Video Archive | Erich Mendelsohn (4)

Jeffrey Kipnis & Eric Owen Moss Look You Got It All...
Eric Owen Moss responds to the proposed topic by describing his Penelope theory of architecture, in which building and making are...
Claude Parent Part One-clip_3383
Claude Parent lectures in French, and an interpreter provides an English translation. Parent illustrates his ideas by drawing on...
Rosemarie Haag Bletter
Rosemarie Haag Bletter gives a lecture on the expressionist movement after World War I, focusing on Erich Mendelsohn and Bruno...
Reyner Banham The Fagus And Fiat Factories A European...
Banham continues his lecture with a discussion of the impact of photographic evidence of American industrial buildings on...

Jeffrey Kipnis & Eric Owen Moss Look You Got It All Wrong 1-clip_9521

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Eric Owen Moss responds to the proposed topic by describing his Penelope theory of architecture, in which building and making are necessarily accompanied by unmaking and doubt. He reviews important influences, including the radicalized environment of Berkeley in the 1960s, Corbusier’s proposed balance of Apollo and Dionysus, El Caracol in Chichen Itza, and Immanuel Velikovsky. He contrasts a sketch by Erich Mendelsohn with his later Einstein Tower, arguing that by failing to address
the implications of initial idea, Mendelsohn “built the outside of the sketch.”


Claude Parent Part One-clip_3383

View the Full Video: Claude Parent Part One
October 14, 1998 | Video Lecturer:

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Claude Parent lectures in French, and an interpreter provides an English translation. Parent illustrates his ideas by drawing on paper attached to the wall. Parent stresses the importance of movement in architecture, evoking the ocean and waves as a image of what he is interested in architecture. He calls himself a magician of architecture, and claims he designs illusions. Parent argues that Frank Lloyd Wright and Erich Mendelsohn were the first architects to incorporate the illusion of movement in
architecture.


Rosemarie Haag Bletter

Rosemarie Haag Bletter gives a lecture on the expressionist movement after World War I, focusing on Erich Mendelsohn and Bruno Taut. Haag Bletter emphasizes the continuity of expressionism lies not in stylistic formalism, but in the underlying concepts and social convictions of the period.

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Rosemarie Haag Bletter-clip_3678
Rosemarie Haag Bletter-clip_3678
Rosemarie Haag Bletter-clip_3680
Rosemarie Haag Bletter-clip_3680
Rosemarie Haag Bletter reviews the development of anti-urban attitudes post-World War I, which were affiliated with the rise of...
Rosemarie Haag Bletter-clip_3681
Rosemarie Haag Bletter-clip_3681

Reyner Banham The Fagus And Fiat Factories A European Response-clip_1241

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Banham continues his lecture with a discussion of the impact of photographic evidence of American industrial buildings on European modern architecture. He describes a time when European modernists saw American engineers as a sort of noble savage, attaining at once an abstract modern and an abstract ancient which escaped the conventions of architecture. Banham describes the mythic impact these photos had on architects who had never seen American industrial structures in person. He goes on to include examples of attempts by Erich Mendelsohn, Mario Chiattoni and Le Corbusier to adopt, publish and further romanticize these forms.