Video Archive | Climate (10)

Solar Decathlon 2011 Exhibition Discussion
Ming Fung leads a discussion of SCI-Arc and Caltech's entry in the U.S. Department of Energy 2011 Solar Decathlon. Event...
Raimund Abraham-clip_3855
Abraham presents his own home in Mexico,, describing his walks around the site, and how the climate influenced the design. The...
Lindy Roy-clip_6001
Roy describes her proposal for the MoMA P.S. 1 courtyard, which was to create an adaptable microclimate to refresh visitors. The...
Mike Davis
Mike Davis discusses weather in Los Angeles, specifically the westerly jet stream known as "The Pineapple Express." Davis...
Mike Davis-clip_4868
Michael Rotondi introduces SCI-Arc's lecture series and gives a brief description of upcoming events. Rotondi welcomes Mike...
Mike Davis-clip_4869
Mike Davis discusses weather in Los Angeles, specifically the westerly jet stream known as "The Pineapple Express." Davis...
Mike Davis-clip_4870
Mike Davis discusses the complexity of California's Mediterranean climate, arguing for a new "environmental epistemology."
Mike Davis-clip_4914
Mike Davis calls for a rethinking of California's resource and disaster planning. Noting the extreme hydroclimatic shifts...

Solar Decathlon 2011 Exhibition Discussion

Ming Fung leads a discussion of SCI-Arc and Caltech’s entry in the U.S. Department of Energy 2011 Solar Decathlon. Event participants contrast their Compact Hyper-Insulated Prototype (CHIP) with the nineteen other entries. Wes Jones explains the team’s desire to address the competition criteria without regard for traditional images of a house. They debate the imagery of CHIP, and the creation of an architectural icons. Wes Jones discusses the process by which the team arrived at the CHIP design, noting the long sequence of interresting iterations and alternatives. Ming Fung asks about the team’s strategy for shipping the house from Los Angeles to Washington. Brian Zentmyer discusses the decision not to follow the example of most previous Decathlon teams and build an easily-transportable modular design. Andrew Gong and Cole Hershkowitz discuss their design of CHIP’s electrical systems, especially control mechanisms and interactive features. Ming Fung asks participants how much they used prior knowledge and how much they learned on the job. Dwayne Olyer discusses the relationship between architects and engineers, and the process of prioritization.

Clips

Solar Decathlon 2011 Exhibition Discussion-clip_5832
Solar Decathlon 2011 Exhibition Discussion-clip_5832
Solar Decathlon 2011 Exhibition Discussion-clip_5834
Solar Decathlon 2011 Exhibition Discussion-clip_5834
Solar Decathlon 2011 Exhibition Discussion-clip_5837
Solar Decathlon 2011 Exhibition Discussion-clip_5837

Raimund Abraham-clip_3855

View the Full Video: Raimund Abraham
March 3, 2010 | Video Lecturer:

Subclip

Abraham presents his own home in Mexico,, describing his walks around the site, and how the climate influenced the design. The building consists of a large roof structure that covers both interior and exterior spaces. Abraham intended to emphasize the weight of the roof itself both for it’s stability and in hopes of increasing awareness of the architecture. He presents the Austrian Cultural Forum in New York, describing the building as three towers: a stair tower, a core, and a glass tower which combine in an unusually tall and narrow site.


Lindy Roy-clip_6001

View the Full Video: Lindy Roy
January 16, 2002 | Video Lecturer:

Subclip

Roy describes her proposal for the MoMA P.S. 1 courtyard, which was to create an adaptable microclimate to refresh visitors. The project had a very short timeline, and minimal budget of $50 000. Roy describes a proposal for a series of adaptable barges to provide social and tourist services for Cancer Alley, in Lousisiana.


Mike Davis

Mike Davis discusses weather in Los Angeles, specifically the westerly jet stream known as “The Pineapple Express.” Davis outlines the history of damage caused by natural disasters in Southern California, and he notes how popular culture has a fascination with the destruction of Los Angeles. He discusses the complexity of California’s Mediterranean climate, arguing for a new “environmental epistemology.” He calls for a rethinking of California’s resource and disaster planning. Noting the extreme hydroclimatic shifts throughout California history, Davis suggests a disruption of capitalist hydraulic civilization in California is almost inevitable.

Clips

Mike Davis-clip_4868
Mike Davis-clip_4868
Mike Davis-clip_4869
Mike Davis-clip_4869
Mike Davis-clip_4870
Mike Davis-clip_4870
Mike Davis-clip_4914
Mike Davis-clip_4914
Mike Davis-clip_4915
Mike Davis-clip_4915