Video Archive | Design vocabulary (8)

Thom Mayne-clip_983
Mayne goes on to discuss the movement of his work toward a grounding in the relationship between platonic solid and the diversity...
Peter Cook
Sir Peter Cook discusses his work, invoking softies and wobblies and other vocabularies of form. Cook compares work by architects...
Peter Cook-clip_3396
Michael Rotondi introduces Peter Cook. Cook thanks Rotondi for the introduction.
Peter Cook-clip_3404
Peter Cook compares the work of Iakov Chernikhov, Neil Denari, and Clorindo Testa. Cook discusses the importance of rivalry and...
Frank O Gehry Part One-clip_1338
Gehry outlines his search for a personal language, and for his personal version of beauty. He quickly reviews various projects,...
Charles Jencks New Japanese Architecture-clip_2199
Charles Jencks discusses univalent elements and multivalent elements in design, a key issue with postmodernism. Using the Chicago...
James Stirling
Shelly Kappe introduces part one of this lecture by James Stirling. Stirling characterizes his work as "a set of archeological...
James Stirling-clip_3227
Stirling starts by listing the five building types he uses to characterize his work: (1) a composition of building masses...

Thom Mayne-clip_983

View the Full Video: Thom Mayne
March 19, 1997 |

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Mayne goes on to discuss the movement of his work toward a grounding in the relationship between platonic solid and the diversity and complexity of the world and site. He goes on to point out his deliberate re-ordering of the roles of architectural elements and the blurring between light, wall, space, etc. to develop a multivalent vocabulary. These results are in direct relation to a radical swing between a strict adherence to rule sets and extreme hands-on intervention.


Peter Cook

March 24, 1989 | Video Lecturer:

Sir Peter Cook discusses his work, invoking softies and wobblies and other vocabularies of form. Cook compares work by architects including that of Yakov Chernikhov, Neil Denari, and Clorindo Testa. He discusses the importance of rivalry and love among friends. He compares it to the act of teaching architecture. He also discusses bullshit, which encompasses everything.

Clips

Peter Cook-clip_3396
Peter Cook-clip_3396
Peter Cook-clip_3404
Peter Cook-clip_3404
Peter Cook-clip_3407
Peter Cook-clip_3407
Peter Cook-clip_3412
Peter Cook-clip_3412
Peter Cook discusses the formal vocabulary of his "high vegetational period." Cook comments on his methodology of scrambled egg...
Peter Cook-clip_3414
Peter Cook-clip_3414

Charles Jencks New Japanese Architecture-clip_2199

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Charles Jencks discusses univalent elements and multivalent elements in design, a key issue with postmodernism. Using the Chicago Civic Center and Mies’s IIT campus, Jencks compares and contrasts modernism with the emerging architecture of designers like Michael Graves and Ricardo Bofill, employing multifunctional elements and signifiers. He also goes in depth about IIT’s corner design and what it means to design an open or closed corner.


James Stirling

April 20, 1976 | Video Lecturer:
Introduction by:

Shelly Kappe introduces part one of this lecture by James Stirling. Stirling characterizes his work as “a set of archeological pieces.” He reviews a list of building types that he defines with images of his work, and continues with a long list of building characteristics that he links with multiple projects. For Stirling, the elements of built language are often recycled, but in completely different arrangements, meanings and results. He then proceeds with a presentation of his proposal for a modern art museum in Dusseldorf, Germany. The video ends abruptly before the end of Stirling’s talk.

Clips

James Stirling-clip_3224
James Stirling-clip_3224
Shelly Kappe introduces James Stirling by listing some of his awards and exhibitions of work. She goes on to relate her delight...
James Stirling-clip_3227
James Stirling-clip_3227
James Stirling-clip_3229
James Stirling-clip_3229

James Stirling-clip_3227

View the Full Video: James Stirling
April 20, 1976 | Video Lecturer:

Subclip

Stirling starts by listing the five building types he uses to characterize his work: (1) a composition of building masses emphasizing stability, (2) a wall building in which the conditions and treatment differ from one side to the other, (3) an L-shaped parti with linear wings, (4) a wrap-around plan which orients itself around internal courtyards, (5) a system of building that turns around and in on itself. He goes on to list and explain the twenty-two characteristics that have appeared in his work which, when paired with their accompanying slides, explain Stirling’s architectural intentions in regards to circulation, structure, materiality and the role of service elements.