Video Archive | Clients (15)

Wolf Prix What’s the Difference Number One
Prix discusses his interest in architecture as society rather than surface and form. He reccomends resistance to tools and...
Wolf Prix What’s the Difference Number One-clip_4877
Prix presents several projects, describing the importance of finding new solutions without being distracted by the notion of a...
Henry Cobb Eric Owen Moss Conversation-clip_4909
Henry Cobb talks about the window and glass issues that emerged after the completion of his John Hancock Tower in Boston. This...
George Yu
George Yu presents a wide range of his recent projects, varying in scale from a gallery installation to a shopping center of over...
Gaetano Pesce-clip_5443
Pesce presents a showroom for children's clothing which contains two door sizes: a reference to Madonna and child iconography....
Wolf Prix Discussion-clip_6110
Wolf Prix begins this conversation with students by speaking about working with clients. He recalls how one design lost the...
Frank Israel-clip_5114
Frank Israel discusses the School of the Arts project for UC Riverside, which combines the school's programs in theater arts,...
Frank Israel
This event did not take place at SCI-Arc. Most likely it was UCLA. Frank Israel begins by admitting that although most architects...

Wolf Prix What’s the Difference Number One

September 19, 2011 |
Introduction by:

Prix discusses his interest in architecture as society rather than surface and form. He reccomends resistance to tools and technologies that push too narrowly in one direction. He argues that virtual public spaces without a physical component are not truly public. Prix presents a series of quotes, thoughts and ideas on complexity, problem solving, and rule-breaking. Prix presents several projects, describing the importance of finding new solutions without being distracted by the notion of a perfect solution. He explains his back and forth, analog and digital methodology. He argues that imperfections and chance occurrences can generate emotional content. He discusses client relationships in terms of the balance of what they want and what he hopes to achieve. He stresses the importance of fighting for projects, arguing that radical architecture is not just in the idea itself but in the building. Prix concludes with several projects of drastically differing scales. He addresses the integration of monumentality and dynamism. In principle he defends working in autocratic political contexts today as analogous to working for the Catholic Church in the past, but personally refuses to work on projects that conform to autocratic ideals. Prix discusses materials and fabrication, showing examples of ship building technologies combined with forms made from hand bent reeds.

Clips

Wolf Prix What’s the Difference Number One-clip_4876
Wolf Prix What’s the Difference Number One-clip_4876
Wolf Prix What’s the Difference Number One-clip_4877
Wolf Prix What’s the Difference Number One-clip_4877
Wolf Prix What’s the Difference Number One-clip_4878
Wolf Prix What’s the Difference Number One-clip_4878

Wolf Prix What’s the Difference Number One-clip_4877

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Prix presents several projects, describing the importance of finding new solutions without being distracted by the notion of a perfect solution. He explains his back and forth, analog and digital methodology. He argues that imperfections and chance occurrences can generate emotional content. He discusses client relationships in terms of the balance of what they want and what he hopes to achieve. He stresses the importance of fighting for projects, arguing that radical architecture is not just in the idea itself but in the building.


George Yu

September 28, 2005 | Video Lecturer:
Introduction by:

George Yu presents a wide range of his recent projects, varying in scale from a gallery installation to a shopping center of over one million square feet. Yu divides the lecture into three distinct components, documenting work, living, and shopping spaces. He discusses extensively his successes and difficulties working in collaboration with clients. Finally, Yu discusses his office’s engagement with technology and design for interaction.

Clips

George Yu-clip_2721
George Yu-clip_2721
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George Yu-clip_2723
George Yu-clip_2723
Yu discusses a proposal for Sony world headquarters in Tokyo. He introduces the concept of just-in-time space: flexible and...
George Yu-clip_2725
George Yu-clip_2725
Yu introduces a selection of his residential projects. The first demonstrates the challenge of consolidating an unusual plan with...
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George Yu-clip_2727

Gaetano Pesce-clip_5443

View the Full Video: Gaetano Pesce
November 14, 1997 | Video Lecturer:

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Pesce presents a showroom for children’s clothing which contains two
door sizes: a reference to Madonna and child iconography. The coloration and patterning of the floor became an important element in the design. Pesce discusses the importance of exceptional clients who trust you. He responds to questions about his use of materials.


Wolf Prix Discussion-clip_6110

View the Full Video: Wolf Prix Discussion
March 20, 1997 |

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Wolf Prix begins this conversation with students by speaking about working with clients. He recalls how one design lost the original client but then found another. Michael Rotondi asks about “building the sketch.” Prix stresses the “moment of conception” and claims that the sketch contains light, shadow, smells and tactile senations, and thus, connects the head and the heart. He states that architecture is more than constructed space and that it should provoke.


Frank Israel-clip_5114

View the Full Video: Frank Israel
February 16, 1995 | Video Lecturer: ,

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Frank Israel discusses the School of the Arts project for UC Riverside, which combines the school’s programs in theater arts, music, dance, writing, sculpture, painting and art history in a single building. He won the commission with a competition entry scheme in which a large roof became a landscape and mirrored the historic arroyo adjacent to the site. Israel describes how refreshing it was to work with clients who wanted more radical schemes and who wanted a building that would change the identity of the campus. The resulting design achieves a balance, in which the landscape and open elements are as important as the building forms.


Frank Israel

This event did not take place at SCI-Arc. Most likely it was UCLA. Frank Israel begins by admitting that although most architects hate their clients, they are important because there would be no work without them. Discussing a home addition project he did for Wesley and Marla Strick, he recalls that they asked for a third level to be added that could be a bedroom, living room, and bathroom in a single space. A house he designed for a married couple, both doctors, was on a steep site in Berkeley terraced into four levels up the hill. His School of the Arts project for UC Riverside combines the school’s programs in theater arts, music, dance, writing, sculpture, painting and art history under a single, complex roof.

Clips

Frank Israel-clip_5110
Frank Israel-clip_5110
This event did not take place at SCI-Arc. Richard Weinstein introduces Frank Israel, characterizing his work as an unforced...
Frank Israel-clip_5111
Frank Israel-clip_5111
Frank Israel-clip_5112
Frank Israel-clip_5112
Discussing a home addition project he did for Wesley and Marla Strick, Frank Israel recalls that they asked for a third level...
Frank Israel-clip_5113
Frank Israel-clip_5113
Frank Israel discusses a house he designed for a married couple, both doctors, on a steep site in Berkeley that is terraced into...
Frank Israel-clip_5114
Frank Israel-clip_5114
Frank Israel discusses the School of the Arts project for UC Riverside, which combines the school's programs in theater arts,...