, not the sky, and looks for the typology to change from portraying authority to portraying diversity.

Clips

Henry Cobb-clip_4901
Henry Cobb-clip_4901
Henry Cobb comments that he will use his lecture to talk about his tower projects, as well as reflect on his career. Recalling...
Henry Cobb-clip_4902
Henry Cobb-clip_4902
Henry Cobb-clip_4903
Henry Cobb-clip_4903

The Next L. A. Kevin Starr-clip_4265

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Kevin Starr reviews the background of the Los Angeles region, arguing that different conquests have drastically changed the natural and cultural environment. He compares Los Angeles to Boston and San Francisco, describing how the DNA of each city continues to play a role in their development.


Mario Gandelsonas-clip_9391

View the Full Video: Mario Gandelsonas
April 1, 1992 |

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Mario Gandelsonas discusses his drawings of the Boston grid, “to show the difference between the head and the neck,” adding the layout of the city has a “radial-concentric tendency.” He points out how New Haven has a similar a nine-square grid pattern. Gandelsonas talks about Chicago and shows drawings of its one mile grid and its diagonal streets. He discusses Marcel Duchamp’s readymades, stressing their randomness and lack of context. Gandelsonas shows a series of architectural or design projects where details or objects are misplaced such as a house which was moved and placed “the wrong way” at its new location. He shows photographs of a multi-building house he designed and calls it a “neurotic house.” For the way it creates, “relaxation and anxiety.”


Kevin Lynch Interview Dream And Reality Architecture And Urban Planning

In this MIT Department of Architecture educational video resource, Kevin Lynch brings his formidable knowledge and experience of urban planning to an interview with Anne Buttimer. Lynch answers questions about his theories on city development while dealing with the political struggles and economic realities of his profession. He discusses his planning project for downtown Boston as a means of relating a successful example of how he was able to revive a decrepit urban area and make it a profitable experience for the developers and the inhabitants.

Clips

Kevin Lynch Interview Dream And Reality Architecture And...
Kevin Lynch Interview Dream And Reality Architecture And Urban Planning-clip_1345
Kevin Lynch Interview Dream And Reality Architecture And...
Kevin Lynch Interview Dream And Reality Architecture And Urban Planning-clip_1348
Kevin Lynch Interview Dream And Reality Architecture And...
Kevin Lynch Interview Dream And Reality Architecture And Urban Planning-clip_1349
Kevin Lynch Interview Dream And Reality Architecture And...
Kevin Lynch Interview Dream And Reality Architecture And Urban Planning-clip_1350

Kevin Lynch Interview Dream And Reality Architecture And Urban Planning-clip_1345

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Kevin Lynch opens by giving an account of his past. He describes his childhood, his parents, and his education from Yale and MIT. He, also, talks about his influences from past teachers like Frank Lloyd Wright, and first experiences with urban planning.


Kevin Lynch Interview Dream And Reality Architecture And Urban Planning-clip_1348

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Kevin Lynch discusses the Government Center Project in Boston as a means of successful urban planning. Lynch describes typical urban development patterns and how those patterns helped him realize a concept for the commission. He goes through the steps of his design and describes how political interests and economics have the ultimate say in how urban plans take shape.