Video Archive | Duration (7)

Michael Bell Spatial Infrastructure
Michael Bell describes his work as developing out of a struggle against the constraints of linear time and our place within it....
Michael Bell Spatial Infrastructure-clip_5005
Aaron Betsky introduces Michael Bell, characterizing his work as a simultaneous vertical dislocation and a horizontal extension,...
Michael Bell Spatial Infrastructure-clip_5006
Michael Bell describes his work as developing out of a struggle against the constraints of linear time and our place within it....
Michael Bell Spatial Infrastructure-clip_5007
Michael Bell discusses a project from 1989 that proposed a Topological Stoa" between East and West Berlin. He treated the void...
Michael Bell Spatial Infrastructure-clip_5008
Michael Bell talks about the city of Houston. The center is relatively small and chaotic during the day and almost completely...
Michael Bell Spatial Infrastructure-clip_5009
Michael Bell describes how a period of investigating how things work instead of how they look led to a series of collages that...
Bella Lewitzky Dance A Motion Space Time Art...
As Bella Lewitzky talks about the topic of time, dancers from her company improvise demonstrations. The demonstrate duration,...

Michael Bell Spatial Infrastructure

November 16, 1994 | Video Lecturer:
Introduction by:

Michael Bell describes his work as developing out of a struggle against the constraints of linear time and our place within it. His work is about architecture’s ability to cohere and overcome linear readings of time. He discusses a project from 1989 that proposed a Topological Stoa” between East and West Berlin. He talks about the city of Houston. The center is relatively small and chaotic during the day and almost completely vacated at night. The downtown never quite grew to its potential, being belted in by the mid-city region, and paralyzed after the oil industry collapse in the 1980s. Bell describes how a period of investigating how things work instead of how they look led to a series of collages that are about duration. He talks about an upcoming exhibit at UC Berkeley where he plans to juxtapose his own work with paintings by Hans Hoffman. He hopes for a transformed visuality that would unify time and place in the contemporary city. He concludes by discussing a project for a 1992 Japan Architect competition, for which Rem Koolhaas wrote the brief asking for “a house with no style.”

Clips

Michael Bell Spatial Infrastructure-clip_5005
Michael Bell Spatial Infrastructure-clip_5005
Aaron Betsky introduces Michael Bell, characterizing his work as a simultaneous vertical dislocation and a horizontal extension,...
Michael Bell Spatial Infrastructure-clip_5006
Michael Bell Spatial Infrastructure-clip_5006
Michael Bell Spatial Infrastructure-clip_5007
Michael Bell Spatial Infrastructure-clip_5007
Michael Bell Spatial Infrastructure-clip_5008
Michael Bell Spatial Infrastructure-clip_5008
Michael Bell Spatial Infrastructure-clip_5009
Michael Bell Spatial Infrastructure-clip_5009

Michael Bell Spatial Infrastructure-clip_5005

View the Full Video: Michael Bell Spatial Infrastructure
November 16, 1994 | Video Lecturer:

Subclip

Aaron Betsky introduces Michael Bell, characterizing his work as a simultaneous vertical dislocation and a horizontal extension, framing modernism in all of its centripetal and centrifugal movement. Having grown up in suburban Washington, D.C. he did his undergraduate work at Catholic University and completed a masters degree at UC Berkeley. According to Betsky, Bell creates a unstable context that crystallizes the dislocation between sensory reality and rational systems of coherence.


Michael Bell Spatial Infrastructure-clip_5006

View the Full Video: Michael Bell Spatial Infrastructure
November 16, 1994 | Video Lecturer:

Subclip

Michael Bell describes his work as developing out of a struggle against the constraints of linear time and our place within it. His work is about architecture’s ability to cohere and overcome linear readings of time. He uses the term “duration” as used by George Kubler in The Shape of Time, with the sense that inert physical objects occupy time differently than living things. The projects Bell discusses seek to incorporate types of transformations that allow access to physical time including visuality and an effort to transform the vectoral quality of perspective.


Michael Bell Spatial Infrastructure-clip_5007

View the Full Video: Michael Bell Spatial Infrastructure
November 16, 1994 | Video Lecturer:

Subclip

Michael Bell discusses a project from 1989 that proposed a
Topological Stoa” between East and West Berlin. He treated the void space as a courtyard that had been topologically inverted. In section the building is open vertically, except for the density of its walls.


Michael Bell Spatial Infrastructure-clip_5008

View the Full Video: Michael Bell Spatial Infrastructure
November 16, 1994 | Video Lecturer:

Subclip

Michael Bell talks about the city of Houston. The center is relatively small and chaotic during the day and almost completely vacated at night. The downtown never quite grew to its potential, being belted in by the mid-city region, and paralyzed after the oil industry collapse in the 1980s. It is surrounded by freeways. It is basically an oil company office park. There was a small resurgence of development in the late 1980s in an area outside of downtown called the Galleria.


Michael Bell Spatial Infrastructure-clip_5009

View the Full Video: Michael Bell Spatial Infrastructure
November 16, 1994 | Video Lecturer:

Subclip

Michael Bell describes how a period of investigating how things work instead of how they look led to a series of collages that are about duration. He talks about an upcoming exhibit at UC Berkeley where he plans to juxtapose his own work with paintings by Hans Hoffman. He hopes for a transformed visuality that would unify time and place in the contemporary city. He concludes by discussing a project for a 1992 Japan Architect competition, for which Rem Koolhaas wrote the brief asking for “a house with no style.”


Bella Lewitzky Dance A Motion Space Time Art Form-clip_2354

Subclip

As Bella Lewitzky talks about the topic of time, dancers from her company improvise demonstrations. The demonstrate duration, pulse, tempo and rhythm. To conclude the topic of time the dancers perform Lewitzky’s newest dance, “Impressions No. 2 (Vincent van Gogh)”.