Video Archive | Columns (6)

Jeffrey Kipnis & Eric Owen Moss Look You Got It All...
Eric Owen Moss discusses in detail the Trivida office, and the Waffle building in terms of the relationship between design and...
Christian De Portzamparc Part One-clip_6104
Portzamparc describes a couple of concert halls he has designed. The Luxembourg Philharmonic is located beside a office tower in...
Aldo Van Eyck-clip_3242
Aldo van Eyck's presentation is followed by a panel discussion with Christian Norberg-Schulz an an unidentified woman....
Herman Hertzberger-clip_2649
Hertzberger discusses the implementation of columns within his buildings. Typical of a free plan, he strives to design the...
Herman Hertzberger-clip_546
Herman Hertzberger continues his presentation of his Utrecht Concert Hall project focusing on the articulation of the columns. ...
Charles Jencks The Language Of Modern...
Charles Jencks talks about metaphors, semantics, and syntax while describing late modern and postmodern architecture. He presents...

Jeffrey Kipnis & Eric Owen Moss Look You Got It All Wrong 1-clip_9522

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Eric Owen Moss discusses in detail the Trivida office, and the Waffle building in terms of the relationship between design and realization. He alternately discusses his buildings in terms of analogies of architectural history, with Travida representing the medieval; Stealth, the renaissance; Waffle, the baroque; and Pterodactyl, the modern.


Christian De Portzamparc Part One-clip_6104

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Portzamparc describes a couple of concert halls he has designed. The Luxembourg Philharmonic is located beside a office tower in a relatively non-descript square. He designed a facade of columns, letting light into the building, but blocking views of the surrounding buildings to create an open interior space. The design of the main concert hall has an ambiguity of space, which Portzamparc feels is ideal for listening to music. He also designed a concert hall for Nara, Japan, where he shaped the concert hall like a M?bius strip, which works well acoustically.


Aldo Van Eyck-clip_3242

View the Full Video: Aldo Van Eyck
January 1, 1985 | Video Lecturer: ,

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Aldo van Eyck’s presentation is followed by a panel discussion with Christian Norberg-Schulz an an unidentified woman. Norberg-Schulz agrees with van Eyck’s premise that modernism was misunderstood, but proposes a phenomenological approach, such as described by Edmund Husserl, that goes beyond an analytic examination by treating objects as things. The unidentified panelist suggests that there’s a connection between van Eyck European Space Agency columns and those used by Robert Venturi. Van Eyck protests, claiming that his columns are the way they are so that people could touch their tops and comments thatVenturi’s suffer from “columnitis.”


Herman Hertzberger-clip_2649

View the Full Video: Herman Hertzberger Duplicate
November 14, 1983 | Video Lecturer:

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Hertzberger discusses the implementation of columns within his buildings. Typical of a free plan, he strives to design the columns in such a way to create more open spaces. He describes it in terms of structuralist theory: the columns represent competence and the situations in which they are deployed is the performance. The opposition of competence and performance equates to the relationship between structure and infill.


Herman Hertzberger-clip_546

View the Full Video: Herman Hertzberger
November 4, 1981 | Video Lecturer:

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Herman Hertzberger continues his presentation of his Utrecht Concert Hall project focusing on the articulation of the columns. Using round columns for the first time in a project, he considers them appropriate for large open spaces because they do not direct the movement of the users. Also aware of the need to develop a grammar for connecting the columns to walls and other elements, he is careful to leave as many of them as freestanding as possible. This strategy relates to Chomsky’s concept of structuralism where the columns represent ideal competence and the situations represent practical performances. Developed through iterative sketches, the architect has to determine the infill in this type of building where the users constantly change.


Charles Jencks The Language Of Modern Architecture-clip_1398

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Charles Jencks talks about metaphors, semantics, and syntax while describing late modern and postmodern architecture. He presents examples of early eclecticism. He describes the linguistic basis of the development of modern architecture through Walter Gropius, Le Corbusier, and Ludwig Mies van der Rohe. Jencks describes how symbolism and semantics, purged during the era of high modernism, revived during the late 1960s and early 1970s.