Video Archive | Corner problem (6)

Jeffrey Kipnis Thesis Prep Talk Part One-clip_3634
Jeffrey Kipnis describes the flaws evident in the idea that one topic is solely involved in one discipline. He also discusses...
Jeffrey Kipnis-clip_1858
Jeffrey Kipnis discusses current takes on part-to-whole relationships in the work of Rem Koolhaas, John Hejduk, and Mies van der...
Wolf Prix Exile On Main Street-clip_1505
Wolf Prix uses sketches, models, and photographs to illustrate how his office is able to move from sketch to building. They try...
Kurt Forster-clip_3804
Kurt Forster examines several of Gehry's early houses, especially the Indiana Avenue Homes in Venice, California. Forster...
Mario Campi-clip_3504
Campi describes some of his public work, including schools and museums, as illustrations of his design methods. He uses site...
Charles Jencks New Japanese Architecture-clip_2199
Charles Jencks discusses univalent elements and multivalent elements in design, a key issue with postmodernism. Using the Chicago...

Jeffrey Kipnis Thesis Prep Talk Part One-clip_3634

Subclip

Jeffrey Kipnis describes the flaws evident in the idea that one topic is solely involved in one discipline. He also discusses the relevance of the corner problem and the problem of the cube. Lastly, he describes the mobius strip and how different ideas of architecture can relate to its single surface suggestion.


Mario Campi-clip_3504

View the Full Video: Mario Campi
October 3, 1984 | Video Lecturer:

Subclip

Campi describes some of his public work, including schools and museums, as illustrations of his design methods. He uses site conditions to inform design and orientation, creating a dialectic between past and present conditions. Campi discusses in depth a visitor center and museum he devised for an ancient castle, pointing out specific moments of interaction between history and the present.


Charles Jencks New Japanese Architecture-clip_2199

Subclip

Charles Jencks discusses univalent elements and multivalent elements in design, a key issue with postmodernism. Using the Chicago Civic Center and Mies’s IIT campus, Jencks compares and contrasts modernism with the emerging architecture of designers like Michael Graves and Ricardo Bofill, employing multifunctional elements and signifiers. He also goes in depth about IIT’s corner design and what it means to design an open or closed corner.