Video Archive | Economics (37)

David Bergman Planning In Five Dimensions-clip_4960
David Bergman describes capital as the fifth dimension of urban development, and the force that creates cities and spurs economic...
David Bergman Planning In Five Dimensions
David Bergman proposes thinking about cities in terms of five parameters: the generic point, area "as signifier of culture,"...
Material Beyond Materials Panel 1 Integrating...
The panelists discuss performance criteria, the economics of using high-performance materials, and interdisciplinary...
Cleantech Corridor Competition Symposium-clip_3940
The jury discusses Los Angeles's infrastructure, the shifting political atmosphere and how public support is integral for...
Scifi Symposium A New Infrastructure Jury-clip_3494
Eric Owen Moss and Thom Mayne talk about the entries to A New Infrastructure, noting various innovations and...
Benjamin Bratton The Program Is Not On The Floor-clip_1479
Benjamin Bratton begins his lecture with a discussion of the programmatic potential of new forms, illustrated by the work of...
Stephanie Smith Lighten Up-clip_1492
Smith further addresses the connection between architecture and money that architects often neglect. She also expands upon her...
Stephanie Smith Lighten Up
Stephanie Smith presents a collection of her work from the last two years while focusing on the topics of resource sharing,...

David Bergman Planning In Five Dimensions-clip_4960

Subclip

David Bergman describes capital as the fifth dimension of urban development, and the force that creates cities and spurs economic growth. Bergman argues that all architectural proposals are economically evaluated accoding to four measures: net operating rate, capitalization rate, rate of return, and total rate of return.


David Bergman Planning In Five Dimensions

April 1, 2011 | Video Lecturer:
Introduction by:

David Bergman proposes thinking about cities in terms of five parameters: the generic point, area “as signifier of culture,” volume as “the power of the state exercised on a building,” time as “a pathway for development,” and capitalism as “a technology for development.” He discusses the contemporary city as a construction of economic policies and zoning regulations designed to increase capital investments. He discusses the urban mapping achieved by Nolli’s map of Rome. Bergman talks about the parameter of time as a pathway for urban development. When speaking about the parameter of volume, Bergman stresses how floor area ratios and zoning envelopes are manipulated by capital
and commerce. He contrasts urban growth over time in Los Angeles, Las Vegas, Butte, and Detroit. Bergman describes capital as the fifth dimension of urban development, and the force that creates cities and spurs economic growth. Bergman argues that all architectural proposals are economically evaluated accoding to four measures: net operating rate, capitalization rate, rate of return, and total rate of return.

Clips

David Bergman Planning In Five Dimensions-clip_4958
David Bergman Planning In Five Dimensions-clip_4958
David Bergman Planning In Five Dimensions-clip_4959
David Bergman Planning In Five Dimensions-clip_4959
David Bergman Planning In Five Dimensions-clip_4960
David Bergman Planning In Five Dimensions-clip_4960

Scifi Symposium A New Infrastructure Jury-clip_3494

Subclip

Eric Owen Moss and Thom Mayne talk about the entries to A New Infrastructure, noting various innovations and shortcomings. The discussion widens to include Los Angeles zoning, policy making, and economics.


Benjamin Bratton The Program Is Not On The Floor-clip_1479

Subclip

Benjamin Bratton begins his lecture with a discussion of the programmatic potential of new forms, illustrated by the work of Hernan Diaz Alonso. He comments on the speculative real estate bubble and the role that the blob or continuous surface has played in the generation of “architectural hood ornaments” but proposes that these projects are not relics of the past. He describes Diaz Alonso’s work as design for functions that don’t yet exist, incorporating the notion that program is an element of every surface of interaction. This is what makes Diaz Alonso’s work bio-political.


Stephanie Smith Lighten Up

Stephanie Smith presents a collection of her work from the last two years while focusing on the topics of resource sharing, communal living, and her inspiration from indigenous building practices. She documents two projects in detail. The first is the “Yurt,” a portable, bent wood framed dwelling structure constructed in the Philippines and later marketed to high-end hotels. The next project is the “Ecovillage,” in which Smith explores the relationship between architecture and money while developing a strategy for communal living in existing suburban structures.

Clips

Stephanie Smith Lighten Up-clip_1487
Stephanie Smith Lighten Up-clip_1487
Stephanie Smith Lighten Up-clip_1489
Stephanie Smith Lighten Up-clip_1489
Stephanie Smith Lighten Up-clip_1491
Stephanie Smith Lighten Up-clip_1491
Stephanie Smith Lighten Up-clip_1492
Stephanie Smith Lighten Up-clip_1492