Video Archive | Development (8)

Michael Sorkin-clip_5229
Sorkin lays out several proposals for the World Trade Center Site. His first proposals consist of converting the entire site into...
Ted Smith
Ted Smith argues that most of what ends up being built in San Diego is suburban sprawl, indistinguishable from sprawl in other...
Ted Smith-clip_5164
Linda Hart introduces Ted Smith of Smith and Others, characterizing his work as challenging traditional notions of rental...
Ted Smith-clip_5167
Ted Smith presents a proposal for housing in San Diego which aligned several housing prototypes in a perimeter block...
Ted Smith-clip_5168
Ted Smith discusses his Merrimac Building project in detail, describing a 300 square foot apartment unit with a giant fireplace...
Ted Smith-clip_5169
Ted Smith presents an ongoing residential project that turns what would otherwise be the parking structure into loft units and...
Elizabeth Plater-Zyberk-clip_4727
Plater-Zyberk answers questions from the audience. Even though Seaside is not a year round community, it demonstrates that better...
Sam Hall Kaplan Design Critique-clip_2241
Kaplan discusses urban public spaces as they relate to development, zoning and public utilization. He discusses missed...

Michael Sorkin-clip_5229

View the Full Video: Michael Sorkin
November 6, 2002 | Video Lecturer:

Subclip

Sorkin lays out several proposals for the World Trade Center Site. His first proposals consist of converting the entire site into parkland, or other methods of addressing the entire site with one building. Once it became clear that the building footprints had become sacred, he proposed towers that deviate from typical office tower typology.


Ted Smith

March 21, 2001 | Video Lecturer:
Introduction by:

Ted Smith argues that most of what ends up being built in San Diego is suburban sprawl, indistinguishable from sprawl in other parts of the country. He presents a proposal for housing in San Diego which aligned several housing prototypes in a perimeter block configuration. Smith had decided that the most common apartment building type in San Diego was anti-urban. He argued to developers that his lower density proposal for the Merrimac Building would be not only better urbanism, but more cost effective in the long term. He discusses his Merrimac Building project in detail, commenting that most of the space planning decisions were made in order to qualify for four unit financing. He argues that variety in urban development should be created through building separate small scale structures that are individually owned, rather than formally breaking up the facades of large buildings. He answers questions from the audience, describing the benefit of being the developer, architect, and contractor is the ability to finance projects with little or no money down. This process realizes slightly more profit, but, on the other hand, diminishes collaborative opportunities.

Clips

Ted Smith-clip_5164
Ted Smith-clip_5164
Ted Smith-clip_5165
Ted Smith-clip_5165
Ted Smith-clip_5166
Ted Smith-clip_5166
Ted Smith-clip_5167
Ted Smith-clip_5167
Ted Smith-clip_5168
Ted Smith-clip_5168

Ted Smith-clip_5164

View the Full Video: Ted Smith
March 21, 2001 | Video Lecturer:

Subclip

Linda Hart introduces Ted Smith of Smith and Others, characterizing his work as challenging traditional notions of rental housing. His interests stem from his observations of changing social structures, basic human needs, and the high cost of living in San Diego. He and his firm have received numerous awards for their work including for their Merrimac Building which was part of a successful downtown San Diego redevelopment project.


Ted Smith-clip_5167

View the Full Video: Ted Smith
March 21, 2001 | Video Lecturer:

Subclip

Ted Smith presents a proposal for housing in San Diego which aligned several housing prototypes in a perimeter block configuration. Smith had decided that the most common apartment building type in San Diego was anti-urban. He argued to developers that his lower density proposal for the Merrimac Building would be not only better urbanism, but more cost effective in the long term.


Ted Smith-clip_5168

View the Full Video: Ted Smith
March 21, 2001 | Video Lecturer:

Subclip

Ted Smith discusses his Merrimac Building project in detail, describing a 300 square foot apartment unit with a giant fireplace that occupied an entire wall. He also talks about the buildings adjacent to the project, including a 120 year old wood frame building and another which he called The Monitor. Reviewing the plans for the Merrimac, Smith comments that most of the space planning decisions were made in order to qualify for four unit financing. He argues that variety in urban development should be created through building separate small scale structures that are individually owned, rather than formally breaking up the facades of large buildings.


Ted Smith-clip_5169

View the Full Video: Ted Smith
March 21, 2001 | Video Lecturer:

Subclip

Ted Smith presents an ongoing residential project that turns what would otherwise be the parking structure into loft units and placing the parking on the roof. He answers questions from the audience, describing the benefit of being the developer, architect, and contractor is the ability to finance projects with little or no money down. This process realizes slightly more profit, but, on the other hand, diminishes collaborative opportunities.


Elizabeth Plater-Zyberk-clip_4727

View the Full Video: Elizabeth Plater-Zyberk
October 16, 1991 | Video Lecturer:

Subclip

Plater-Zyberk answers questions from the audience. Even though Seaside is not a year round community, it demonstrates that better design eventually leads to higher land values. Architects should be more involved with urban planning, and at least aware of good urban planning even if only designing a house.


Sam Hall Kaplan Design Critique-clip_2241

View the Full Video: Sam Hall Kaplan Design Critique
October 30, 1985 | Video Lecturer:

Subclip

Kaplan discusses urban public spaces as they relate to development, zoning and public utilization. He discusses missed opportunities, such as the lack of development along the Los Angeles River. He discusses projects which utilize low cost materials and the artist’s understanding of their material, material properties and material limitations. It is the architect’s obligation to fight the box, however ultimately they are obligated to ensure that it works. He states that landmarks provide a sense of history and place to their urban environments.