Video Archive | Cornell University (4)

Steven Holl Compression-clip_3022
Steven Holl presents a series of works which dealt with Manhattan, including his World Trade Center Competition entry with...
Kevin Rhowbotham Deterritorializations-clip_3942
Michael Rotondi introduces Kevin Rhowbotham, an architect practicing with the collaborative Fashion Architecture and Taste (FAT),...
Kevin Rhowbotham Deterritorializations-clip_3943
Kevin Rhowbotham discusses the Bartlett School. One of the problems in London in the 1980s was that contemporary architecture did...
Gisue Hariri and Diana Agrest-clip_5628
Michael Rotondi introduces Pilar Viladas, who, in turn, introduces Gisue Hariri, noting that Hariri was born in Iran, studied at...

Steven Holl Compression-clip_3022

View the Full Video: Steven Holl Compression
September 11, 2003 | Video Lecturer:

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Steven Holl presents a series of works which dealt with Manhattan, including his World Trade Center Competition entry with Richard Meier, Peter Eisenman, and Charles Gwathmey. He discusses projects that attempt to incorporate elements of structure, form, skin, transparency, and the void, specifically the Cornell School of Architecture building.


Kevin Rhowbotham Deterritorializations-clip_3942

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Michael Rotondi introduces Kevin Rhowbotham, an architect practicing with the collaborative Fashion Architecture and Taste (FAT), and teacher at the Bartlett School. Rhowbotham earned a masters from Cornell under Colin Rowe, and completed his doctorate at Cambridge. He has just published the book Form To Programme.


Kevin Rhowbotham Deterritorializations-clip_3943

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Kevin Rhowbotham discusses the Bartlett School. One of the problems in London in the 1980s was that contemporary architecture did not have a face. He started teaching his students to generate an abstract form as the point of departure of the projects, as opposed to a blank piece of paper. Since program was introduced at a later stage, Rhowbotham called this “Form to Program,” and it enabled his students to produce projects that were outside the formal norms.


Gisue Hariri and Diana Agrest-clip_5628

View the Full Video: Gisue Hariri and Diana Agrest
March 27, 1991 | Video Lecturer: ,

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Michael Rotondi introduces Pilar Viladas, who, in turn, introduces Gisue Hariri, noting that Hariri was born in Iran, studied at Cornell University, and taught at Columbia University. The scope of her work is also documented, with pursuits involving architecture, furniture and lighting design.