Video Archive | Engineering (8)

Jeffrey Kipnis & Eric Owen Moss Look You Got It All...
Eric Owen Moss discusses in detail the Trivida office, and the Waffle building in terms of the relationship between design and...
Brendan MacFarlane-clip_3126
Brendan MacFarlane discusses "Le George," a rooftop restaurant for the Centre Pompidou, touching on the challenge of working...
Constance Adams
Constance Adams describes her role as architect/generalist among technological specialists, engaged in optimizing the...
Eleni Gigantes and Elia Zenghelis-clip_5671
Gigantes and Zenghelis present a selection of recent work from their office in Athens. They document a government sponsored...
Mark and Peter Anderson-clip_3967
Mark Anderson discusses the application of "Plumbing" to a broader architectural discourse. He describes the fabrication of a art...
Lebbeus Woods Vico Morcote Interview 1998
Lebbeus Woods describes his earliest influences, and reflects how, in retrospect, his nomadic childhood, engineering, and Heinz...
Peter Pearce
Peter Pearce argues that throughout history significant innovations in architectural design occurred due to structural...
Peter Pearce-clip_5521
Pearce believes engineers should be more hands-on, from their education to their professional role, and that they should have a...

Jeffrey Kipnis & Eric Owen Moss Look You Got It All Wrong 1-clip_9522

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Eric Owen Moss discusses in detail the Trivida office, and the Waffle building in terms of the relationship between design and realization. He alternately discusses his buildings in terms of analogies of architectural history, with Travida representing the medieval; Stealth, the renaissance; Waffle, the baroque; and Pterodactyl, the modern.


Constance Adams

November 18, 2002 |
Introduction by:

Constance Adams describes her role as architect/generalist among technological specialists, engaged in optimizing the human/machine interface. She outlines the lessons of earlier space stations in terms of the physical and social environment, plus the complexities of construction in outer space. She describes a prototype habitation for Mars, and TransHab, developed as a expandable vehicle for space travel.

 

 

 

 


Eleni Gigantes and Elia Zenghelis-clip_5671

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Gigantes and Zenghelis present a selection of recent work from their office in Athens. They document a government sponsored competition for a casino located on reclaimed land. They present another casino project, discussing the influence of Jon Jerde’s CityWalk. Gigantes and Zenghelis conclude with dormitories for a summer camp in Japan, designed with attention to the site and natural surroundings. They discuss their collaboration with engineers and builders.


Mark and Peter Anderson-clip_3967

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Mark Anderson discusses the application of “Plumbing” to a broader architectural discourse. He describes the fabrication of a art installation for the Alaska Design Forum that would convey essential physical data about Anchorage. He describes the challenges of working with engineers and plumbers in realizing an inflatable bladder system. He documents a competition entry for an extension of the Prado Museum done in collaboration with Andrew Zago.


Lebbeus Woods Vico Morcote Interview 1998

January 10, 1998 | Video Lecturer:

Lebbeus Woods describes his earliest influences, and reflects how, in retrospect, his nomadic childhood, engineering, and Heinz Von Foester are reflected in his work. He describes his astonishment at the first Archigram publications, noting that through Von Foester he had met Gordon Pask, who worked with Cedric Price. He characterizes his work as an exploration of ideas it is not possible to pursue in conventional practice, stressing architecture’s ethical dimension. Woods calls his drawings guides, presenting “What if …” scenarios, rather than plans to be executed, and–as in the Havana Project–exploring ways of building by accumulation of small gestures. The video was produced by Rob Gardner and Tony Hatto, with Charles Hellwig and Katsumi Moror, as part of a class taught by Luciano Riggolini. Dwayne Oyler provided the research which made this presentation possible.


Peter Pearce

September 13, 1996 | Video Lecturer:
Introduction by:

Peter Pearce argues that throughout history significant innovations in architectural design occurred due to structural innovations, while modern architecture seems more concerned with pure aesthetics rather than trying to accommodate structural innovation. He uses the saxophone as a familiar example of high-performance design. He discusses his own space frame structures, and his work on refining the connecting joint.

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Michael Dobry introduces Peter Pearce, noting that Pearce is an architect, engineer, and the author of Structure in Nature is...
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Peter Pearce-clip_5521
Pearce believes engineers should be more hands-on, from their education to their professional role, and that they should have a...
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View the Full Video: Peter Pearce
September 13, 1996 | Video Lecturer:

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Pearce believes engineers should be more hands-on, from their education to their professional role, and that they should have a more significant role in building design. Pearce advocates for high-performance design which optimizes the energy and materials used. This requires the engineers to reject or at least to question structural and architectural conventions.