Video Archive | Buckminster Fuller (5)

David Smith Cities And Globalization-clip_5437
Eric Kahn introduces sociologist David Smith's work on cities as part of the global economy, citing systems thinking of...
Peter Pearce-clip_5525
Peter Pearce describes the evolution of building structures using modern materials able to support tension. He notes that a lot...
Jay Baldwin
Jay Baldwin, an industrial designer and former student of Buckminster Fuller, presents his work realizing Fuller's geodesic dome...
Bud Goldstone-clip_9374
Bud Goldstone says there were 5,000 inventions as a result of the Apollo program. He mentions several analytical studies based on...
Alternative Architecture Practices-clip_5926
Glen Small introduces the panelists as architects who work outside of "mainstream architecture." Rick Davidson reviews his career...

Peter Pearce-clip_5525

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September 13, 1996 | Video Lecturer:

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Peter Pearce describes the evolution of building structures using modern materials able to support tension. He notes that a lot of the most innovative designs are produced outside of engineering and architecture. In the first half of the twentieth century, industry was highly innovative, and Buckminster Fuller made a career of attempting to apply those innovations to architecture.


Bud Goldstone-clip_9374

View the Full Video: Bud Goldstone
November 18, 1981 |

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Bud Goldstone says there were 5,000 inventions as a result of the Apollo program. He mentions several analytical studies based on photographs from the space missions; including one in which shellfish production is measured by the color of the water, and other studies evaluating land use. He details spin-off products which resulted from the space program. Goldstone discusses Buckminster Fuller’s geodesic domes as part of the space program. He also mentions a Teflon-coated fabric used for the roof of the Detroit Tigers stadium, and other architectural applications of aerospace technologies. He mentions a hand-held laser wire-stripper invented during the space program which he predicts will “become a 100 million-dollar-a-year industry.” He also mentions other products and devices, such as robotics which can have the potential to make money for anyone wanting to get involved. Goldstone shares a list of 2000 NASA inventions currently not being developed. He encourages the audience to consider these as opportunities in which to make money. Among the inventions discussed between Goldstone and the audience is a drafting ink dryer.


Alternative Architecture Practices-clip_5926

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Glen Small introduces the panelists as architects who work outside of “mainstream architecture.” Rick Davidson reviews his career trajectory, from Marion Manley’s office in Miami, studying with Buckminster Fuller, being institutionalized, working for Disney, and becoming a full-time antiwar activist.