Video Archive | Dimensions (3)

Werner Oechslin-clip_5957
Werner Oechslin discusses the geometric construction of typography and its relationship to architecture. He stresses the...
Jorge Silvetti Architectural Space Let’s Call...
Analyzing the town of Leonforte, Silvetti found three distinct piazzas. He discusses the building typologies and the original...
Raphael Soriano Part One-clip_5085
Soriano shows slides, discussing Le Corbusier, proportionality and scale. He suggests that strict dimensionality is short-sighted...

Werner Oechslin-clip_5957

View the Full Video: Werner Oechslin
April 15, 1987 | Video Lecturer:

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Werner Oechslin discusses the geometric construction of typography and its relationship to architecture. He stresses the importance of tools and the impact of increasingly sophisticated tools on architecture. Oechslin
discusses architectural drawing, focusing on Vitruvius and Palladio. He distinguishes artistic from architectural drawings, and argues that Vitruvius equated “design” with “idea.”


Jorge Silvetti Architectural Space Let’s Call Things By Their Rightful Name-clip_4150

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Analyzing the town of Leonforte, Silvetti found three distinct piazzas. He discusses the building typologies and the original Baroque plan of the town. He found the strong correlation with the surrounding landscape, and determined the main road through the city was misplaced. The scale and proportions of Leonforte informed the design, which used the piazzas as connectors throughout the city. The new forms of the design coincide iconographically with the existing town and especially with the monumental fountain found at the old entrance to the town.


Raphael Soriano Part One-clip_5085

View the Full Video: Raphael Soriano Part One
January 1, 1977 | Video Lecturer:

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Soriano shows slides, discussing Le Corbusier, proportionality and scale. He suggests that strict dimensionality is short-sighted and does not deal with alternatives in configuration. Soriano discusses social change, dismissing “movements” as nonsense, emphasizing the need to focus on science. He suggests that public art is often only there to hide the fact that the architecture has failed to do the job. Soriano states the problem with simplicity is that even though he hates it, it’s the only natural thing in life.