Video Archive | Eric Owen Moss (6)

Jeffrey Kipnis Who Is Moss?
Jeffrey Kipnis begins his discussion of Eric Owen Moss's work by questioning the notion of the self, its history and our...
Peter Cook Part Two Procedures Or Some Favourite...
Peter Cook equates his inspirations to a child's favorite toys, stressing the need to have fun, remain curious, and strive to be...
Matthew Melnyk mySpace-clip_2813
Matthew Melnyk discusses the structural methodology and solutions for If Not Now, When? (2009) with Eric Owen Moss....
David Sarkissyan-clip_5680
Sarkissyan discusses a 2001 international architectural competition, Russia's first since the Soviet era, for a new Mariinsky...
Charles Jencks Recent Italian And Japanese...
Charles Jencks defends his views during a question and answer session. He responds to questions regarding meaning and signifiers,...
Charles Jencks The Language Of Modern...
Charles Jencks paries questions about modernism overshadowing the Art Nouveau movement, the death of Art Nouveau, as well as that...

Jeffrey Kipnis Who Is Moss?

Jeffrey Kipnis begins his discussion of Eric Owen Moss’s work by questioning the notion of the self, its history and our contemporary ideas of the self formed primarily during the nineteenth century. Kipnis compares the California School of architects and the East Coast’s New York Five in terms of rhetorical figures and part-to-whole relationships. He dismisses the idea of a pleasure in violence within Eric Owen Moss’ work, choosing to relate his work more to artist Bruce Nauman and the Greek concept of agon.


Peter Cook Part Two Procedures Or Some Favourite Things-clip_4817

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Peter Cook equates his inspirations to a child’s favorite toys, stressing the need to have fun, remain curious, and strive to be “usefully daft.” he compares musical notation to architectural drawing. He discusses Las Vegas as an adult playground. He characterizes Toyo Ito as another architect to continues to play with architecture.


Charles Jencks The Language Of Modern Architecture-clip_1400

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Charles Jencks paries questions about modernism overshadowing the Art Nouveau movement, the death of Art Nouveau, as well as that death of modernism. Jencks also fields questions that concern mass consumerism, kitsch, and meanings associated with the forms of modernism. In the end, Jencks makes assumptions and predictions about where architecture is headed, how it will get there, and what types of theoretical associations will be appropriate with future architectural movements.