Video Archive | Discourse (3)

Jean-Marc Ibos, Myrto Vitart and Dominique Lyon-clip_5562
Dominique Lyon presents a competition entry for the French Pavillion for Expo 1992 in Seville, stressing the importance of human...
Wolf Prix Discussion-clip_6111
Wolf Prix discusses how he might apply his ideas to buildings at larger scales in the future. Students ask Prix about the place...
Jorge Silvetti Architectural Space Let’s Call...
Silvetti affirms that architecture happens to things external to the mind, to things called buildings, that result from the...

Jean-Marc Ibos, Myrto Vitart and Dominique Lyon-clip_5562

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Dominique Lyon presents a competition entry for the French Pavillion for Expo 1992 in Seville, stressing the importance of human scale and his interest in expressing the “body condition.” Lyon reflects on the topic of modernity and the creation of a “great void” in the world of architecture, and the need to fill this void with discourse and inquiry.


Wolf Prix Discussion-clip_6111

View the Full Video: Wolf Prix Discussion
March 20, 1997 |

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Wolf Prix discusses how he might apply his ideas to buildings at larger scales in the future. Students ask Prix about the place of his architecture in architectural discourse and architectural history. Prix responds with an explanation of his lack of interest in both autonomy and in using an existing style. He stresses the importance of doing the “wrong thing” intentionally.


Jorge Silvetti Architectural Space Let’s Call Things By Their Rightful Name-clip_4148

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Silvetti affirms that architecture happens to things external to the mind, to things called buildings, that result
from the decision to make them do something. The performative quality of architecture can be involved in social discourses, which provide two conditions that generate different types of space. He questions whether Le Corbusier’s free plan was actually free, or just a metaphor for freedom. He argues it is a trait of modernism to represent a particular vision of society through metaphor. Anyone working with three dimensional forms necessarily deals with perspective.