Video Archive | Dwelling in outer space (10)

Constance Adams
Constance Adams describes her role as architect/generalist among technological specialists, engaged in optimizing the...
Space Station Habitation Module
David Nixon and SCI-Arc students discuss their a proposal for long-term living quarters on a spacecraft with representatives from...
Space Station Habitation Module-clip_5197
David Nixon and students discuss their a proposal for long-term living quarters on a spacecraft with representatives from NASA....
Space Station Habitation Module-clip_5198
Presentation participants enter a full-scale mockup habitation unit and discuss its functionality as a kitchen including the...
Marc Cohen Space Station Design
Marc Cohan provides an overview of human factors in space station architecture, and NASA's approach to these issues. First he...
Marc Cohen Space Station Design-clip_4153
David Nixon introduces Marc Cohen, an architect working at NASA Ames Research Center, where he is a part of the Space Human...
Marc Cohen Space Station Design-clip_4156
Cohen identifies the space shuttle cargo bay as the major design constraint. He reviews studies of various configurations,...
Marc Cohen Space Station Design-clip_4158
Cohen discusses the importance of the structures and the structural shells. He reviews various studies and configurations of...

Constance Adams

November 18, 2002 |
Introduction by:

Constance Adams describes her role as architect/generalist among technological specialists, engaged in optimizing the human/machine interface. She outlines the lessons of earlier space stations in terms of the physical and social environment, plus the complexities of construction in outer space. She describes a prototype habitation for Mars, and TransHab, developed as a expandable vehicle for space travel.

 

 

 

 


Space Station Habitation Module

David Nixon and SCI-Arc students discuss their a proposal for long-term living quarters on a spacecraft with representatives from NASA. Topics include the psychological need for tactile variety in environments, the problem of trash on a long space journey, and the difficulty of anticipating advances in technology and materials. They propose that older units would be repurposed as storage as new units replace them as living quarters. Presentation participants enter a full-scale mockup habitation unit and discuss its functionality as a kitchen including the placement of work surfaces, appliances, and windows. Students who contributed to the project present their individual portions and explain the concepts behind them, including a curved light deflecting wall panel that opens to allow access to storage.

Clips

Space Station Habitation Module-clip_5197
Space Station Habitation Module-clip_5197
Space Station Habitation Module-clip_5198
Space Station Habitation Module-clip_5198

Space Station Habitation Module-clip_5197

Subclip

David Nixon and students discuss their a proposal for long-term living quarters on a spacecraft with representatives from NASA. Topics include the psychological need for tactile variety in environments, the problem of trash on a long space journey, and the difficulty of anticipating advances in technology and materials. They propose that older units would be repurposed as storage as new units replace them as living quarters.


Space Station Habitation Module-clip_5198

Subclip

Presentation participants enter a full-scale mockup habitation unit and discuss its functionality as a kitchen including the placement of work surfaces, appliances, and windows. Students who contributed to the project present their individual portions and explain the concepts behind them, including a curved light deflecting wall panel that opens to allow access to storage.


Marc Cohen Space Station Design

May 28, 1985 | Video Lecturer:
Introduction by:

Marc Cohan provides an overview of human factors in space station architecture, and NASA’s approach to these issues. First he describes the space station program up to the present, the beginning of the definition study phase. Next he outlines the human factors as determined by the Space Human Factors Office. He concludes with a description of some of the work that has been completed so far.

Clips

Marc Cohen Space Station Design-clip_4154
Marc Cohen Space Station Design-clip_4154
Marc Cohen Space Station Design-clip_4156
Marc Cohen Space Station Design-clip_4156
Marc Cohen Space Station Design-clip_4157
Marc Cohen Space Station Design-clip_4157
Marc Cohen Space Station Design-clip_4158
Marc Cohen Space Station Design-clip_4158

Marc Cohen Space Station Design-clip_4153

View the Full Video: Marc Cohen Space Station Design
May 28, 1985 | Video Lecturer:

Subclip

David Nixon introduces Marc Cohen, an architect working at NASA Ames Research Center, where he is a part of the Space Human Factors Office and works on space station configurations. Cohen has provided SCI-Arc with a research grant for the Institute for Future Studies at SCI-Arc. This grant will allow students at SCI-Arc to investigate interior design aspects of the NASA space station habitability modules.


Marc Cohen Space Station Design-clip_4156

View the Full Video: Marc Cohen Space Station Design
May 28, 1985 | Video Lecturer:

Subclip

Cohen identifies the space shuttle cargo bay as the major design constraint. He reviews studies of various configurations, utilizing shell geometry and quick modeling techniques. He emphasizes the importance of developing definitions of human factors in order to maximize productivity and performance. He discusses new space mission characteristics, and concerns for safety and hygiene. The most critical human factor is that of volume. The severely constrained exterior limits of the station module has encouraged intensive volumetric studies.


Marc Cohen Space Station Design-clip_4158

View the Full Video: Marc Cohen Space Station Design
May 28, 1985 | Video Lecturer:

Subclip

Cohen discusses the importance of the structures and the structural shells. He reviews various studies and configurations of birthing modules and docking adapters. He discusses the connections between modules and the issue of remote versus manual connections. Cohen discusses wind tunnel tests, power distribution, and the display of adapters. He outlines the debate regarding the robotization of space stations.