Video Archive | Deconstructivism (21)

Barbara Bestor Silent Disco
Hernan Diaz Alonso talks with Barbara Bestor about her "Silent Disco" installation at the SCI-Arc gallery. He begins by asking...
Barbara Bestor Silent Disco-clip_3740
Hernan Diaz Alonso talks with Barbara Bestor about her "Silent Disco" installation at the SCI-Arc gallery. He begins by asking...
George Yu-clip_2721
Eric Owen Moss introduces George Yu's work in terms of durability and fragility. He references constructivism, i.e. the Shukhov...
Gunther Domenig Structures That Fit My Nature-clip_3347
Eric Owen Moss and Peter Noever introduce Gunther Domenig. Noever argues that Domenig has made significant contributions to...
Gunther Domenig Structures That Fit My Nature-clip_3348
Domenig gives a detailed description of his documentation center in the Nazi Congress Hall in Nuremberg. While leaving most of...
Gunther Domenig Structures That Fit My Nature-clip_3350
Domenig desribes his house, Steinhaus, in Steindorf, Austria. Inspired by the mountains and stones in the region,...
Gunther Domenig Structures That Fit My Nature
Gunther Domenig talks about two projects he has worked on: repurposing the Nazi Congress Hall in Nuremberg into a documentation...
Lebbeus Woods
Woods presents two projects that challenge preconceived notions of what architecture should look like, what it should do, and how...

Barbara Bestor Silent Disco

April 8, 2011 | Video Lecturer:

Hernan Diaz Alonso talks with Barbara Bestor about her “Silent Disco” installation at the SCI-Arc gallery. He begins by asking Bestor about the installation’s relationship to the work that produced by her office. Diaz Alonso asks about the relationship of “weak form,” to the installation, leading to a general discussion her interest in both style and academics. Bestor and Diaz Alonso discuss the fabrication process, and the signficance of the materials. Bestor fields questions from the audience. Asked about the graphic agenda of the installation, Bestor cites Bridget Riley. Finally, she addresses in more detail her interest in plywood and plexiglass.

Clips

Barbara Bestor Silent Disco-clip_3740
Barbara Bestor Silent Disco-clip_3740
Barbara Bestor Silent Disco-clip_3741
Barbara Bestor Silent Disco-clip_3741

Barbara Bestor Silent Disco-clip_3740

View the Full Video: Barbara Bestor Silent Disco
April 8, 2011 | Video Lecturer:

Subclip

Hernan Diaz Alonso talks with Barbara Bestor about her “Silent Disco” installation at the SCI-Arc gallery. He begins by asking Bestor about the installation’s relationship to the work that produced by her office. Diaz Alonso asks about the relationship of “weak form,” to the installation, leading to a general discussion her interest in both style and academics. Bestor and Diaz Alonso discuss the fabrication process, and the signficance of the materials. They also explore the topic of disco and its aesthetic politics.


Gunther Domenig Structures That Fit My Nature-clip_3347

Subclip

Eric Owen Moss and Peter Noever introduce Gunther Domenig. Noever argues that Domenig has made significant contributions to architecture, including one of the most significant late 20th century buildings in Vienna, the Zentralsparkasse bank. He also refers to the Steinhaus, which has been Domenig’s life work and has established his formal language. Domenig is very hostile to tradition, which is a rare trait in Austria.


Gunther Domenig Structures That Fit My Nature-clip_3348

Subclip

Domenig gives a detailed description of his documentation center in the Nazi Congress Hall in Nuremberg. While leaving most of the structure of the building untouched, Domenig altered the circulation dramatically by inserting a spear through the building. He also added a gallery on the roof, which gives visitors a perspective on the building different from what was intended by the Nazis.


Gunther Domenig Structures That Fit My Nature-clip_3350

Subclip

Domenig desribes his house, Steinhaus, in Steindorf, Austria. Inspired by the mountains and stones in the region, Domenig maintains that the house is the truest expression of his personal style. While the use of concrete and steel usually imply a very grounded structure, Domenig makes shapes seem to float and appear weightless. While he claims it is inspired by vernacular architecture, he admits it is unlike a typical Austrian house.


Gunther Domenig Structures That Fit My Nature

March 31, 2005 | Video Lecturer:
Introduction by: ,

Gunther Domenig talks about two projects he has worked on: repurposing the Nazi Congress Hall in Nuremberg into a documentation center, and the ongoing design of his house in Steindorf Austria. In the documentation center in Nuremberg, Domenig penetrated the fragmented existing structure with a spear that serves as a main circulation shaft. Domenig’s “Steinhaus” is a house that emulates the mountains and stone of its landscape. He considers the house his life’s work and uses concrete, steel and glass to produce an explosion of shapes and spaces.

Clips

Gunther Domenig Structures That Fit My Nature-clip_3347
Gunther Domenig Structures That Fit My Nature-clip_3347
Eric Owen Moss and Peter Noever introduce Gunther Domenig. Noever argues that Domenig has made significant contributions to...
Gunther Domenig Structures That Fit My Nature-clip_3348
Gunther Domenig Structures That Fit My Nature-clip_3348
Domenig gives a detailed description of his documentation center in the Nazi Congress Hall in Nuremberg. While leaving most of...
Gunther Domenig Structures That Fit My Nature-clip_3350
Gunther Domenig Structures That Fit My Nature-clip_3350
Domenig desribes his house, Steinhaus, in Steindorf, Austria. Inspired by the mountains and stones in the region,...

Lebbeus Woods

October 20, 2003 | Video Lecturer:
Introduction by:

Woods presents two projects that challenge preconceived notions of what architecture should look like, what it should do, and how it interacts with other architecture. The first project deals with the concept of civilization and the role architecture plays in supporting or defining the existence and progress of man. This idea is manifested through a display for a museum exhibit in Berlin in 1999. The second project looks at the circus and other areas where extreme performance is on display. Woods presents a speculative project for Vienna that tests the limits of what is structurally possible.

Clips

Lebbeus Woods-clip_557
Lebbeus Woods-clip_557
Lebbeus Woods-clip_575
Lebbeus Woods-clip_575
Woods begins with a look at John Martin's depiction of the Tower of Babel to argue that civilization is inherently excessive,...
Lebbeus Woods-clip_576
Lebbeus Woods-clip_576