Video Archive | Brasilia (1)

Rob Wellington Quigley-clip_4694
Quigley begins by stressing the possession of architecture by its inhabitants, either the initial intended users or future users....

Rob Wellington Quigley-clip_4694

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March 31, 1982 | Video Lecturer:

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Quigley begins by stressing the possession of architecture by its inhabitants, either the initial intended users or future users. He argues that architecture needs to take abuse, and that it’s a mistake to design to a highly specified static state. He notes that in Oscar Niemeyer’s Brasilia, the adjacencies are the spaces that people use socially. He lists aspects of the built environment in San Diego that impact his work, such as bungalows, US Navy structures, and the Spanish heritage. Quigley’s main interest is in the emotional value of architecture and the social patterns it enables.